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  #31  
Old 11-29-2007, 09:05 AM
RR RR is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

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I grew up in Arkansas so it's hard for me to know how long this stuff has been going on in the rest of the country. We had snake handlers and tongue talkers around all the time.

When I went to the University of Arkansas in the early 80's, we used to get baked and go party at Sister Cindy's rallies on campus.

Has anyone else here ever seen this woman and/or her now-husband Svengali Brother Jed on their campus? I think they stick to mainly the Midwest and South. Funny stuff. I have fond memories of the good times we had hooting it up with Cindy ranting about 'whores' and 'whoremongers'.

This clip gives a bit of a taste, but you'd have to see Cindy live w/o hubby in tow to really appreciate what a hilarious whack job she is.

I don't suppose this furthers the discussion of the thread any but I had a good time reminiscing about the old days being told I was going to Hell for smoking dope and fornicating.

"Hey Cindy, can you point me to some of these whores? I haven't fornicated nearly as much as I'd like the past couple months."

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In the late 80s/early 90s we have brother Jed every spring at Ohio University. It has to be the same guy. It was pretty awesome (entertainment wise). He would stand on the street corner and preach and yell at women passing by about how they were dressed.
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  #32  
Old 11-29-2007, 09:17 AM
katyseagull katyseagull is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

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great post wookie. i didn't mean to suggest that fundamentalist christians operated in the spirit of christianity. i just think that if they were to draw the line in the sand, many christians who view themselves as socially moderate/liberal would fall in line-- referendums regarding gay marriage come to mind.

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I agree with you tarheel. People who do not classify themselves as fundamentalist at all but who call themselves Christian will very often get in line behind a cause. I think religious people in general fall in line, often without giving it much thought.
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  #33  
Old 11-29-2007, 09:44 AM
katyseagull katyseagull is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

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I loathe deliberate institutionalised ignorance like in those videos though. That's child neglect at best and abuse at worst, in my book.

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As for what I saw in the video I loathe this kind of thing too. Trust me DB I really don't think this is common in America, at least not like that video it is not. That's just nuttiness.

But in the past year I've been doing a lot of thinking about this issue of devout Christianity, mostly because I have a couple friends and family members who are born again Christians. They take their religion very seriously, studying the bible 2-3 times a week, praying often. They are viewed as nuts and extremists by most people I know. They are not respected. And yet when I talk to them I'm surprised by how kind and non-judgmental they are. They are very concerned with the direction the country is moving. They are trying to raise their children to be deeply religious while living in a secular world. It's a real challenge.

I have a sister who is an atheist and she thinks it's terrible for my other sister to raise her children to study the bible. She thinks it's a horrible thing to do. Now I doubt she would ever say such a thing to a devout Jew or Muslim or Buddhist but when it comes to Christianity she thinks it's indoctrination.
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  #34  
Old 11-29-2007, 10:29 AM
ChipWrecked ChipWrecked is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

These people are not hard-shell evangelists. In the hills, you ain't allowed to have musical instruments in church, 'cause God gave you a voice to praise Him with, and that's all you need.

[censored] heathen hypocrites. Cameras and amplifiers, bah!
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  #35  
Old 11-29-2007, 10:35 AM
ChipWrecked ChipWrecked is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

Please forgive my levity on this issue. I have the highest regard for anyone who walks the talk regarding religion.

We had a 'resort' when I was a kid with a back row of cabins not visible from the road, that were popular with folks enjoying afternoon delights with persons not their spouses. A number of these were some of the loudest Bible thumpers around. I developed a very low tolerance for hypocrisy.
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  #36  
Old 11-29-2007, 10:51 AM
4_2_it 4_2_it is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

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This strikes me as truly awful and artful reasoning devoid of human empathy. It must be nice not to be the outcast or care about those who might be shunned, even if children. I could never get my conscience in that place, and if there were a God, I would pray with all my might that I never would.

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So you can't refute my logic so you resort to the tried and true dabte tactic of attacking your opponent's character. Since I am apparently devoid of human emphany and lack your moral compass my statement has to horribly wrong? Sorry that my opinion doesn't count since it is at odds with yours. Wookie's religious views would tell him to turn the other cheek. My views tell me just to say good day sir.
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  #37  
Old 11-29-2007, 11:23 AM
KilgoreTrout KilgoreTrout is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

Grunching - I read the first dozen replies or so.

The similarities between the American Fundamentalist Right and fascism are obvious, both in principle and in deed. Over the past several months, there has been a concerted effort of the religious right to bombard media outlets with opinion pieces, commentaries, and letters to the editor painting religion (read: Christianity) as under siege.

They deride supporters of gay marriage as sodomites. They claim schools are marginalizing Christmas, restricting students' ability to pray or wear religious symbols on their persons. They paint the "liberal media" or "East-Coast Intellectuals" and the like as the great Satan. They try to force religion into public school curricula (see Dover, PA). They claim evolution is "just" a theory, despite the innumerable proofs it has sustained.

In short, the Fundamentalists are waging a battle for hearts and minds using classic fascist techniques. They claim the nation is in decline (liberal media, illegal immigrants, gun control, gay marriage, removal of the ten commandments from courthouses, etc.), and that they are victims (threats to "our way of life"). They use half-truths and outright propaganda to advance their agenda. They claim moral authority by virtue of dogma. They are threatened by reason. They make use of scapegoats (liberl media, atheists, gays, terrorists, Islamists, Zionists, whatever).

Where have we seen this before?

I'm not blessed with faith. I see religions as hegemonical systems promulgated by certain human beings to mollify others. Religion holds power over its adherents. Religious leaders likewise serve as lower-level hegemons. Though many, if not most religions foster charity, good will, and peaceful practices, there is always the other side of the coin - the threat of eternal punishment, of guilt, of sin.

Of course, I'm not differentiating between the political "Religious Right" and religious sects. The system of power and control used for political ends could very well be bastardizing real faith. Still, the movement does not seem to be on the decline, and its methods are frighteningly familiar.
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  #38  
Old 11-29-2007, 12:16 PM
Brad1970 Brad1970 is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

Mr. Wookie, great post. Couldn't agree more.

FWIW, the religious right/fundalmentalist/religious people nametags that alot of you are throwing around is misleading...especially to those not familiar with it. This group in the US are predominately Christians (some may not act like it though). These generalized 'religious' terms could include Muslims, Buddists, Jews, etc. as well depending on your point of view.
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  #39  
Old 11-29-2007, 12:32 PM
J.A.K. J.A.K. is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

I switched(by choice)from public school to a small Christian school my sophomore year in HS. This school/church would definitely be considered fundamental/"legalistic". Culottes below the knees for girls, navy knit slacks and tie (square sock-tie FTW!) for the boys. No shorts anytime. I played JV/Varsity basketball and we had to wear sweatpants while playing...LOL! Hair must be a certain length, cheerleaders could not do legkicks...you get the point. The teachers actually lived this type of life 24/7 and it was taught as "the" way according to scripture.

Looking back, I realize how miserable those people were trying to constantly adhere to those misguided principles, especially the females. As for me, I was distracted enough by sports/girlfriends/friends -basic HS stuff- to not be overwhelmed by the rules. I still managed to have a blast during HS. I had a good "balance"/freedom in my home life in that my family did not adhere to the strictures of the school. I simply accepted them as a student.

Fundamentalists seem to think there is some stasis of rigorous piety that can be reached and that it can only be reached in the narrow confines of painting the world demonic. I have yet to meet a truly happy fundy. I imagine they approach some perverse happiness while spewing invectives. But for ones claiming to have a stranglehold on truth and the path to peace, this is hardly rewarding.

I worry less about the kook fringe in the video by OP, than the zeitgeist that will relegate the truths of scripture into obscurity. My school eventually ended- cracking up from the top down. Fundies would never be able to hold a consortium very long because they would always devolve into chaos from a myopic hyper-defensiveness or a who can out-Nit who regarding interpretation of scripture/creed. Rather, I fear moral relativism, nihilism, and iconoclasm will serve to suppress an invaluable source of guidance (if only as an alternative) and "first principles" for life.

Good thread. [img]/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]
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  #40  
Old 11-29-2007, 01:21 PM
Blarg Blarg is offline
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Default Re: The rise of the fundamentalist right in America

[ QUOTE ]
great post wookie. i didn't mean to suggest that fundamentalist christians operated in the spirit of christianity. i just think that if they were to draw the line in the sand, many christians who view themselves as socially moderate/liberal would fall in line-- referendums regarding gay marriage come to mind.

[/ QUOTE ]

I think this is true to and seems to be largely proven out in our political system. Reaching out to christians and encouraging them to be one-issue voters is a vital part of the Republican strategy. "Family Matters Most," and other slogans that are absurdly out of place in politics, as no party has better control over who is cheating on their wife or kisses their babies more, and those things are completely outside the realm of politics anyway.
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