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  #61  
Old 11-08-2007, 04:53 PM
pineapple888 pineapple888 is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

[ QUOTE ]
Those production companies are not on the WGA because they are non-legit.

[/ QUOTE ]

[img]/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img] Some are perfectly legit. Some aren't.

No matter what, studios aren't going to listen to their pitches for quite a while yet (stockpiled scripts, no established writers available for rewrites), so the general consensus is that it's kinda pointless to be going out with a script for now.

But if the prodco is fully independent (it gets movies made outside the studio system), well, off you go.

The "blackballing" by the WGA is just about the most toothless thing imaginable for feature writers. You become "fi-core" which means you still have to pay dues, and you still get to work for WGA signatories, and you still get health and pension, but don't get to vote at meetings, or go see free movies at the guild. Big deal. Plus, as fi-core, you can still work for non-sigs if you want.
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  #62  
Old 11-08-2007, 05:16 PM
Tha Villain Tha Villain is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

So I guess the best thing for an aspiring writer to do would be stockpile their own scripts and wait for the strike to end (possibly months from now)? Then hope they get a break once all the established writers come back?

Sounds like I need to do find something else to try to do with my life lol.

Also, writer John August has some pretty good blog coverage from the front lines.
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  #63  
Old 11-08-2007, 05:26 PM
daveT daveT is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

Okay, you guys exposed my ignorance.

Dom. I was not saying that Kimmel was not a member of the WGA, I was saying that Ad Libbing would not be considered writing.

Interesting anecdote. A professional writer in her 40s gives this speech:

She shows a picture of herself when she was twelve: "I have a few scripts that I wrote at this time of my life that aren't sold yet." Some of the audience laughs, the other half cringes.

Just saying, no rush to get it all out their now. More production companies would mean more opportunities. I am also aware that the companies that you listed are all pretty much locked with their own scripting. Apatow writes all of his own stuff with a tight-knit team. Rodriquez teams up with Tarantino, and the Wayan's Brothers writes things like "White Girls." All of these production companies where created for the purpose of promoting their own non-Hollywood works.

That is a way to get your own work out there: Create your own independent production company and forget about shopping around.
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  #64  
Old 11-08-2007, 05:27 PM
KilgoreTrout KilgoreTrout is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

[ QUOTE ]
stockpile their own scripts

[/ QUOTE ]

If you're a WGA member, the union requires that you turn in all partials within 5 days of the start of the strike, regardless of who "owns" them. This is intended to assure members put in their 20 hours/week on the picket line and do not surreptitiously work on scripts. How it's enforceable is anyone's guess.

edit

it's part of the "Script Validation Program." Note that it covers spec work for existing struck shows as well as anything produced on spec within the past 6 months.
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  #65  
Old 11-08-2007, 05:42 PM
pineapple888 pineapple888 is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
stockpile their own scripts

[/ QUOTE ]

If you're a WGA member, the union requires that you turn in all partials within 5 days of the start of the strike, regardless of who "owns" them. This is intended to assure members put in their 20 hours/week on the picket line and do not surreptitiously work on scripts. How it's enforceable is anyone's guess.

edit

it's part of the "Script Validation Program." Note that it covers spec work for existing struck shows as well as anything produced on spec within the past 6 months.

[/ QUOTE ]

1.) This program only covers work already submitted as a spec to a "struck company". I've seen nothing that penalizes WGA members for continuing to work on specs that haven't gone out yet.

2.) Dozens of writing deals closed just before the strike. According to one quote from a rep, these writers will not actually be writing during the strike, but will simply be "thinking really, really hard". [img]/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]
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  #66  
Old 11-08-2007, 05:44 PM
Tha Villain Tha Villain is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
stockpile their own scripts

[/ QUOTE ]

If you're a WGA member, the union requires that you turn in all partials within 5 days of the start of the strike, regardless of who "owns" them. This is intended to assure members put in their 20 hours/week on the picket line and do not surreptitiously work on scripts. How it's enforceable is anyone's guess.

edit

it's part of the "Script Validation Program." Note that it covers spec work for existing struck shows as well as anything produced on spec within the past 6 months.

[/ QUOTE ]

Thing is, I'm not a WGA member, so "Pencils Down" doesn't apply to me. As I understand the rules, if a non-member does scab work or has contact with struck companies they could keep them from joining the guild.

My thought was that I could continue writing. I have 3 screenplays I beleive are ready to be submitted, and by the time the strike is over I could probably have 6 completed. All I'd be doing during that time is writing since I wouldn't be sending out the 3 I already have ready to go.

I like my chances sending out 6 screenplays rather than 3. The only thing is, I'd have to wait months until I could actually see any kind of appreciable result from any of my writing. I'm not friends with many people in the industry and no matter how many friends and family tell me they enjoyed what I wrote, it doesn't mean a thing.

Good thing I love writing. If I was doing it just for a paycheck I'd be in trouble right now lol.

However, I wasn't trying to hijack this thread, just looking for some insight. Thanks for those who had input.
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  #67  
Old 11-08-2007, 05:56 PM
pineapple888 pineapple888 is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
stockpile their own scripts

[/ QUOTE ]

If you're a WGA member, the union requires that you turn in all partials within 5 days of the start of the strike, regardless of who "owns" them. This is intended to assure members put in their 20 hours/week on the picket line and do not surreptitiously work on scripts. How it's enforceable is anyone's guess.

edit

it's part of the "Script Validation Program." Note that it covers spec work for existing struck shows as well as anything produced on spec within the past 6 months.

[/ QUOTE ]

Thing is, I'm not a WGA member, so "Pencils Down" doesn't apply to me. As I understand the rules, if a non-member does scab work or has contact with struck companies they could keep them from joining the guild.

My thought was that I could continue writing. I have 3 screenplays I beleive are ready to be submitted, and by the time the strike is over I could probably have 6 completed. All I'd be doing during that time is writing since I wouldn't be sending out the 3 I already have ready to go.

I like my chances sending out 6 screenplays rather than 3. The only thing is, I'd have to wait months until I could actually see any kind of appreciable result from any of my writing. I'm not friends with many people in the industry and no matter how many friends and family tell me they enjoyed what I wrote, it doesn't mean a thing.

Good thing I love writing. If I was doing it just for a paycheck I'd be in trouble right now lol.

However, I wasn't trying to hijack this thread, just looking for some insight. Thanks for those who had input.

[/ QUOTE ]

6>3 is a common misconception. Nobody ever says "send me your 6 scripts". They say "send me your best one", and if it's not outstanding, they never look at anything from you again.

What you need is 1. One amazing, flawless, pretty damn near perfect script. An "A" won't do it. You need to get an "A+". That's what it takes to break in. Then, ideally, you should have a second one ready as backup.

It's taken me over five years to get my two "A+" scripts ready. So thinking in terms of months is pretty short-sighted IMHO. Learn your craft. It's very, very, very hard.
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  #68  
Old 11-08-2007, 06:11 PM
CharlieDontSurf CharlieDontSurf is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
[ QUOTE ]
stockpile their own scripts

[/ QUOTE ]

If you're a WGA member, the union requires that you turn in all partials within 5 days of the start of the strike, regardless of who "owns" them. This is intended to assure members put in their 20 hours/week on the picket line and do not surreptitiously work on scripts. How it's enforceable is anyone's guess.

edit

it's part of the "Script Validation Program." Note that it covers spec work for existing struck shows as well as anything produced on spec within the past 6 months.

[/ QUOTE ]

Thing is, I'm not a WGA member, so "Pencils Down" doesn't apply to me. As I understand the rules, if a non-member does scab work or has contact with struck companies they could keep them from joining the guild.

My thought was that I could continue writing. I have 3 screenplays I beleive are ready to be submitted, and by the time the strike is over I could probably have 6 completed. All I'd be doing during that time is writing since I wouldn't be sending out the 3 I already have ready to go.

I like my chances sending out 6 screenplays rather than 3. The only thing is, I'd have to wait months until I could actually see any kind of appreciable result from any of my writing. I'm not friends with many people in the industry and no matter how many friends and family tell me they enjoyed what I wrote, it doesn't mean a thing.

Good thing I love writing. If I was doing it just for a paycheck I'd be in trouble right now lol.

However, I wasn't trying to hijack this thread, just looking for some insight. Thanks for those who had input.

[/ QUOTE ]

you won't be sending out any scripts...your agent or manager will. And its doubtful that any of your scripts are submission ready unless someone within the industry has raved about one of them.

If u sell a script or anything that is non reality/animation while the strike is on u can pretty much just write off getting into the WGA. So basically don't do it.

If the strike goes long and ends in say Feb/March/April etc u won't have a much of a chance to make a sale cuz you'll be going up against specs from all the top writers in hollywood. Happened in 88 too.
All writers will be writing specs during their downtime even if they say they're not going to.

not sure about entering contests while a strike is going on
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  #69  
Old 11-08-2007, 06:17 PM
daveT daveT is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

Charlie and Pineapple: I once volunteered at a pitch fest. Thoughts please?
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  #70  
Old 11-08-2007, 06:18 PM
jester710 jester710 is offline
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Default Re: Screen Writers Guild Strike?

For those who were curious about how this affects actors (which is pretty much all of you, because we all know actors are all that really matter anyway):

1. The unions have forbidden actors who write from writing during this time; however, they are free to act.

2. Actors are watching this strike with great interest because the SAG contract expires in June, and they want a piece of the new media pie too. This will affect the WGA strike, because the producers know whatever they give the writers will make the actors demand more.

3. Soon, instead of getting rejected at every audition, I simply won't be getting any more auditions. In other words, my rate of rejection is going to plummet. Hooray!
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