electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 01:40 AM
Ask a music scene micro celebrity

From this thread:

I have traveled in the music scene as a musician and recording engineer for better than 25 years. I have worked on a couple thousand records, some of them with famous rockstars, though most of them you're probably never heard of. I know a lot about making records, recording technology, touring, being in a rock band and the like. I own Electrical Audio, a 2-studio recording complex in Chicago, Illinois, where I make records every day.

I will answer any questions related to being in a touring/recording rock band, working in the studio with musicians both great and famous, making records, brushes with actual rock star celebrities, etc.

In NLHE, I am a prolific donator. I can hold my own in 7stud.

Any questions?


PattdownManiac
(contrary to popular belief, still emo.)
07/03/07 01:46 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

You are Steve Albini? That is awesome. Of all the people you've worked with what bands do you feel have the best musicianship.

whale_hunter
(member)
07/03/07 02:09 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do you honestly feel like Cobain was a genuis? Or just a hard worker guy who hit the lotto?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 02:13 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Pattdown, the Jesus Lizard was easily the best group of musicians I've ever worked with in terms of aggregate talent and ability, but I've worked with a bunch of incredible musicians on individual instruments. I have been most impressed by great drummers and great singers, because drumming and singing are the two most difficult things to do well.

Drummers:
Jim White (Dirty Three, Nina Nastasia)
Rey Washam (Scratch Acid, Big Boys, Rapeman, Ministry)
Britt Walford (Slint, Breeders)
Martin Atkins (Public Image Ltd, Ministry, Pigface)
Glenn Kotche (Wilco, Edith Frost)
Bun E. Carlos (Cheap Trick)
Dave Grohl (Nirvana)

Singers:
Nina Nastasia
Robin Zander (Cheap Trick)
Kim Deal (Pixies, Breeders)

Most recently, I had my mind blown by Joanna Newsom's playing on the harp. She is a wonder on that thing.


PattdownManiac
(contrary to popular belief, still emo.)
07/03/07 02:15 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Which album of her's did you record? She is so great!

Limesparks
(NOT A MOD)
07/03/07 02:32 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Micro? Albini? from Big Black? every indie rock band's dream producer?

Any other avid card players among your contemporaries? Regular card games in Frank Black's or PJ Harvey's basement or somesuch that I'm missing out on?

Also, thanks for the sheer awesomeness of:
Surfer Rosa
In Utero
Goat
Transaction de Novo
Arise Therefore
I'm sure there's like 50 more in my meager collection that I'm not thinking of.


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/03/07 02:35 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

My ladyfriend tells me that your original mix of In Utero was not green lighted by their label, and they went with a different mix/track list. She claims that your version is floating somewhere (she says a coworker has it on his iPod) and she's wondering how she could get a hold of it?

EDIT: She also would like to know the rate you charge to record at your studio? Whether you or someone else is the engineer.


thepizzlefosho
(old hand)
07/03/07 02:41 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

this thread is very close to delivering. please answer the others questions and continue providing additional intriguing information.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 02:41 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Genius is a weird and inappropriate word, and hard work is underrated, but Kurt Cobain had a distinct and personal take on the world, and generally, when someone strikes a chord with his audience, that's what people respond to.

There were a lot of bands the "sounded like Nirvana" at the time Nirvana made it big, but none of them have had the same long-lasting influence. I have to admit that I wasn't particularly a fan of Nirvana when I was asked to work on In Utero, but during the course of making the record I came to appreciate that they were genuine about their band and their music, that Kurt was capable of sophisticated thinking, and that they and their music were unique.

If you think of the other bajillion-sellers of the Nineties, not very many of them have survived as significant influences today. I think there's a reason beyond luck for that to be the case.


PattdownManiac
(contrary to popular belief, still emo.)
07/03/07 02:43 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Who were the worst musicians? Any guys that could barely play their instruments?

whale_hunter
(member)
07/03/07 02:48 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Genius is a weird and inappropriate word, and hard work is underrated, but Kurt Cobain had a distinct and personal take on the world, and generally, when someone strikes a chord with his audience, that's what people respond to.

There were a lot of bands the "sounded like Nirvana" at the time Nirvana made it big, but none of them have had the same long-lasting influence. I have to admit that I wasn't particularly a fan of Nirvana when I was asked to work on In Utero, but during the course of making the record I came to appreciate that they were genuine about their band and their music, that Kurt was capable of sophisticated thinking, and that they and their music were unique.

If you think of the other bajillion-sellers of the Nineties, not very many of them have survived as significant influences today. I think there's a reason beyond luck for that to be the case.




Thanks for the response. I hope it didn't come off like I was knocking him for "just being hard working". I have read a few Biography's on Nirvana (with you included) and I find him to be fascinating.
Just wondered what you thought having actually met the man.

Thanks again.


doubLe a tom
(failure (IM A PUNKROCKER YES I AM))
07/03/07 02:53 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

in utero, one of my favorite albums, and there are VERY few that compare, in my opinion.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:07 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Any other avid card players among your contemporaries?



There's a regular game here in Chicago that has several musicians and engineers in it. Guys who have worked with Sonic Youth, Pavement, Tortoise, Wilco, Smashing Pumpkins, and members of various rock bands. I once had to pay-off a straight flush held by the bass player of High on Fire (a Five-card draw hand no less), and I played a bit with Ed Cherny (a first-call engineer for hit records) but that's about it. The card player and music worlds don't overlap that much.


KickerNotch
(newbie)
07/03/07 03:13 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

A friend of mine has been slowly releasing some tracks he made with McNeilly from their Atlanta days together around the mid 80s, if you are interested in hearing something you might not have come across before let me know.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:40 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

My ladyfriend tells me that your original mix of In Utero was not green lighted by their label, and they went with a different mix/track list. She claims that your version is floating somewhere (she says a coworker has it on his iPod) and she's wondering how she could get a hold of it?



There were only a couple of different mixes used on the final album. Ultimately, the band made the decision about what versions they would use, though they had to suffer a combination of their own insecurity and a bunch of people at their label freaking out, which probably influenced their decision. The version of the album in the stores is the version the band wanted people to hear, and I respect that. Any "alternate version" floating around out there is either totally bogus or a generations-removed copy of a cassette dub, and not worth your attention.

Quote:

EDIT: She also would like to know the rate you charge to record at your studio? Whether you or someone else is the engineer.



Pricing is kinda complicated, depending on which studio is being used, which engineer, whether there is an assistant required, lodgings, etc. There is a session cost calculator on the rates page of the studio website. For location recording at an outside studio, I charge my normal daily rate, $650 a day. I don't charge a royalty on any record I work on, something that has caused some controversy within engineering circles.

I try to make myself as inexpensive as possible for the underground and independent bands that are my closest peers and regular clientele. For big label stuff that will require an open-ended schedule and a lot of bureaucratic nonsense to get paid, I get paid a lot more.


press.gang
(stranger)
07/03/07 03:45 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

satanic verses by milemarker was awesome.

i thought you'd done stuff with "your enemies friends" and "this moment in black history" but wikipedia doesn't have either of them listed.

question: if there was a mixer you could watch work who would it be?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:51 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Who were the worst musicians? Any guys that could barely play their instruments?



Well, very few people who can't play at all find themselves in the studio making a record. More common is a band whose expectations outstrip their abilities, even if only by a little bit. If the band's aesthetic allows their record to reflect their limitations, then it isn't much of a problem. Many great records have gaffes and clinker notes on them -- listen closely to Led Zeppelin or Crazy Horse records and you'll hear a bunch of clams. If a band wants an album with no imperfections on it, but is unable to play impeccably, then the meticulous process of piecing-together a record can be exhausting. I am grateful that the bands I work with usually don't have budgets at their disposal to make records like that, because it is torture.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:55 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

A friend of mine has been slowly releasing some tracks he made with McNeilly from their Atlanta days together around the mid 80s, if you are interested in hearing something you might not have come across before let me know.



Is this 86 material? Phantom 309?


Number27
(veteran)
07/03/07 03:58 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What is your biggest consideration when deciding which bands to work for? If you had one "do over" on either a single track or an album, which would it be and why?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:03 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

i thought you'd done stuff with "your enemies friends"



nope

Quote:

and "this moment in black history"



They did an album here last year. Cleveland represent.

Quote:

question: if there was a mixer you could watch work who would it be?



Honestly, not too interested in mixing as distinct from recording. I have always been impressed by Al Schmitt's engineering, and some Motown sessions sound impeccable. I would have loved to watch Stevie Wonder play a whole album by himself.


evasive04
(stranger)
07/03/07 04:10 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

wow, it's my first post

1. What is the best way to get into the recording industry?(If you were just starting out would you go to school, or just try to find an internship)

2. Do you find schools like full sail a waste of money?

3. How is your hearing?


billygrippo
(Piz0wn0reD!!!!!!)
07/03/07 04:13 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:



2. Do you find schools like full sail a waste of money?






i went to ex'pression: center for new media

while the school was awsome and i leanred tons and got some experience, i dont work in the field. most of my classmates do however. if you have the money id go for it but its certainly not necessary.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:20 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What is your biggest consideration when deciding which bands to work for?



Honestly, I'm not too selective. If a band wants to work with me, and I think I can do a good job, I'll put them on the schedule. The only time I'm ever suspicious is when a manager or label person contacts me rather than the band. In those instances, the band may not have even expressed an interest in me, and the whole thing may be being cooked-up by somebody else. In those cases, I always suggest that the band contact me directly so I can have a conversation with them and gauge their interest. If the band are consistently kept at arms length, then that's a tell that the whole thing is not going to happen.

Quote:

If you had one "do over" on either a single track or an album, which would it be and why?



Man, good question. There are only a few records I've worked on where I felt like I dropped the ball, and those records really bum me out, because I know that the band is only getting one shot at making their record, and they have to carry it around forever. Tomorrow, I will be making another record, but the one I did today, that band is stuck with it forever.

About 10 years ago, I did an album with an amazing German band called Wuhling, and despite working my ass off, I felt like it never sounded as good as the band were. Their previous album had been recorded by a friend of mine, and it was terrific. The record isn't bad, but the band were amazing, and they deserved an amazing record. I still wonder what I could have done differently.


cameronw01
(Sweats better than he plays)
07/03/07 04:36 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

10 songs which you've worked on for the Steve Albini best of? If 10 is too hard pick 5 or 3 or whatever.

Thanks, Cameron.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:46 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1. What is the best way to get into the recording industry?(If you were just starting out would you go to school, or just try to find an internship)



It's super cheap to buy recording equipment and start experimenting. It's super expensive to go to a recording trade school. I always recommend getting started as an amateur to see if you enjoy the process before you get into any more serious enterprise. Every town has bands that need demos recorded, so there are plenty of opportunities to experiment with no pressure and no expectations.

"Getting into the industry" is just about impossible. There are no jobs. I mean none, like zero none. Since the advent of cheap recording software, many traditional studio clients (ad agencies, film and tv productions, jingle writers and commercial music publishers) have been able to do most of their own recording in-house. Having lost much of their client base, the big institutional studios have cut their staff to the bare minimum to keep costs low, and most engineers have gone freelance. Studios that used to have dozens of in-house engineers now have only a couple.

Newer, smaller studios that cater to rock bands are usually owner-operated, sometimes by a partnership of a very few people, all of whom have some vested interest in the studio. If you are going to be a recording engineer for a living, you are either going to be freelance, or you are going to build a studio and work there.

There are audio-related jobs, in PA design and installation, touring and live sound, church, auditorium and architectural acoustics, acoustical testing and certification, broadcast engineering, etc, but there basically are no open-call staff positions for recording engineers any more.

If you are considering going into a recording program, I would strongly recommend going to a normal accredited university with a concentration in engineering, acoustics or music. Some schools offer a Tonmeister-equivalent recording program (UMass Lowell and University of Iowa used to, I don't know who does now). The for-profit trade schools (Full Sail, Recording Arts, SAE, etc) are operated as businesses where their clients are the students and the product they sell is a diploma. A degree from an accredited university carries more weight in the real world and can even get you involved in interesting graduate-level work.
Quote:

3. How is your hearing?



Good enough, apparently.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 05:03 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

10 songs which you've worked on for the Steve Albini best of? If 10 is too hard pick 5 or 3 or whatever.



Man. Another good question. Hard for me to name individual songs, so I'll mention a few whole albums I think came out well:

the Jesus Lizard, Goat
PJ Harvey Rid of Me
the Breeders Pod and Title TK
Nina Nastasia the Blackened Air
Silkworm Lifestyle or Italian Platinum
Palace/Will Oldham Viva Last Blues or Arise Therefore

The above is material that might be comprehensible to a general audience. I've made a bunch of records I like that are closer to pure noise (Whitehouse) abstract freak rock (Zeni Geva, Stinking Lizaveta, Neurosis), heavy metal (High on Fire, Zao), country music (Robbie Fulks, the Sadies), instrumental music (Shadowy Men on a Shadowy Planet, Man or Astro-Man, Don Caballero) and all sorts of other crap. All of it has its merits as music, and I'm lucky that I get to work on so much different stuff.

[edit]: I'll answer more tomorrow after my dentist appointment if there's still interest.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 05:10 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Who were the worst musicians? Any guys that could barely play their instruments?



Forgot to answer your actual question. Urge Overkill.


cameronw01
(Sweats better than he plays)
07/03/07 05:51 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

If asking two is rude then feel free to ignore this, but I figured I might as well try and push my luck.

Do you ever listen to albums or songs and just think "ugh, If I'd recorded this it could have sounded so much better, I'd have....."?

Any examples if so?


Georgia Avenue
(BBV Film Director)
07/03/07 09:34 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

This is the greatest thread in 2+2 history, not close.

Hi Mr. Albini sir,

Do you think downloading is killing the music industry or is it something else? Is rock with guitars becoming like Jazz in the 70s? Do you think bands that are severely derivative, like most garage rock bands, are inferior to bands like Jesus Lizard who sound totally unique? Can you name drop some very new or recent young bands that are carrying the torch for rock and roll? Do you find your taste for heavy noisy stuff is diminishing as you get older (mine is!) and your appreciation for quiet folksy stuff is growing?

Sorry for the barrage but im about to get on a plane to vegas. Feel free to ignore...

Thanks!

--GA


oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 10:09 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

there have been many a time i hear an album the band sounds so good, and then you see them live, and you're like, wtf is going on?

which band have you made the biggest improvement on their sound, in this manner?


TacoVendor
(journeyman)
07/03/07 11:03 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I will state up front that you are a 'micro celebrity' to only those people that have only 'micro exposure' to music. I thank you for the work you have done in the industry.

My question revolves around Martin Atkins (Public Image Ltd, Ministry, Pigface). If you don't wish to answer in the open for whatever reason then that is understood. Is he really the pretentious prick that other bands and label managers make him out to be? I have only dealt with him on one issue ever and getting a straight answer out of him was a pain, but I have heard the rumors floating about. But, they were always from people that had a 'bone to pick' with him.

As for Martins talent, there are few that can match his stage intensity and overall raw ability. One of the best out there for sure. But the off-stage persona... willing to give your thoughts?


AceLuby
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 11:08 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Are there any bands in the Chicago area that you were just like 'wow, I need to try to get these guys...'? Also, do you work w/ any jam style bands and how do you do studio work w/ those bands?

G Street
(member)
07/03/07 12:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

A few months back you did an interview w/ a friend of mine for a Scratch Acid Doc he's working on and pretty much anyone who's ever heard them will agree that Scratch Acid is/was a 'criminally underrated' band, Are there any other bands that you've worked with that you feel deserve to be heard that we may have overlooked?

P.S. I've pointed anyone who would listen to your
'The problem with Music' article, especially my friends who are musicians, thanks for the info.

and

what do you think of the iPhone?


please.muck
(member)
07/03/07 12:26 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

awesome thread

ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/03/07 12:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


P.S. I've pointed anyone who would listen to your
'The problem with Music' article, especially my friends who are musicians, thanks for the info.





Funny.. I always point my musician friends to Big Black's final tour diary, "Turkey Trot to the Sound of Tuna" or something like that. Awesome writing.

Found it: http://www.petdance.com/actionpark/bigblack/tourdiary/


oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 12:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

do you hate hippies and hippy music as much as everyone else?

KickerNotch
(newbie)
07/03/07 01:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

A friend of mine has been slowly releasing some tracks he made with McNeilly from their Atlanta days together around the mid 80s, if you are interested in hearing something you might not have come across before let me know.



Is this 86 material? Phantom 309?




I'll have to find the press packet he sent me, it's floating around somewhere. My recollection of what he is doing is somewhat fuzzy, but to my knowledge the collection he is publishing is from a combination of warehouse shows so I think the tracks are rather obscure and mostly unknown. The disc he sent me is from the "Destroy All Music Festival 2" at the Pillow Tex Wharehouse.

BTW, 24 Hour Revenge Therapy has not left my turn table since 95 and Seamonsters has never left my thoughts. It's amazing how much of my collection you were involved in.


PITTM
(You're the only person on the site whose presence annoys me. Stay out of this forum. If you post...)
07/03/07 01:13 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Vinyl or Digital?

magister ludi
(newbie)
07/03/07 01:15 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

lol.... does everybody here actually believe this is really steve albini, or am i just getting massively leveled?

sightless
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 01:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

lol.... does everybody here actually believe this is really steve albini, or am i just getting massively leveled?





why cant it be him?


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/03/07 01:24 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What do you think of this bio of you? Any specific parts you disagree with?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFMU-IFUMOI

Thanks a ton for doing this.


Oh and he needs a custom title for sure. Any ideas?


Tigermoth
(journeyman)
07/03/07 01:33 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve, you are by no means a micro celebrity. I'm stunned that this thread exists.

I've been trying to remember Stinking Lizaveta's name for months now. Thanks for that.

I saw Slint perform at ATP's Don't Look Back in England a couple years ago. I was completely blown away by a lot of the bands out there that year. I'm still handing out copies of Phillip Roebuck's album to people.

Interested in your opinion of Atkins, too. I've also heard he's a dick in real life. Can't fault his playing, though...

I've had a Big Black song stuck in my head since I saw this thread.

Feel free to ignore these questions if you feel they're too broad/boring. What do you think of the state of rock music today? Are there any bands around that you would like to work with? Are you married?

Any chance you'll be in Vegas for the WSOP this year? I'm sure a few of us would love to buy you a drink or ten.


JacksonMassey
(newbie)
07/03/07 01:44 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I got a friend who is (or at least used to be) a mod over on ProSoundWeb.com, who owns a recording studio down here in Savannah, Ga. He keeps contact with Steve on a regular basis and I have been assured that this is in fact Steve Albini. I know I'm not well known around here, either, but you could always go to ProSoundWeb and ask Steve yourself, if you're not convinced.

The thing I was told to ask to be sure is to get Steve's take on the term, "producer." If you've read any of his writing before, I'm sure you all know what's coming.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 01:58 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

If asking two is rude then feel free to ignore this, but I figured I might as well try and push my luck.



I am stunned anybody here cares, so fire away.

Quote:

Do you ever listen to albums or songs and just think "ugh, If I'd recorded this it could have sounded so much better, I'd have....."?



Only in the case of bands I'm already really familiar with and I can tell that the producer made them do some stupid nonsense or they had a bad day or whatever. I don't really think the recording is that important to a great record. Great records would be great under almost any circumstances. Mediocre records that might otherwise have been unlistenable, well, yeah, I guess it matters then. An excellent recording can make a crappy record into one that is merely unremarkable. What kind of accomplishment is that?


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/03/07 02:07 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

In vein of another question above, what classic mainstream albums of the past would you like to remix? I've always thought that a lot of Hendrix's studio stuff could have been done better.

magister ludi,

This is definitely Steve Albini. I sent him an "LOL Donkaments" shirt to an address in Chicago with the ebay username electricalaudio (his studio's name). I also read in some Tapeop article (whether it be about him or someone else talking about him) that he plays poker, so I wasn't terribly shocked to find him on 2+2.


Wilco23
(*)
07/03/07 02:13 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Being a huge Wilco fan (obviously, I'm curious if you ever worked in any capacity with them. I've heard interviews with Glenn Kotche before where he has played some of his interesting instrumentation - a song about monkeys comes to mind. Is he one of the more innovative contemporary drummers?

And, allow me to say, micro-celebrity my ass!


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 02:24 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Do you think downloading is killing the music industry or is it something else?



Downloading and the culture of free music have affected the income of record labels, but the street-level music scene (as defined by bands, entrepreneurial independent record labels, studios like mine, etc.) is doing great. Bands have an easier time than ever getting their music out into the world, and bands don't even need a label to have an international following. It's actually a great time to be in a band.

Quote:

Is rock with guitars becoming like Jazz in the 70s?



Absolutely no idea what you mean. I'll take a shot though. In the 1970s Jazz began becoming institutionalized as the music of public functions and high society. After this transformation, jazz became a funded art form, the way opera and popular classical music had been previously. Hello university jazz programs, publicly-funded jazz festivals, ad-hoc wedding entertainment, etc. That isn't happening to rock music.

Quote:

Do you think bands that are severely derivative, like most garage rock bands, are inferior to bands like Jesus Lizard who sound totally unique?



Yes. In other news, I think Ice is cold, fire is hot and the sun will probably come up tomorrow.
Quote:

Can you name drop some very new or recent young bands that are carrying the torch for rock and roll?


Dude, I hear them all the time. Just did a record for a band from Denton, Texas called Record Hop, and they were terrific. Rock bands are everywhere, and there are always a few good ones.
Quote:

Do you find your taste for heavy noisy stuff is diminishing as you get older (mine is!) and your appreciation for quiet folksy stuff is growing?



I have noticed that a bunch of people who were previously making really intense, hard rocking music have gravitated toward making moody acoustic music, and these audiences have overlapped. I still enjoy freakish noisy music, if executed with authority, and I still enjoy acoustic music likewise.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 02:33 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

there have been many a time i hear an album the band sounds so good, and then you see them live, and you're like, wtf is going on?

which band have you made the biggest improvement on their sound, in this manner?



Well, sometimes a band sets out to make a record that doesn't really sound like they do. To these bands the record is the public face of the band, and the live shows are more of an obligation than an art form, and so they are generally pretty disappointing live.

Other bands enjoy touring and express themselves onstage more than in the studio. These bands see their records as a kind of still photo of their live existence, and you can expect those bands' records to sound pretty much like their live sets. My favorite bands were always like this: the Minutemen, Wipers, Birthday Party, and my own band thinks this way, pretty much.

There are also the rare cases of bands who change from the first type to the second, and they have an obvious cutoff date after which they went from awesome to awful. Aerosmith and ZZ Top are the most obvious examples.

To answer your immediate question, Urge Overkill.


Aloysius
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 02:34 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

PJ Harvey Rid of Me




I love this album. Remember listening to WFMU in highschool and "Missed" came on and I was like "holy [censored] what the hell is this" and immediately went out and bought it.

Steve - I wasn't aware what an amazing body of work you have, just checked out your wiki. As mentioned above, thanks for your work on these albums I own alot of this stuff.

GA asked this question, one I was curious about also:

Quote:

Can you name drop some very new or recent young bands that are carrying the torch for rock and roll?




Thanks, awesome thread. Also BBV4L wins.

-Al


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 02:38 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

My question revolves around Martin Atkins (Public Image Ltd, Ministry, Pigface). If you don't wish to answer in the open for whatever reason then that is understood. Is he really the pretentious prick that other bands and label managers make him out to be? I have only dealt with him on one issue ever and getting a straight answer out of him was a pain, but I have heard the rumors floating about. But, they were always from people that had a 'bone to pick' with him.



Martin is one of the best rock drummers ever. It is a little disappointing that he isn't the full-time backbone of an awesome rock band, but instead dabbles in so many small projects. As regards his personality, I have only ever seen him be fair, generous and dedicated. It is possible somebody has a specific beef with him that I don't know anything about, but it's much more likely that some guy is talking out his ass.

I have a lot of time for guys like Martin Atkins.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 02:48 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Are there any bands in the Chicago area that you were just like 'wow, I need to try to get these guys...'?



Most bands in Chicago know how to get ahold of me, and if they're not interested in having me work on their records, I wouldn't want to put them on the spot by thrusting myself on them.
Quote:

Also, do you work w/ any jam style bands and how do you do studio work w/ those bands?



I have worked with Blues Traveler and a few other jam-type bands. Generally, they set up and play live, so they can improvise and free-ball it the way they do onstage. It's a familiar and comfortable way for me to work.

If you're asking if I 'shroom first, then no, I don't 'shroom first.


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/03/07 02:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

My question: Are you sick to death of people asking you about Big Black?

eurythmech
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 03:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

OP, I almost pm'd you a while ago to urge you to do this.
Honestly, this is a great idea.

You are very familiar to me via my infatuation with the Pixies, but have obviously heard a lot more of your work. I actually didn't know you had worked with PJ Harvey, but it felt very obvious once you mentioned Rid of Me. Of course!

On to the questions:

Do you think you helped make Gogol Bordello huge?

Do I remember you talking about "Bone Machine" from that Pixies DVD a coupl'a years back?


nyc999
(Pooh-Bah)
07/03/07 03:01 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Great thread!

My question - what's the worst you have seen in regards to the band's experience? Have you ever seen a band fall apart in the studio?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:10 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Are there any other bands that you've worked with that you feel deserve to be heard that we may have overlooked?



Great question. Off the top of my head:
Brickbat, Cordelia's Dad, Oxbow, the Cape May, Shannon Wright, Tar, Sloy, the Auteurs, Cheer Accident, Uzeda, Bokomolech, Ballydowse, Distortion Felix, Sonna, Desert Fathers... Jesus there's a bajillion of them.

Quote:

what do you think of the iPhone?



I have made it this far in life without having to carry a phone everywhere, so only extra poker functionality would get me to join the cellphone team, and word is still out.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

do you hate hippies and hippy music as much as everyone else?



Hippies themselves are pretty harmless. Hippy music, I think I hate that even more than I hate everyone else.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:13 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Vinyl or Digital?



Neither. I go straight for the vagina. You find them on women.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:16 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What do you think of this bio of you?



Extraordinarily lame. I'm guessing school project.

Quote:

Oh and he needs a custom title for sure. Any ideas?



Something that makes me more terrifying please.


ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/03/07 03:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Are there any other bands that you've worked with that you feel deserve to be heard that we may have overlooked?



Tar,




Absolutely. Steve, please send your hired goons to whatever part of Chicago they live in and browbeat them into reforming.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:22 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What do you think of the state of rock music today?



How do you play a pair of Eights?
Quote:

Are there any bands around that you would like to work with?



Any swinging dick whose checks won't bounce.
Quote:

Are you married?



You gay or something?

Quote:

Any chance you'll be in Vegas for the WSOP this year?



I hope to make it out there some year, but it will not be this one. It would be great to meet some of the irrepressible bons-vivants that frequent this site, though I am wary of POB attempts.


Tigermoth
(journeyman)
07/03/07 03:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Not gay. Chicks listen to good music sometimes, too, you know.

Do you know if Arab on Radar have considered reforming? Did you ever do anything with them?


please.muck
(member)
07/03/07 03:32 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

For your own listening pleasure, digital music (CDs) or analogue (vinyl)?

Any thoughts on the new higher sample rate/bitrate SACD or DVDA releases?

I thought the Bob Dylan and Rolling Stones remasters sound great on regular systems. Maybe SACD would be better.

thanks


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:33 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

In vein of another question above, what classic mainstream albums of the past would you like to remix? I've always thought that a lot of Hendrix's studio stuff could have been done better.



Well, mixing isn't the magic bullet it's purported to be. A recording is about 90 percent as good as it's ever going to be from the moment of the first rough playback.

Most records that have survived scrutiny for a long time have some qualities that we all associate with them, and presenting them in a new way ("better sound" or whatever) cheapens them a little, and in the case of ZZ Top's '90s remixes, turns them straight to [censored].

I worked on a new version of Cheap Trick's In Color album (not a remix, but a whole new recording), and although everyone involved liked it, it's never seen the light of day, and I can't fault that decision.

About the only "classic" record that has ever been improved-on with a new mix and master is the Who's Live at Leeds, and there is a additional album's worth of excellent extra material added.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:38 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Being a huge Wilco fan (obviously, I'm curious if you ever worked in any capacity with them.



I've known Jeff for a long time, and my girlfriend and I hang with Jeff and his family somewhat regularly, but I've never recorded Wilco. They have their own recording setup and they work in a real informal way. I tend to strap-in for a fixed duration session.

And yes, Glenn is awesome.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

My question: Are you sick to death of people asking you about Big Black?



No, it's a natural thing to ask a guy who was in Big Black. I understand. No big deal.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 03:44 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


Do you think you helped make Gogol Bordello huge?



No, their live show makes them a sensation everywhere they play, and Eugene is a totally driven guy with a superstar personality and a knack for publicity. They were going to be huge no matter what.

Quote:

Do I remember you talking about "Bone Machine" from that Pixies DVD a coupl'a years back?



Dude, I don't know what you remember. Get real.


eurythmech
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 03:56 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

lol, you post good too.

oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 04:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Being a huge Wilco fan (obviously, I'm curious if you ever worked in any capacity with them.



I've known Jeff for a long time, and my girlfriend and I hang with Jeff and his family somewhat regularly, but I've never recorded Wilco. They have their own recording setup and they work in a real informal way. I tend to strap-in for a fixed duration session.

And yes, Glenn is awesome.




any opinion on why these guys are so boring live? their recorded stuff is great.

who was the biggest pain in the ass to work with?

were there any bands you recorded that were so damn good, you wish you were in their band?

how often do you wish you were 2+2'ing instead of recording?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

what's the worst you have seen in regards to the band's experience? Have you ever seen a band fall apart in the studio?



The worst scene is when a band has a bunch of unspoken or passive/aggressive tension bubbling along in the background, but they've kept their [censored] together long enough to get into the studio. Once the session is winding down, in the last couple of days, the gloves start to come off and little complaints can turn into real freak scenes. I once saw a drummer quit a band while I was making him a cassette copy of the final master, over an argument about whether or not the last song should fade out a few seconds faster.

Obviously, that isn't why he quit. He quit because he couldn't stand being in the band, but this argument happened at a point where he could use it as cover. That's the sort of thing that I've seen happen.

[censored] like overdoses and tantrums, that only happens with childish rockstars of the type I seldom encounter.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:05 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Not gay. Chicks listen to good music sometimes, too, you know.



Not straight ones in my experience, no they don't. You are either a lesbian, a dude, or you don't really like good music. This is a fact proven with science and charts.

Quote:

Do you know if Arab on Radar have considered reforming? Did you ever do anything with them?



Ah, you're from Providence. Okay. That explains everything. Forget what I said about the lesbian thing. You were probably just experimenting in college. But short hair looks good on skinny girls.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:16 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

For your own listening pleasure, digital music (CDs) or analogue (vinyl)?



If I'm going to put on a record for pleasure, it will be a vinyl record, unless I'm at work. Understand though that I listen to original masters all day every day, and so I'm less likely than most people to want to throw on an album when I knock-off at midnight or whatever.

Quote:

Any thoughts on the new higher sample rate/bitrate SACD or DVDA releases?



Doesn't matter, since both formats are now dead, but I think a greater bit depth (24 bits is plenty) grants a bigger quality improvement than increasing the sample rate. The downloadable version of the new album from my band (Shellac of North America) is available in compressed formats, but also 16-bit or 24-bit 44.1kHz versions. We did it as an experiment to see if anybody appreciates having it available.

Quote:

I thought the Bob Dylan and Rolling Stones remasters sound great on regular systems. Maybe SACD would be better.



No, I'm pretty sure they're still going to have Dylan and the Stones on them.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:27 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

who was the biggest pain in the ass to work with?



That would be Urge Overkill.

Quote:

were there any bands you recorded that were so damn good, you wish you were in their band?



Yeah, I wanted to be in the Jesus Lizard and Fugazi after about ten seconds. In either case it would have made the band more lame though.

Quote:

how often do you wish you were 2+2'ing instead of recording?



Maybe a better question is how often does the band have to wait for me to finish reading a BBV post before they can do another take? Happens every day.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Should have proof-read this post above. It should read:
Quote:


There are also the rare cases of bands who change from the second type to the first, and they have an obvious cutoff date after which they went from awesome to awful. Aerosmith and ZZ Top are the most obvious examples.




No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/03/07 04:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

My question: Are you sick to death of people asking you about Big Black?



No, it's a natural thing to ask a guy who was in Big Black. I understand. No big deal.




Awesome. So, obviously my next question is...
HU for rollz?

And WTF happened with Urge Overkill? Sounds like a HELL of a story...


T.J. Combo
(C-C-C-COMBO BREAKER)
07/03/07 04:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do you ever have people recognize you and run up to you in public and start gushing about how they loved your work with _______?

If I recognized you at the grocery store, and I had a broken arm and wanted you to sign my cast, would you?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:33 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

So, basically I wore you all out. Okay.

I'll check in from time to time.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:38 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Awesome. So, obviously my next question is...
HU for rollz?



I'll flip you for $40 on FT table Guru right now. Type urge overkill in chat and I'll sit in.


Quanah Parker
(Pooh-Bah)
07/03/07 04:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Thank you for Mclusky Do Dallas!
I could rave on and on about this album and many of your recordings.

What do you think of the chopping and screwing mixes of hip hop music?
Does this type of remix have any future in rock?

Also, should I ever fold KK preflop? (just joking, but I'm so glad to see you're a poker player.)


skunkworks
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 04:42 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Maybe a better question is how often does the band have to wait for me to finish reading a BBV post before they can do another take? Happens every day.






Edit: Also, thanks for the only good "Ask Me" thread in BBV. You know, OOT is recruiting...


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/03/07 04:43 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Awesome. So, obviously my next question is...
HU for rollz?



I'll flip you for $40 on FT table Guru right now. Type urge overkill in chat and I'll sit in.




Damn! I'm at work. I'll take a rain check, if we're ever on at the same time some night.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 04:43 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Do you ever have people recognize you and run up to you in public and start gushing about how they loved your work with _______?

If I recognized you at the grocery store, and I had a broken arm and wanted you to sign my cast, would you?



Happens once in a great while. Once my girlfriend got asked for her autograph, so it probably happens to everybody once in a while by accident.


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/03/07 04:49 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

KURT COBAIN: Hey Steve, I was wondering if you could turn up the gui...

STEVE ALBINI: Jesus Kurt, hold on. Grimstarr just tilted off $500k and I can't stop dreaming of Patrik Antonius.

(Insert incredibly offensive suicide by shotgun joke here.)


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 05:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Thank you for McClusky Do Dallas!



Super great funny band.
Quote:

What do you think of the chopping and screwing mixes of hip hop music?



I have heard the DJ Skrew version of Big Moe's City of Syrup, and that record is extraordinary and f'd up. Almost everything else I've heard like that has been lame and typical, so I think that's the one good one right there.

Quote:

Does this type of remix have any future in rock?



Oddly enough, some bands ask for specific Skrew-isms (super-low speed vocal takes, brutal disruptive edits) and they seldom work very well. Similar to when the 808 bass drum sample was all the rage, and usually just sounded stupid and tacked-on.

Quote:

Also, should I ever fold KK preflop?



Folded Queens to a big four-bet when 200+BB deep (but covered by a guy who could squeeze) full ring the other day and got into a beef with Pavaveda about it. He was all "how do you magically put him on KK+" and I was all "dude shut up you play limit HE shorthanded" and he was all "you have 34 percent equity against their ranges" and I was all "dude shut up I have two outs that aren't the nuts and I'm not playing for my stack with two outs and you're wrong about those ranges" and he was all "I disagree" and I was all "dude shut up."


whale_hunter
(member)
07/03/07 05:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

So, basically I wore you all out. Okay.

I'll check in from time to time.




I think most people are just trying not to bombard you. I have a que of about 500 questions waiting...:)

Let's say I live just north of Chicago (which I do) and am a fellow poker player (which I am) and want to sit in the studio with you one day.

Chances?

If you tell me one in a million, i'll take that as a positive.
So be careful.

P.S. You going to The Taste?


PITTM
(You're the only person on the site whose presence annoys me. Stay out of this forum. If you post...)
07/03/07 05:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Can you tell us what your home audio system consists of? Be specific plz <3

PITTM
(You're the only person on the site whose presence annoys me. Stay out of this forum. If you post...)
07/03/07 05:08 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Also, thanks for the only good "Ask Me" thread in BBV. You know, OOT is recruiting...




WPOTY.


skunkworks
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 05:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

PITTM (Penis In The Mouth), you should totally lodge a complaint about me in ATF.

O Fen�meno
(i can't correctly pronounce your name)
07/03/07 05:24 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you heard any Wolfmother? If so what do you think of them?

NT!
(****)
07/03/07 05:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


Ah, you're from Providence. Okay. That explains everything. Forget what I said about the lesbian thing. You were probably just experimenting in college. But short hair looks good on skinny girls.





this thread is so [censored] fantastic, thank you sir

can you comment on recording '24 hour revenge therapy'? that album sounds really different to me from the other jawbreaker albums, which probably has a lot to do with blake's surgery, different songs, etc. but also just the atmosphere of the album is great. anything you can say about the experience, or what those guys were like would be awesome.

what did you think when you heard 'dear you'? there are some great songs on that record but i thought it was brutally overproduced.

oh one other thing, i noticed you didn't mention damon che among the great drummers you've worked with? what was it like recording him?

sorry if this is a lot of questions


manpower
(old hand)
07/03/07 05:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve,

Do you do any mastering work and how valuable is it to a recording? Do you have a take on the so called 'loudness war'?


FastPlaySlow
(old hand)
07/03/07 05:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

1. You are in the BB and unknown player makes a standard button raise. Do you 3-bet AJs/AJo/AQs/AQo? What about AT?
2. Same scenario as above except this time you have a small or mid PP.
3. UTG+1 opens, BTN calls, you are in the BB with 22/77/TT. Do you 3-bet?
4. You open OTB with 66 and average aggro TAG 3-bets in the BB. Do you call?


1. You open in the CO and BB calls. The flop is 9s 6c 2s. You cbet and get called. How often and on what cards do you 2nd barrel? (assume you have no hand no draw)
2. Same scenario as above except the flop is T55r.
3. Same scenario as above except the flop is 632r.
4. Same scenario as above except the flop is Q72r.
5. Same scenario as above except the flop is Kh Jh Tc.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 05:36 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Let's say I live just north of Chicago (which I do) and am a fellow poker player (which I am) and want to sit in the studio with you one day.



There's a phone number on the studio website. You use the telephone to call it. That's the thing right there on the desk next to your computer.

Quote:

P.S. You going to The Taste?



I've had my quota of REO Speedwagon and Buddy Guy for the year, so I'll pass thanks. Big public scenes full of white hats, guidos and suburban blues fan dorks... no thanks. I'd rather have my nuts crushed in a vise.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 05:44 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Can you tell us what your home audio system consists of? Be specific plz <3



Not all put together at the moment, but here's what I got:

VPI record cleaner (incredible, I recommend it)
Studer linear-tracking TT (to be replaced by a VPI JR)
Ortofon cartridge (to be replaced by a pair of bayonet headshells, one with a Shure VR15X and one with a Sumiko Blue Point "nude" special)
Hagerman Bugle phono preamp
Marantz integrated amp (to be replaced by a home-made tube amp once I get off my ass and finish it)
Custom Linnaeum-tweeter speakers with reflex bass cabinets. No model number, but made by Linnaeum with Focal drivers.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 05:46 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Have you heard any Wolfmother? If so what do you think of them?



They're okay. On the whole, I'd rather listen to Dead Meadow.


oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/03/07 05:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

how many musicians have you nailed?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 06:16 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hey Steve,

Do you do any mastering work and how valuable is it to a recording? Do you have a take on the so called 'loudness war'?



mastering is the last step before CDs or records are mass-produced. Lately there has been a trend toward making records "loud" at this stage by compressing and clipping the audio for a more aggressive sound. I am of the opinion that the record shouldn't leave the studio until it is pretty close to exactly what the band want, and consequently I prefer more judicious mastering.

If a record needs aggressive mastering to "save" it, then aggressive mastering isn't enough to save it. Given a choice between sound quality and apparent loudness, I will side with sound quality every time.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 06:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

This quiz is probably going to expose how much of a fish I am, but I'll try to answer it off the top of my head.

Quote:

1. You are in the BB and unknown player makes a standard button raise. Do you 3-bet AJs/AJo/AQs/AQo? What about AT?



Call AT AJ, three-ball AQ+ and donk any low or Ace flop.

Quote:

2. Same scenario as above except this time you have a small or mid PP.



Three-ball anything bigger than Fives. Call other PP. Check sets and big card flops. Donk middle card flops. Check-raise flops where I make a draw that also have an Ace.

Quote:

3. UTG+1 opens, BTN calls, you are in the BB with 22/77/TT. Do you 3-bet?




Not usually. TT+ occasionally I will reraise a healthy amount, but small pairs I'm hoping to bust somebody with a set.

Quote:

4. You open OTB with 66 and average aggro TAG 3-bets in the BB. Do you call?



Not usually. This isn't a great gamble if he's for-real tight and won't go broke with one pair. Also, very few flops will help my hand.

Quote:

1. You open in the CO and BB calls. The flop is 9s 6c 2s. You cbet and get called. How often and on what cards do you 2nd barrel? (assume you have no hand no draw)



Second barrel depends on history with opponent, but probably half the time I bet any Nine and non-spade Aces, Kings. Maybe other non-straight cards if I get weird hair.
Quote:

2. Same scenario as above except the flop is T55r.



I'll probably check behind here. Maybe bluff an Ace.
Quote:

3. Same scenario as above except the flop is 632r.



I'll bet any big cards, depending on opponent's trapping tendencies, about a third of the time, and the bet will be pretty big. One pair and a draw, set or made straight are his most likely hands, and I'm hoping to fold the pair+draw hands and find out if I'm drawing dead otherwise. Less often he has a medium overpair, and won't like the continued aggression.
Quote:

4. Same scenario as above except the flop is Q72r.



Check behind about always. He has a weak queen or a set and isn't folding often.
Quote:

5. Same scenario as above except the flop is Kh Jh Tc.



I'd have to make a pretty big bet here if I'm going to bother, and that would probably be about 10 percent of the time.


Biosludge
(enthusiast)
07/03/07 06:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve thanks for doing this, in a completely heterosexual way I want to sex you.

No I am not gay or something.

How was working with Smog (Bill Callahan), if you remember?


Wondercall
(old hand)
07/03/07 07:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

What do you think of The Mars Volta?


PITTM
(You're the only person on the site whose presence annoys me. Stay out of this forum. If you post...)
07/03/07 07:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

PITTM (Penis In The Mouth), you should totally lodge a complaint about me in ATF.




if you dont say retarded [censored] i have no complaints. its your call baby.


CallMeIshmael
(The Canadian Colbert)
07/03/07 07:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

"In the Aeroplane over the Sea" - great album, or the greatest album?


Mondogarage
(veteran)
07/03/07 07:53 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

lol.... does everybody here actually believe this is really steve albini, or am i just getting massively leveled?





why cant it be him?




I happen to know for a fact he plays poker, since a former DC acquaintance of mine has played in his game a couple of times. By his responses, no reason to doubt him at all.


Mondogarage
(veteran)
07/03/07 08:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Will you be working with The Sadies again, down the road?

Also, having worked with The Wedding Present at the height of their powers, what are your thoughts on Take Fountain?

Thanks, best thread ever.


JohnMo
(newbie)
07/03/07 08:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Is Pet Sounds by the Beach Boys really as good as Paul McCartney says it is?

nath
(the second coming of the second coming)
07/03/07 10:46 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

any opinion on why these guys are so boring live?



i actually gotta say the best live concert i ever saw was a wilco show. but there were a few big confluent factors that went into that.


Commuter
(journeyman)
07/03/07 11:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do you have a good Kurt story that you could share?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/03/07 11:44 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

How was working with Smog (Bill Callahan), if you remember?



Blll is a super funny guy and he makes great records. I wish i had the opportunity to work on more of them.


KickerNotch
(newbie)
07/04/07 12:45 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Vinyl or Digital?



Was this refering to my post?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 01:05 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What do you think of The Mars Volta?



I don't think I've ever thought of the Mars Volta.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 01:18 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Will you be working with The Sadies again, down the road?



They are great friends and I will gladly work with them any time they ask.


thespoil
(journeyman)
07/04/07 02:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you ever worked on a record that turned out so poor you asked for your name to be left out of the credits?

What were the Gub sessions like?


Number27
(veteran)
07/04/07 02:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I know I've already asked two questions but this thread rocks.

1) If a hundred years from now people could only hear one album you worked on which would it be?
2) If you could create a dream band who would you select?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 02:49 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Have you ever worked on a record that turned out so poor you asked for your name to be left out of the credits?



I am actually indifferent to being credited in any case. I make a lot of records, and a band putting my name on their record is inviting associations that they may not think are valid, and categorizing themselves in a way. I think it's nice that bands want to thank me for the work, but in most cases I think they'd be better off taking all the credit themselves and not mentioning me at all.

So no, I've never asked not to be mentioned, but I have a general preference for not being mentioned, in consideration of the band.

Quote:

What were the Gub sessions like?



Pretty ad-hoc. The two drummers, Bill Reiflin and Martin Atkins, played on everything, but the rest of the music was dependent on who they invited to participate on a given track. A lot of it was improvised. It was a pretty loose way of working, and it could have been a disaster. A lot of things done that way are.


cameronw01
(Sweats better than he plays)
07/04/07 02:50 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

By the way, since I first read this thread I can't stop listening to my old Pixies, Urge Overkill and McLusky CDs.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 03:25 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1) If a hundred years from now people could only hear one album you worked on which would it be?



For my own tastes, probably Goat by the Jesus Lizard. What an awesome band. They were just about perfect for their first five years.

Quote:

2) If you could create a dream band who would you select?



That's a pretty meaningless question. Some musicians are terrific at one style or idiom of music, but clumsy at others. Some people have a distinctive style that they have developed a whole style of music around, but are not technically "good" in general terms. In particular, vocalists and guitarists can use abstract sound and timbre to great effect, without being particularly concerned about things like timing and pitch. In their own music, these effects can be perfect, but in any other setting, they would be ugly and inappropriate.

So, I have some favorite musicians, but they would probably make an awful band together.

Drummers: too many to count, all brilliant.
Bass: Tony Maimone, Barry Adamson, David Wm. Sims, Tracy Pew
Guitar: Also quite a few. Keith Levine, Wilco Johnson, Billy Gibbons, Malcolm Young, Andy Cohen, Robert Quine, Shannon Wright, Yanni Papadopoulos...


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 04:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

oh one other thing, i noticed you didn't mention damon che among the great drummers you've worked with? what was it like recording him?



He's an awesome, inventive drummer, but he has been personally irresponsible and put some dear friends in harm's way, so I don't generally think highly of him. Incredible drummer though. He has invented techniques and effects for his playing that are distinctive and uniquely his. I have to respect that, regardless of what else he's done.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 04:52 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

how many musicians have you nailed?



Had to do some research and cyphering. I think it's about a dozen.


Quanah Parker
(Pooh-Bah)
07/04/07 02:37 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

how many musicians have you nailed?



Had to do some research and cyphering. I think it's about a dozen.



At the same time?
Awesome!

Ok, seriously.
Do you have any favorite "toys" you're really digging right now? (Musicial or otherwise.)


turnipmonster
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/04/07 04:10 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I know you said upstream that you don't listen to a lot of music on your time off, but do you have any favorite music that would surprise us? like gamelan or something?

also, you worked with ken vandermark on a portastatic record, what do you think of him? thoughts about the chicago avant garde scene in general?

also, what do you think about jeff parker, and have you worked with him much? I really loved his playing on the new hamid drake/fred anderson record and had never heard of him before, that's why I'm asking.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 04:19 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Do you have any favorite "toys" you're really digging right now? (Musicial or otherwise.)



Kevin from Electrical Guitar Company is making some incredible guitars right now. Beautiful workmanship, they sound incredible, and he'll custom make anything you ask for. There's a new low-power Orange guitar amp called the Tiny Terror that is great for recording and is really versatile. I'm still really into the David Josephson microphones, specifically the e22S (which we had a hand in designing) and the C700 (awesome vocalist microphone).


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 04:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I know you said upstream that you don't listen to a lot of music on your time off, but do you have any favorite music that would surprise us? like gamelan or something?



Recently I've been listening to the collected recordings of Washington Phillips. So beautiful. I've been a lifelong fan of Willie Nelson, and I probably listen to more mountain music than you would imagine. For "serious music," I love listening to Gorecky, Glenn Gould and Phillip Glass. I particularly like Gould's voice montage recordings like "the Idea of North." Other 20th Century egghead avant garde music I like, but is much more of an intellectual stimulation (rather than a passive listening experience): Christian Marclay, Alvin Lucier, Conlon Nancarrow and Iannis Xenakis being particlar favorites. For makeout music, you can't beat Bill Withers and Clarence Carter.

Quote:

also, you worked with ken vandermark on a portastatic record, what do you think of him? thoughts about the chicago avant garde scene in general?



Bob Weston has worked with this scene a lot more than I have, but it's pretty ubiquitous here. There's a core of about 12 players who make up about 30 ensembles, depending on who booked the gig or who the guest soloist is. I don't mind improvised music, and some of the players are truly great (Hamid Drake is an astounding drummer, for example), but sometimes the whole avant Jazz scene seems like a race to see who can accumulate the most hours of stage time, and since the core of players is so familiar, it's hard to have a unique experience at one of these shows. These guys are also at their best when a visiting free music dignitary is in town and they're trying to impress him.

All of this sounds more flippant than it should, because these guys are dedicated to this music, but, like most things, either this is your scene and you like it already, or it isn't your scene and you're probably going to hate it.

Quote:

also, what do you think about jeff parker, and have you worked with him much? I really loved his playing on the new hamid drake/fred anderson record and had never heard of him before, that's why I'm asking.



Jeff is a great player, and he plays in the band Tortoise and several occasional outfits of the type I described.


turnipmonster
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/04/07 05:26 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

few more questions I don't think have been asked already. you make a lot of records, how often do you know when a record you are making is going to be really effing great? any surprises, times you have thought the record sucked but heard it later and thought it was great? how often in general do you hear the records you've made after you're done?

sorry if this is too many questions, really cool that you are doing this thread.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/04/07 06:36 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

how often do you know when a record you are making is going to be really effing great?



Another very good question.

There is a sort of clinical distance I have to maintain as an engineer that precludes forming an opinion about the music I'm working on. If I'm getting wrapped up in the music like a fan, then I'm not paying proper attention to the technical side, the way the equipment is behaving, etc.

I've used this analogy before, but I like it, so I'll use it again: While the recording is underway, I'm like a gynecologist, and it would be inappropriate for me to be getting turned-on by the vagina I'm working on at the moment. I need to have a different relationship with the vagina.

Imagine for a moment that I did allow myself to harbor opinions about how good a record was while I was making it. Two bands come into the studio, one of which I really like, and one whose music I dislike. It wouldn't be fair to that second band for me to let my distaste for their music affect the job I did, and that would be inevitable.

Also, all records aren't being made (ought not to be made) to suit me alone. My tastes are really [censored] up, and if I tried to make records to suit myself, rather than the band's tastes, I would make a lot of freakish records that nobody liked and didn't suit the band.

So, in order to maintain a professional level of concentration on the task at hand, and to allow the band to make a record that represents them accurately, I try not to even think about whether or not I like the record. Having said that, sometimes everybody can tell that a record is going to be awesome anyway, and of the records I've worked on that ended up being really great, the majority of them showed their greatness in the first couple of hours of work.

If there is something unique and subtle about a band that makes them great, then sometimes it takes longer exposure to become aware of it, but in general everybody can tell right away.

Quote:

any surprises, times you have thought the record sucked but heard it later and thought it was great? how often in general do you hear the records you've made after you're done?



I probably get to hear 10 percent of the records I work on after everything wraps. Usually they sound about like I remember them, but I have often been surprised that an opinion I held at the time of the session (the guitar is too loud, the vocals are too quiet, this song is a turkey...) end up being completely incorrect. For this reason I am not the least bit insistent when the band and I disagree on a matter of taste. I know for sure that I am fallible, and I know the band is more familiar with their own music than I am. When in doubt, do it their way.

I did an album in the 90s for the band Bush, after they had had a couple of big hits already. While we were working on their second album, they kept pursuing a particular song that I thought was a the weakest and most derivative of the whole set of songs we were working on. A complete dog. Whenever they asked my opinion, I would admit that this particular song struck me as disposable, and they should concentrate on other stuff.

In the end, they did a version they liked, which I still thought was a turkey, and the song "Swallowed" was released as the first single from the album.

It was also their first Number One hit single. I apparently know nothing about what makes for hit records.

Gavin Rossdale, singer of the band, forgave me enough to invite me to his wedding to Gwen Stefani, where my girlfriend was able to pocket all kinds of "Gwen&Gavin" monogrammed trinkets, none of which have yet made it to eBay.


ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/04/07 07:45 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Enough with the music. Post your graph for the year, and your pokertracker stats.

RiverFenix
(faking winning cars)
07/04/07 09:20 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Very awesome thread. Thanks for finding 2p2 and doing this.

samuraiphotog
(stranger)
07/04/07 10:03 PM
spill!

Would you mind sharing how you felt the first time you played in a live poker game? Was it as exhilarating as playing a really good show with Shellac?

0evg0
(SSNL HU champion '07)
07/04/07 10:15 PM
Re: spill!

What do you think about the commercialization or "selling out" done by bands in the indie scene, such as licensing songs for movies, TV shows, and corporate commercials? I feel there's good and bad to it as hearing "Where Is My Mind?" at the end of Fight Club led to me discovering the rest of their catalogue, but at the same time hearing the New Pornographers at the close of a commercial for the University of Phoenix Online was kinda weird and something I could do without.

Then there's the actual economic vs. art debate on it too.


rubbrband
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/05/07 12:19 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Pro tools or logic? explain plz.

Max Raker
(old hand)
07/05/07 04:18 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Why do you think you have become famous (in a relative sense) for doing something that ususally doesn't make a person a household name. How much of this was your skill in engineering vs. luck. vs recording really good bands.

Who have you worked with that you felt had the best understanding of recording?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 05:00 AM
Re: spill!

Quote:

Would you mind sharing how you felt the first time you played in a live poker game? Was it as exhilarating as playing a really good show with Shellac?



I have played poker since I was a kid, so if home games count, I played my first money game while in high school, around 1976, and I have had a semi-regular game to play in since I was in college. My first trip to a sanctioned game with a dealer and everything was pretty cool, but not really life-changing.

The first time I played in an underground card room was more interesting. I was in New York for a conference, and I played at a club (at the time I think it was called the Broadway). I didn't know what to expect, and I was pleased that it was pretty normal. It was neat to see actual degenerates in an actual illegal gambling club. I also won a little money, which bolstered the evening.

Playing poker is great, but not really anything like playing in a band. I try to be pretty inconspicuous at the poker table, and If I don't know anybody, I would rather not have the other players thinking about me and what I'm doing. Playing onstage with a band is to the contrary, quite conspicuous, and I hope what I'm doing is communicating something.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 05:15 AM
Re: spill!

Quote:

What do you think about the commercialization or "selling out" done by bands in the indie scene, such as licensing songs for movies, TV shows, and corporate commercials?



This is a pretty big topic.

A band that willingly associates itself with some commercial enterprise is attaching itself forever to that business and everything that business does. If a band abdicates that decision to a third party, then the band is admitting that its music doesn't mean enough as art to be protected from such associations.

There is also a distinction to be made between music made for its own sake (say for records) and music made for hire for commercial use, which seems like a completely different kind of music to me. Companies choose to use the first kind of music (let's call it "real" music) because the band, the music and the audience have cultural significance that the advertiser wants to co-opt and attach to a product or movie or whatever.

There are very few circumstances where using the first kind of music (let's call it real music) as a cultural lubricant for commercial intercourse doesn't creep me out a little bit, and I tend to think less of people who sell out their art, their reputations and their audience this way.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 05:17 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Pro tools or logic? explain plz.



I don't use computers to make records. I use tape machines, like nature intended. I use computers for correspondence, arguments, poker and porn.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 05:49 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Why do you think you have become famous (in a relative sense) for doing something that ususally doesn't make a person a household name. How much of this was your skill in engineering vs. luck. vs recording really good bands.



Almost any competent engineer could have done what I have. I have been incredibly lucky to be working in a music scene that spawned a huge number of distinctive, talented bands, and I made myself available to them. There is no doubt in my mind that I get some credit I didn't earn, for working on records that were going to be incredible no matter who was in the chair at the time.

There are a few things about my approach in the studio that I think have made a positive contribution to the records I work on. I come from a band background myself, so I'm sympathetic to bands, and I understand how they work, both internally and in relation to the outside world. I know that asking a band to do things differently in the studio than they would onstage or in the practice room is bound to make them uncomfortable, and is not going to make them play well, so I try to let them play as normally as possible.

I also respect the decisions the band makes about their own music: What it should sound like, how fast it should be, etc. Whenever I hear that a producer made a band add a chorus or shorten a solo or tack-on a string section, my blood boils a little.

I also pride myself on being a bargain. A lot of people in my position try to maximize their income on every project, and eventually they price themselves out of the scene where all the good music is, and end up doing a few sessions a year for music that totally sucks. By keeping my rates reasonable, I get to work with all the good bands, not just those who have money and hype behind them at the moment.

The other thing I have is experience. I've made an assload of records, and any problem that's ever going to come up in a session, I've probably already figured out how to solve it or defend against it. I can work more efficiently than a lot of engineers because I'm not guessing and I'm virtually never stumped.

As percentage, I'd say my own contribution and tendencies are about ten percent of the value of my job. Eighty percent is the band and their abilities and ten percent is luck and market forces. That's a wild guess.

Quote:

Who have you worked with that you felt had the best understanding of recording?



Excellent question.

I think any band has a pretty good handle on things by their third album or so, and they can start to anticipate the technical considerations. Bands with recording engineers in them are a little quicker in that regard. Neurosis and the New Year are probably the most studio-savvy bands I've worked with, in that they often have pretty specific studio techniques in mind for individual songs.


Diamond Lie
(Pooh-Bah)
07/05/07 06:09 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What are the remaining members of Silkworm doing nowadays since Michael's departure. What in your opinion is their best song?

donfairplay
(journeyman)
07/05/07 06:31 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Just wanted to say thanks for this thread. You seem very humble about your accomplishments. Even better, you seem like a decent cash game player. I really liked your recommendations of The Jesus Lizard and Dead Meadow, never heard of them before this thread. I've been listening to them on Yahoo Music's subscription service for the past day or two.

Do bands get a fee or residual for having their songs released on the major online subscription services? (ex: Yahoo, Rhapsody, Napster) I'd like to think I'm supporting the bands, but I can't see how thousands of bands can live off of my measly $6 a month subscription. As a band member yourself, do you have an opinion on the subscription services versus, say, pay-per-song itunes?

My question seems kind of strange now that I type it out... I just wanted to say thanks for the Dead Meadow reccommendation!


bdk3clash
(Read me first)
07/05/07 11:12 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

As a Chicagoan and a gambler, please lay odds on the following happening:

-Chicago is named host of the 2016 Olympics
-Chicago gets a casino within the next 10 years
-The Cubs win the World Series within the next 10 years

Did you read Michael Azerrad's Our Band Could Be Your Life? If so, what did you think of it, and of the Big Black chapter in particular?

(Side question: Were the Butthole Surfers hands-down the craziest band of that era, as the book seems to imply? If they weren't, who was?)

Which Chicago rock critic is a bigger douchebag; Bill Wyman, Jim DeRogatis, Greg Kot, or someone else?

What do you think of Pitchfork Magazine?

Read any good books/seen any good movies lately?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 03:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What are the remaining members of Silkworm doing nowadays since Michael's departure. What in your opinion is their best song?



Michael getting killed was pretty horrible for everyone here in Chicago. He was such a sweet guy, and involved in so many cool projects that just about everybody was directly affected.

Tim Midgett [edit: a decent poker player who plays in the Tuesday game sometimes] and Andy Cohen are in a new band, Bottomless Pit, who have a very good record coming out momentarily.

Best Silkworm song? Man, they have a million, and none are clinkers. "That's Entertainment," "Contempt," "I Hope You Don't Survive," "Young," "Don't Make Plans on Friday," "LR75," "Into the Woods," "Couldn't You Wait"... So many great great songs.


bdk3clash
(Read me first)
07/05/07 03:17 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What do you think of Pitchfork Magazine?



Apologies for the incorrect URL for Pitchfork I provided in my previous post. (Above link is correct.)


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 03:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Do bands get a fee or residual for having their songs released on the major online subscription services? (ex: Yahoo, Rhapsody, Napster)



There is some tiny royalty paid, but it's hardly going to be anybody's bread-and-butter.

Quote:

I'd like to think I'm supporting the bands, but I can't see how thousands of bands can live off of my measly $6 a month subscription. As a band member yourself, do you have an opinion on the subscription services versus, say, pay-per-song itunes?



You are supporting the band by being a fan. Over the course of your life, you'll have many opportunities to buy records, Tee shirts, concert tickets and the like. Don't worry about your downloading/listening habits. The bands are happy that anyone is listening at all, and they will make a little money off you over time. They're glad they're in the game and that someone is listening.

Quote:

My question seems kind of strange now that I type it out... I just wanted to say thanks for the Dead Meadow reccommendation!



If you like Dead Meadow, try Om, Sunn0))), High Rise, and older bands like Blue Cheer and Budgie. If you like the Jesus Lizard, you're stuck with only them, because nobody else comes close.


rleidle
(journeyman)
07/05/07 04:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

You seem to have a bit of disdain for improvised music. Have you ever recorded a Jazz album? If so what was your experience like?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 05:07 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

As a Chicagoan and a gambler, please lay odds on the following happening:

-Chicago is named host of the 2016 Olympics
-Chicago gets a casino within the next 10 years
-The Cubs win the World Series within the next 10 years



I am not a gambler, honestly. I play poker, and I will play games for stakes (I am a fish at Nine-ball, a shortstop in one-pocket, decent at three-cushion), but I don't like betting on things where my only edge comes from other people or objects performing as I hope they will.

That said, I used to offer Novotny a standing 5:1 on the Cubs making the post season and I made pretty good money over the years.

The rest, meh. I don't know.

Quote:

Did you read Michael Azerrad's Our Band Could Be Your Life? If so, what did you think of it, and of the Big Black chapter in particular?



Here's what I wrote about it in a thread on the Electrical Audio forums:

Quote:

There is a problem with any book like this. It is written by someone who wasn't there. He's trying to convey the importance of a culture that was really a series of individual events, each one of them unique and life-changing for anybody actually there at the time, but impossible to convey to someone who wasn't.

He's also telling the life story of a peer group that includes me, a bunch of my friends, and our counterparts around the world. It is impossible to write a book that includes an important part of my life that will not be read by me with some suspicion. I was there, he wasn't. Inevitably, he will look like an idiot some of the time.

That said, I liked the chapter on the Minutemen.




Quote:

(Side question: Were the Butthole Surfers hands-down the craziest band of that era, as the book seems to imply? If they weren't, who was?)



If you weren't there to see it, you might not believe it, but there were a lot of really effed-up bands in the 1980s, and the Buttholes weren't even particularly weird in context. Mudhead, Pile of Cows, Sloppage, the Thrown-Ups and the whole Bay Area scenes surrounding SRL and the Idiot... Now that was some weird right there.

The Butthole Surfers were easily the most selfish, childish little pricks in that scene, but not the weirdest.

Quote:

Which Chicago rock critic is a bigger douchebag; Bill Wyman, Jim DeRogatis, Greg Kot, or someone else?



Well, Jim DeRogatis is clearly the biggest, and Wyman no longer even pretends to cover Chicago, so he's immaterial. Kot generally has his heart in the right place, though he does fall for sucker bait like the Polyphonic Spree and the like. The dumbest professional music writer in Chicago though is a retard named Jessica Hopper, whose writing is simultaneously sophomoric, vapid and excruciatingly self-satisfied. It is literally impossible to glean any actual content or criticism from her writing, which is an achievement of some sort, I suppose.

Quote:

What do you think of Pitchfork Magazine?



I virtually never think of Pitchfork Magazine.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 05:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

You seem to have a bit of disdain for improvised music. Have you ever recorded a Jazz album? If so what was your experience like?



Oh no, not in the slightest, and I record free players as session guys pretty regularly. It almost never lives up to its promise, but I like the idea of improvised music a lot, and experience as improvisers makes musicians better able to handle extemporaneous stuff in other studio contexts. The players in that scene are uniformly excellent, and recording them is easy and it usually sounds good.

What I am suffering is more fatigue from an established improv scene in Chicago that has a fairly set demeanor. If you're a regular at these shows, you'll understand when I say that there aren't a lot of surprises, despite everything being supposedly "free."


arbuthnot
(journeyman)
07/05/07 05:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I'll start with just three. I may have more later depending on how these go. Thanks for doing this btw.

1. You mentioned that you play in a regular poker game. Who is the best player in that game?

2. On a scale of one-thousand to ten-thousand squirrels, how much to you like/love to play poker?

3. According to the documentary about you, posted earlier in the thread, some people have labeled you a misogynist. With that said, do you think women make good poker players and could a woman ever be a worthwhile president of the U.S.?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 06:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1. You mentioned that you play in a regular poker game. Who is the best player in that game?



Limit HE: a guy named Russ. His only real competition is a guy named Devin who probably gets more value from bad players, but in a tough ring game, Russ probably wins more/loses less.

Mixed games, stud games and Swingo: me

NLHE: Devin by a country mile. He takes advantage of every weakness he sees, usually perfectly balancing his play against observant players.

Omaha: Don't be ridiculous, nobody is better than anybody else at this goofy game.

My personal nemesis: Sean. Has me clocked perfectly.

Quote:

2. On a scale of one-thousand to ten-thousand squirrels, how much to you like/love to play poker?



Easy 7kS. Easy. On a tear, I could go the whole 10kS.

Quote:

3. According to the documentary about you, posted earlier in the thread, some people have labeled you a misogynist. With that said, do you think women make good poker players and could a woman ever be a worthwhile president of the U.S.?



There are so few women in any "sporting" enterprise it may take a long time for them to get a fair accounting. It is unfortunate that the ones with big teats and yappers get all the attention, since they are clearly not the best. I would welcome many of the "female pros" I see play online or on television in our Tuesday game, though Jen Harman is clearly world class, and I have sweated some excellent online players who turned out to be female.

As for President, whatever. It'll be thirty years or more before we've undone the damage of the last eight, so who gets elected this time doesn't really matter in the medium term, as long as it isn't another Republican.


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/05/07 06:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Was Phil Spector as innovative and important as Rolling Stone says he is?

I have already asked a few so feel free to ignore if you don't have the time or just don't feel like answering.


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/05/07 06:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I forgot the most important question...White Sox or Cubs?

Please don't let me down.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 06:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Was Phil Spector as innovative and important as Rolling Stone says he is?



Oh hells yeah. Most record producers are parasites on the careers of bands and artists, but Phil Spector was actually the creator of everything on the records he produced, regardless of whose name was on the credits. He was also an extreme sex perv freak, gun nut and paranoid coke fiend. he was about as high-roller as dudes like that can be, and it all drove him nuts. Unique character.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 06:52 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I forgot the most important question...White Sox or Cubs?



If you're a Cubs fan, I want you in the Tuesday game, and please bring your whole roll.

If you're a Sox fan, well, we're suffering some variance right now...




electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 07:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Somebody ask me about Swingo.

KJS
(Pooh-Bah)
07/05/07 07:08 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I have a theory that there is a very short lifespan for excellent rock bands. I just think in rock and roll that being young and hungry gives you a huge edge when it comes to producing kick ass music. When people lose that youth and hunger, the music suffers.

Can you think of bands that have released excellent albums more that 10 years apart? 5 years apart? If we had to destroy all rock music produced more than 10 years after a bands initial effort, what great music would be lost?

KJS


KJS
(Pooh-Bah)
07/05/07 07:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you heard the Chicago band Black Nag (includes Dorian Taj from Articles of Faith)? What do you think of them?

KJS


oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/05/07 07:12 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Somebody ask me about Swingo.




wtf is swingo?


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/05/07 07:12 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

I forgot the most important question...White Sox or Cubs?



If you're a Cubs fan, I want you in the Tuesday game, and please bring your whole roll.

If you're a Sox fan, well, we're suffering some variance right now...







Very nice.

I wouldn't call it "variance." Signing Erstad was a disaster, Dye's dropoff wasn't unexpected though the severity is surprising, and the bullpen was meh from the start.

I'm hoping Kenny learns from this year and we come back strong in 2008. He did do a good job with the McCarthy trade, and even Gavin Floyd looks like he might be a servicable major league pitcher for a couple years.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 07:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Can you think of bands that have released excellent albums more that 10 years apart? 5 years apart?



Well, present company excepted, there was an awesome Cheap Trick album released in 1994, titled "Cheap Trick," just like their first one, but the record company went [censored]-up a week later. The Fall keep making records, and once in a while one of them is good. Wire did it. Mission of Burma. Silkworm. Zeni Geva. Neurosis.

I was about to say it isn't too common, but I keep thinking of more, so basically you're wrong. Lame bands ought to break up early, but good ones can go on for a long time.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 07:34 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Have you heard the Chicago band Black Nag (includes Dorian Taj from Articles of Faith)? What do you think of them?

KJS



I have not heard them. I would not hold AOF (who were ridiculous and terrible) against Dorian. He always seemed like an okay guy.


NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/05/07 07:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you ever edited your own wikipedia entry?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 07:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

wtf is swingo?



Named after a Naked Raygun song, Swingo is the poker game for the 21st Century, incorporating elements of 5-card draw, stud, hold-em and intentional angle-shooting. Invented (though rarely played) at the Tuesday game.

Swingo
Pot-limit played with two equal blinds.

Everyone is dealt five cards, and there is a round of betting. After the betting closes, each player places two of his cards face-down on the table. When all players have placed their hole-cards down, all players still in the hand expose the other three cards in their hand by placing them on the table face-up. These cards ("the Board") remain in play unless the hand holding them folds. There is another round of betting, starting with the best hand showing (as in stud), not taking other players' cards into account. For example, a player with two Kings on board would act first if no other player has a better hand showing, even if another player could make trips using a board card in addition to his up-cards. After the betting is closed, a final community card is dealt face-up on the table. There is a final round of betting. Players, starting with the last player to bet or raise, show their hands and declare them. The best legal declared hand wins. Declaring a hand your cards do not allow does not kill your hand, but it makes you a dick, and you have to get it right or ask for help for your next try.

A player may use any one of the other players' exposed cards (the Board, not another player's hole cards) in his hand. More than one player may use the same Board card. Any player may use the river card in his hand. Players are not required to use any board cards or the river card to make their hands. A player must use a minimum of three cards from his original five-card hand. The best five-card hand wins.

There is some debate about whether this game should be declared or cards-speak.

Other options: Hi-Low split, split pot with a player whose board card you use to make your hand (for this version, the hands should be declared rather than cards speak, since a player may opt to play for the whole pot by declaring a hand that doesn't use an opponent's up card).

[edit: I do not know of any site that offers Swingo online]


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 07:53 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Have you ever edited your own wikipedia entry?



I think editing your own Wikipedia entry is super-duper lame and uncool, and I would never do it. It's supposed to be for other people to hang stuff on you, like how you are a sex criminal or cheat at Yahtzee whatever.


charlatantric
(stranger)
07/05/07 08:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve,

Curious about your production on a couple Mono albums and GY!BE...

At the beginning of some songs (Ode, Yearning, and 09-15-00), the listener can hear your voice saying, "You're on." I understand these were recorded live, but I was curious what the purpose of leaving the command on those songs served.


jht
(stranger)
07/05/07 08:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Mr Albini

I'm particularly fond of the Electrelane albums you worked on, I was wondering how you found working with them and what you think of the albums yourself.

Also, I was wondering what record producers you particularly admire yourself.


turnipmonster
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/05/07 08:42 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

what's your relationship with the guitar and how has it changed over the years? do you spend a lot of time playing for fun, or not so much?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 08:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hey Steve,

Curious about your production on a couple Mono albums and GY!BE...

At the beginning of some songs (Ode, Yearning, and 09-15-00), the listener can hear your voice saying, "You're on." I understand these were recorded live, but I was curious what the purpose of leaving the command on those songs served.



I didn't mix the Godspeed! record, so I don't know what decisions were made there. With Mono, I think they started thinking of that as the beginning of the song. In one case, I remember they asked me to overdub a "you're rolling." I never pressed them for a specific reason and they never gave me one.


NT!
(****)
07/05/07 08:53 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

steve,

you may very well be saying 'no comment' by ignoring it in my last post, but i am super curious: nothing to say about 24 hour revenge therapy?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 08:58 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Mr Albini

I'm particularly fond of the Electrelane albums you worked on, I was wondering how you found working with them and what you think of the albums yourself.



I think Electrelane are an awesome band, with really ambitious ideas. Each of the women is a unique character and I enjoyed working with them tremendously. Verity is a fantastic musician with the capacity to hear impossibly complex arrangements in her head, and I admire that.

Quote:

Also, I was wondering what record producers you particularly admire yourself.



I don't think too much of producers, honestly. There are some great sounding albums out there (Highway to Hell, Back in Black, Zuma, Led Zeppelin albums, Spiderland) but I attribute that to the bands themselves. If you listen to the crap Mutt Lange has done since Back in Black, for example, you can tell that giving the producer any credit for that album is going too far.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 09:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

steve,

you may very well be saying 'no comment' by ignoring it in my last post, but i am super curious: nothing to say about 24 hour revenge therapy?



Sorry. I had to resort to Google to discover that it was a Jawbreaker album. I don't remember too much about it, other than that it was a decent, if standard pop punk record of the type that was pretty common in the mid-90s.

I didn't follow that scene or that band, and I don't know if I ever heard the record after I finished work on it, so I really don't have anything to add. Glad you liked it.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 09:05 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

what's your relationship with the guitar and how has it changed over the years? do you spend a lot of time playing for fun, or not so much?



Hardly ever. Once a month or so I'll get to play a little. More if the band is rehearsing for a tour or writing songs. Still hardly any.


ua1176
(enthusiast)
07/05/07 09:34 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

whats up? im a young professional audio engineer, musician, etc etc etc trying to make a living in the NYC scene. your attitude is refreshing amidst all the [censored] out there. so i first want to thank you for sticking it out in the biz, and for keeping Electrical's doors open.

my question to you is- with digital audio getting better as time goes on, is there gonna be a Pro Tools rig at Electrical? do you ever do sessions at other studios where you end up using Pro Tools?

since you're working primarily with 2''....have you ever run into a session that needed an absurd amount of editing? i've not worked much with tape in my time as an AE....is there ever a point at which it becomes counterproductive to do a large amount of editing on analog tape?

thanks,

jonathan jetter


nvts
(stranger)
07/05/07 09:52 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

Thanks very much for the Q&A opportunity. A few questions on a couple of topics:

1) It is generally accepted that most folks prefer the smell of their own farts to that of others'. Is this true for you, and can you tell us a little bit about the features of your farts that make them more palatable? Do you take any measures to achieve and maintain any particular fart qualities?

2) David Wm. Sims' instrument sound, while quite extraordinary, strongly suggests that he has a fascination with farts well beyond the social norm. Did he talk about them often? Did he choose his meals with future farts in mind? I understand if you're not at liberty to discuss, but - is this why the Jesus Lizard split?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 10:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

with digital audio getting better as time goes on, is there gonna be a Pro Tools rig at Electrical? do you ever do sessions at other studios where you end up using Pro Tools?



We have digital sessions at Electrical pretty regularly. If a session comes in that requires a Pro Tools rig, we strap one in, and we wouldn't be being reasonable if we refused.

Personally, I have never used Pro Tools, and never worked from a computer for any part of a recording session. I have never felt limited by this arrangement, and there has never been a moment in a session where I have had to say "we can't do that" because we were working on tape.

Quote:

since you're working primarily with 2''....have you ever run into a session that needed an absurd amount of editing?



Yes. We have another appearance of Urge Overkill in this thread.

Quote:

i've not worked much with tape in my time as an AE....is there ever a point at which it becomes counterproductive to do a large amount of editing on analog tape?



Well, you sort-of answered your own question there. A lot of editing means that there's something terribly wrong with the recording, and you're going through heroic steps to salvage it. I try never to let things get that far out of whack.

It is counter-productive to try to turn ka-kaa into gold.

Since editing is relatively quicker in the digital domain, a lot of digital-only engineers use editing as their default tool in every situation. I think that's profoundly lazy, and the equivalent of trying to build a house with just a hammer, pretending that everything is a nail. It is one of the earmarks of a hack. You could say "fish" instead.


TheTheory
(stranger)
07/05/07 10:17 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Ballydowse



I had no idea you worked with Ballydowse on anything. Wow. This band was excellent.

I registered just to post this. Now I'm going to continue read this superb thread...


tacoshooter
(newbie)
07/05/07 10:21 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Yes. We have another appearance of Urge Overkill in this thread.




Heh.

I saw UO live twice back in the nineties and both times I was completely shocked at how putrid they were. I mean, I'm no great shakes as a guitar player, but both times they were so out of whack that I was almost embarrassed for them. The first time was in the back of a bar in Iowa City so I thought maybe they just didnt give a damn, but then they sucked it up again for me at the Metro.

Guess it wasn't just a bad couple of nights, eh?


ramblez
(stranger)
07/05/07 10:56 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve, I was invited to tag along to one of your poker nights a couple of months ago by a friend of mine (local musician), but I totally chickened out. I only play (very) casually and would be totally out of my league. My friend is extremely easy going, and thought it would be okay.

Should I accept the invitation next time?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/05/07 11:07 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hi Steve, I was invited to tag along to one of your poker nights a couple of months ago by a friend of mine (local musician), but I totally chickened out. I only play (very) casually and would be totally out of my league. My friend is extremely easy going, and thought it would be okay.

Should I accept the invitation next time?



Oh absolutely.


roto13
(stranger)
07/05/07 11:27 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I enjoy the music of the Didjits, and I understand you did some recording for them. Which records did you work on, and were they a band whose music (or company) you enjoyed?

Von Hayes
(stranger)
07/05/07 11:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you heard Andy Falkous' new band Future of the Left?

who in your opinion did you need to work with the least? like, bands that you pretty much just plugged in and were done right quick.


hoponcox
(stranger)
07/05/07 11:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

So I first off have to say that I couldn't stop laughing when you guys were opening for the stooges at the congress recently. I dont know when you guys decided to start [censored] with the audience, but they deserved it and kudos to you for finishing the set.

I too am a vinyl junkie, but things being as they are I was interested in finding out if you will ever mix a release differently for Mp3 given the [censored] [censored] nature of the ipod D to A converter.

BTW you should give the scoutmaster a listen, its a pretty amazing piece of equipment.


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/05/07 11:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

LOL at all the lurkers coming out.

NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/06/07 12:02 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Being into the Chicago music scene, I'm sure you have an opinion of Billy Corgan and the Pumpkins. What are your thoughts about the reunion, Billy's solo album (lol), or anything else about them? How have they impacted the music scene in Chicago?

cmyr
(old hand)
07/06/07 12:33 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

those aren't lurkers, someone leaked the thread on metafilter. And metafilter... that cmyr guy there, totally different dude. Don't even know that guy. Even a little bit.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 01:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I enjoy the music of the Didjits, and I understand you did some recording for them. Which records did you work on, and were they a band whose music (or company) you enjoyed?



The Didjits were a great band and good friends. My bands got to play with them several times and it was always a hoot. At one point, while I was still running Ruthless Records, I was going to put out the album that became Hey Judester, but luckily for everyone Corey Rusk from Touch and Go got to hear it and agreed to put it out. I worked on Full Nelson Riley, Little Miss Carriage and some other odds-and-ends. They got a well-deserved windfall when the punk band the Offspring covered "Kill Boy Powerhead" on an album that sold in the millions.

The Didjits reunited for the Touch and Go 25th anniversary, and it was like someone stopped the clock on them in the 80s and then started it again for the show. Immaculate.


ua1176
(enthusiast)
07/06/07 02:00 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve-

one more question if you don't mind. since you're dealing with semi-long term sessions that (as far as i can tell) have a definitive start date and end date....how do you deal with situations where things take longer than planned?

pull a bunch of all-nighters toward the end of the session?

postpone the next clients for a couple days?

postpone the current clients until there's free time available?

always curious about how other people handle this. thanks,

jon


vibizoom
(stranger)
07/06/07 02:18 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I'm a big fan of the Plush record you produced. What was it like working with Liam Hayes? I once heard that all the mistakes were deliberate. Is this true?

Also, if you were a musician of modest means, who had an appreciation for analog recording, what type of multitracker would you use for home recording?

Thanks,
Bob


nath
(the second coming of the second coming)
07/06/07 02:25 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

those aren't lurkers, someone leaked the thread on metafilter. And metafilter... that cmyr guy there, totally different dude. Don't even know that guy. Even a little bit.



oh man, i haven't been there in like 4 years, but i used to read MeFi all the time

sorry for the "old internet coot" hijack


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 02:30 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

since you're dealing with semi-long term sessions that (as far as i can tell) have a definitive start date and end date....how do you deal with situations where things take longer than planned?



I don't let them get that far out of hand. If need be, I'll work a long night, but if I sense that there won't be enough time to finish at the current pace, then I get the band to comprehend and either lighten the work load, schedule more time (usually requires a bit of lead time) or get the band to work quicker. Except in a few rare cases (acts of god, injury, illness, personal tragedy etc.), I wouldn't impose on an upcoming session. I can't justify letting a band's simple lack of preparedness interfere with another session.

In an absolute sense, the budget decides everything. If there's money enough, then nothing is really a problem. If there isn't, then the band gets to make the kind of record their budget allows, and at the pace the budget dictates. If they can't deal with that, then they have bigger problems than finishing their record.

But one way or another, I'm not going to send the band back to Belgium without their record.


galmost
(member)
07/06/07 02:34 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

This thread [censored] delivers!

What stakes do you play?

Are your screennames public?

How rigged is pokerstars?

You recorded "Icarus" by "The Forms", What do you think of them? Are there any bands you would recommend to a fan of The Forms?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 02:57 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What stakes do you play?

Are your screennames public?

How rigged is pokerstars?



I have played stud online as high as 25-50, but the games are not as good lately, so I stick to 8-16 and smaller. In NLHE, HORSE or PLO8, I try not to have more than a grand or so in play, so I'll play live stakes appropriate for that sort of buy-in (1-2 NL, 3-5 NL, 5-5 NL, up to 8-16 limit), or online I'll 2-table $200 NLHE or a medium stakes stud game and a $200 NLHE game. I haven't been in casinos where they spread stud enough to have a feel for how those games play, but I'd probably take a shot at live stud up to $40-80.

My FT screen name is pretty tricky, "steve albini." Hunt me down.

Stars is probably not too rigged. Live poker is way more rigged.

Quote:

You recorded "Icarus" by "The Forms", What do you think of them? Are there any bands you would recommend to a fan of The Forms?




If you like the Forms, you will probably like their alter-ego, the Desert Fathers.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 03:04 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I'm a big fan of the Plush record you produced. What was it like working with Liam Hayes? I once heard that all the mistakes were deliberate. Is this true?



That record was made pretty meticulously. Anything on the record was chosen specifically and put there intentionally.

Liam has the spark of genius, but he's a little in the clouds, and he has a lot of philosophical baggage about how he makes his way in the world. It makes it difficult to count on him in any formal way, but every once in a while he does something incredible.

Quote:

Also, if you were a musician of modest means, who had an appreciation for analog recording, what type of multitracker would you use for home recording?



If you want to build a studio, you can buy an excellent multitrack tape machine for a grand or so, but they are inappropriate for just putzing around. They're a commitment of time and money.

I'd just get a simple 4-track and see how you like it. If you do, then you can move up to more sophisticated gear.


porcelain
(stranger)
07/06/07 03:57 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

Few things, here -

1. Jessica Hopper/ Stephen Merritt/Song of the South/ "Rockism"....any thoughts?

2. Once when I saw Shellac, there was a technical issue with one of the amps. You took the opportunity to quote (if I remember correctly) a stand-up comedy adage. Something about preparedness and timing? I thought it was funny, and for years I've wished I could remember it. Have any clue what I'm talking about?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 04:05 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1. Jessica Hopper/ Stephen Merritt/Song of the South/ "Rockism"....any thoughts?



Sure.

Quote:

2. Once when I saw Shellac, there was a technical issue with one of the amps. You took the opportunity to quote (if I remember correctly) a stand-up comedy adage. Something about preparedness and timing? I thought it was funny, and for years I've wished I could remember it. Have any clue what I'm talking about?



Nope.


cameronw01
(Sweats better than he plays)
07/06/07 05:30 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

you seem to really despise Urge Overkill. I've heard that they're difficult to work with etc. Any stories you'd like to share?

Thanks again,

Cameron


arbuthnot
(journeyman)
07/06/07 10:20 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Jeez, all these people with one post asking questions. Don't they know that they can go to the Electrical Audio Forums and ask these questions? They must not. Back to the poker questions!

Thanks for answering my previous questions. I'm pleased to hear that you think Russ is the best LHE player in your regular game, but am surprised that you didn't mention him in the NLHE category especially considering his outstanding NLHE tournament record.

Three more quick questions, if you'd be so kind:

1. Have you ever smooth-called on the river with the nuts when heads-up?

2. Have you ever shot an angle? Even a little one?

3. What are your favorite poker phrases?

Grazie


markoelreno
(stranger)
07/06/07 10:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

A couple of questions for you:

1. The new Shellac record is great! I've always wondered, though, how do you keep your objectivity when it comes to your own performances (and bandmates, whom you are close with)? Is it more difficult to do? Or are you capable, or used to, being able to judge properly whether you are happy or not happy with a performance, recording work, mix, with Shellac of North America?

2. I love your work with Low. My band recently recorded with Alan Sparhawk and Eric Swanson in Duluth (at their church/studio) and it was a great experience. One thing that always struck me on those records you did with Low was the string quartet (or more?) sounds -- just beautiful. How in particular did you get those sounds and was it any different then just miking up, sans amp, an acoustic guitar or something like that?


Guesstimater
(stranger)
07/06/07 11:59 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve. I'm a big fan. I hope this is really you.

Where did the name Rape Man come from? Was it named after someone specific?

I hear you like baseball. Do you play? Have you ever thought about owning a team? If so, I would like to be the manager, ha ha.

What is your philosophy for playing NLHE against bad, unpredictable players?

Who is the best Swingo player you know? Does he make a lot of money playing it?

Sorry for all the questions. I think I am just nervous or something.


SpleenLSD
(member)
07/06/07 12:56 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

This is a fun diversion from discussing the softness of Florida O8 tables...and oh they are newly-minted-baby-bottom soft...

I saw Rapeman at CBGBs way back in 199X. Jeez is Rey an amazing drummer; he and George Hurley freak me out. At any rate, I saw that you used Dunlop copper picks. I love the things for their durability and the bright kind of sound they help deliver. However, on yours I noticed there was a little snip taken from the tip of the pick so that there were in effect two little points at the tip. Was that something deliberate? If so, why and how did you do it?

And for those who asked getting in to the recording biz, or for folks who are just curious about amateur recording, there's about a bajillion options for noodling around as an amateur. Any Sam Ash will be happy to overcharge you for a casette (or digital) 4 track. Any Mac will have "Garage Band" for free, though the time I've spent with it has been frustration. The Tascam 428 is a nice, cheap option that will allow multitracking. Where you'll realy end up spening $$$ is on mics. Steve, feel free to debunk this free advice...


pdxmike
(stranger)
07/06/07 12:57 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

stereogum.com and metafilter.com have posted links to this thread...interesting

Max Raker
(old hand)
07/06/07 01:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What are some good swingo angle shoots?

toomuchnoise
(stranger)
07/06/07 01:48 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

1. Janet Weiss yes or no? and why.
2. Any stories you can share on your working with Polly Jean Harvey? When Rid of Me came out, she went on record as saying she was pleased with the work you had done. Would you like to work with PJ again?


humandoubles
(stranger)
07/06/07 02:16 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

i read in an interview w/ grant (rudimentary peni) that he and jon laid down some tracks and sent it to you. what has/will ever become of these?
thanx...


willie
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/06/07 03:25 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

awesome thread mr albini.

thanks for the insight.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 04:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I'm pleased to hear that you think Russ is the best LHE player in your regular game, but am surprised that you didn't mention him in the NLHE category especially considering his outstanding NLHE tournament record.



LOL Homegameaments

Quote:

1. Have you ever smooth-called on the river with the nuts when heads-up?



Not heads-up. I misread my hand once and smooth called a three-way pot with a straight flush. I thought I had backdoored a one-card flush the 8 when I had actually made a straight flush.

Quote:

2. Have you ever shot an angle? Even a little one?



Can't think of one. But this might be an angle right here. Wait, here's one. I was out of position against Devin with some mediocre hand like second pair, and another overcard comes on the river. I said "I check and call." Hoping to get him to reveal the strength of his hand. He obliged by betting about twice the pot, so I folded.

Quote:

3. What are your favorite poker phrases?



Well, I love hearing "I fold." Just love it. Like pretty music. I like the French term for pushing all-in, "Tapis," meaning "carpet," as though you were emptying your house out down to the carpets in order to bet everything.

There are some poker expressions that are unique to the Tuesday game that I quite like, and deserve to see wider use:

"Shitapes" unskilled players of the type found in low-limit online games and at the casino boats near Chicago. Inspired by a chat-box insult, but appropriate because they jabber and throw their chips in the pot the way monkeys fling their poo.

"Bot" an opening raise to 5x the BB, after a player in the game who would pretend to be a robot calculating the perfect bet. Also, a min-raise following a Bot is a re-Bot.

"Crapass" complaining about the way the cards fell. After another player who would occasionally violently muck his "crapass cards!" Also, complaining about anything is now "crapassing."

"Wizard mode" when a player is passively calling bets on the river, being a pay-off wizard, he is said to be stuck in "Wizard mode." It is also a subtle jab at role-playing gamers, the only class with a higher dork quotient than poker players.


KJS
(Pooh-Bah)
07/06/07 04:52 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Have you heard the Chicago band Black Nag (includes Dorian Taj from Articles of Faith)? What do you think of them?

KJS




I have not heard them. I would not hold AOF (who were ridiculous and terrible) against Dorian. He always seemed like an okay guy.




Just curious. My sister is their drummer/vocalist.

KJS


offyerhead
(stranger)
07/06/07 05:28 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

this link was just posted on stereogum so apres moi, le indie pop deluge...

my question relates to The Wedding Present.

Seamonsters is widely considered their best effort. I think even Gedge would agree with that but they didn't stick with that sound on future albums. Did you have to convince them of the type of sound you were giving them on Seamonsters? Were they resistant or did you see eye to eye on the recordings? He's been known to have disagreements with sound engineers and producers.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 05:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

how do you keep your objectivity when it comes to your own performances (and bandmates, whom you are close with)?



Making a record isn't an objective exercise like counting peaches in a basket. Objectivity has no place in the creative part of the recording process. In the technical side, yes. The equipment and the technique need to be appropriate for the job, and most of the time that means operating everything within its technically-correct specifications, and with two engineers in the band, that part is pretty easy.

I am convinced that any decent art (including records) is made with a measure of disregard for its audience. Good art is an almost entirely selfish pursuit, in that the artist is doing something unique to him, and any outside perspective (this "objective" one) would be ignorant and unable to judge it completely. Having seen many bands go through the process, I am convinced that making concessions to the imaginary audience (or any "objective" considerations) almost always weakens the record.

Good records are made by freakishly-obsessed people, driven to do what only they can do, and their thinking and processes are often "objectively" wrong. Objective measures are at best a benchmark of mediocrity and shouldn't be in consideration.

Quote:

How in particular did you get those (string) sounds and was it any different then just miking up, sans amp, an acoustic guitar or something like that?



Much of the string recording for the Low records was done in Minneapolis by Tom Herbers, and I shouldn't get credit for it. Some of it I did, and yes, I just put a microphone where it sounded good and pressed "record." Room acoustics are critical for string ensemble recording, and I'm lucky that I get to work in good-sounding rooms.


J Christensen
(stranger)
07/06/07 05:48 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What, in your mind, makes Goat a better record than Liar? Just better songs? Production? I've always thought Liar was far and away the better record so I was just curious what your take on it is.

ReallyBadReverb
(stranger)
07/06/07 06:34 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

If you are considering going into a recording program, I would strongly recommend going to a normal accredited university with a concentration in engineering, acoustics or music. Some schools offer a Tonmeister-equivalent recording program (UMass Lowell and University of Iowa used to, I don't know who does now).




I went to UMass Lowell as a music education major and they still offer a sound recording degree in the music department (most of my friends were in this major...and as a result, many people thought I was too). It is actually a music performance degree with an emphasis with in sound recording technology. You can also pursue SRT as a minor paired with electrical engineering or computer science. It is probably one of the few schools still actively teaching the art of analog recording. There are several projects which require students to cut and edit tape. Their senior studio is equipped with a 2" machine and all sorts of other neat equipment. They do also have digital equipment seeing as they are preparing people for a career that may include this technology.

UML also has a radio station, WUML, that despite taking a beating from the school's administration is still a great way to meet new people, hear cool music and practice your craft. Bob Weston's Live from the Fallout Shelter is still on the air on Monday nights.

Many of my friends have gone on to careers in the audio industry including post-production work (which earned one of them an Emmy), mastering and General Assistant at Avatar Studios in NYC.

I agree with Steve. Go for the university education. I have a few friends that went to NE Institute of the Arts (a 2 year trade style school) that I am positive did not get anywhere near the same experience as my friends at UML.

I am a poker idiot and therefore cannot ask any questions appropriate for this forum. Maybe when I get some courage later I'll post some sort of musical or recording related question. Or maybe I'll just ask what your favorite brand of peanut butter is...


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 06:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hi Steve. I'm a big fan. I hope this is really you.

Where did the name Rape Man come from? Was it named after someone specific?

I hear you like baseball. Do you play? Have you ever thought about owning a team? If so, I would like to be the manager, ha ha.

What is your philosophy for playing NLHE against bad, unpredictable players?

Who is the best Swingo player you know? Does he make a lot of money playing it?

Sorry for all the questions. I think I am just nervous or something.




G Street
(member)
07/06/07 06:54 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Thanks for the info on the bands I'll get started on that list soon as I get paid next week.

1)how do you feel about Kronos Quartet? if you like them can you suggest anything in that neighborhood?

2) Just a comment, I liked some songs on Exit the Dragon by Urge Overkill a lot, do they suck that bad? I believe you though, That lead singer guy was pulling some rock star B.S. when I saw him at a small (really tiny) Club a few years back when he was touring that solo album of his.

3) You may direct me to your forum, but are there any specific techniques you'd suggest for recording vocals at home alone on run of the mill digital equip (Audio Technica at2020 into a presonus tube pre into a yamaha aw-1600, before you say anything I got it all on the cheap) ? I'm specifically having trouble getting good levels when it's mixed w/ a few other inst.

4)If my stuff sucks badly is their any cheap(inexpensive) stuff you can suggest?

Sorry to be so selfish y'all but I had to jump at the chance.

Thanks for the gear tips too, I was looking for a rugged and inexpensive tube head and I don't wanna lug this vt-22 around.


subverter
(stranger)
07/06/07 07:21 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve, just curious as to other music you're into, like electronic stuff....do you ever listen to any of this? Techno/abstract/whatever....doesn't have to be recent, go as far back as you like.

terryb
(stranger)
07/06/07 07:28 PM
electrical audio

Steve, have you ever used old speakers as mics on kickdrums or bass cabs?

What mics do you like for drum overheads?

Ever heard any recording efforts by Alex Newport?

Do you read TapeOp?

Do you have any interest in football?


mckinley
(stranger)
07/06/07 07:42 PM
Re: electrical audio

I have two questions. The First is about the albums you have recorded for the band the EX. These records have such a great vibe to them and capture them so well. Is there anything you can say about how the are in the studio?

And second, I once read that originally Fugazi recorded "In on the Kill Taker" with you, then both parties agreed they should do it again. Is there anything you can tell us about that?

Thanks!


Joe Fitzgerald
(stranger)
07/06/07 07:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Mr. Albini,
Thank you for your insights in this post, it is enlightening to hear the opinions of a more experienced engineer.

Anyway, a couple of questions, first two regarding "in Utero", I listened to the album a few weeks ago and picked up on a couple things.

I noticed in "rape me" the first verse that the drums play on, it seems that the snare was overdubbed, but the old snare line remained in what I am assuming are the overheads.
Was this an intentional thing? an afterthought? or something you just lived with? It seems intentional, because it sounds pretty cool.
Did dave grohl overdub hits a lot?
I use drum replacement software sometimes, but don't like to, it kills the dynamics of a song. better to just have a good drummer.

Whatever you did to get the KICK drum sound for that album, in my opinion, set the tone for the whole record. It almost has a "woody" sound (haha everyone laugh.... ok done.)
that, got me thinking of an clip I saw of the lord of the rings in post prod, where they built a wooden box with baffles, and reamped the dialogue, to get the tree dudes sound.
Was is something like that you did? if not, have you ever?

Final question,
I'm a Full Sail Grad, Certified Pro Tools operator, and currently freelance engineering... Do you have any advice for someone in my "newborn" position?
At the moment, I am just trying to do as much work as possible, meet as many people / bands as I can, and generally do good by everyone I come in contact with.


Thank you again for your posts, I've gained some insight and a few laughs. =)
Take it light.
-Joe Fitzgerald


ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/06/07 08:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

LOL at all the people who signed up at a poker forum to ask Steve questions when he has his own forum at his website.

roto13
(stranger)
07/06/07 08:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do you ever watch documentaries about the making of famous rock records, or is that too much like work to be entertaining? I'm thinking specifically of the Metallica documentary where their label hires a therapist to help the band and producer work through their bad vibes and childhood "issues" so that they might be able to squeeze out a serviceable rock album. I know nothing about Metallica, but that is one funny movie.

AlexisBelle
(Banned)
07/06/07 09:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve

Brightback Morning Light is the best sounding (production, quality) album in my opinion of the year so far. Have you had the chance to listen? Also, we need a new Dead Meadow album soon, those guys are making great records. Also, allow me to blow smoke up your ass and mention that the work done on Joanna Newsom's Y's sounds great.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 10:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Have you heard Andy Falkous' new band Future of the Left?



Andy is quality. I'm glad he's still playing.

Quote:

who in your opinion did you need to work with the least? like, bands that you pretty much just plugged in and were done right quick.



Well, The band Weeddeater just did an album here that was scheduled to take 5 days, but they knocked it out in 4, and I think we were done by 8pm every day. That's a pretty easy session. If you've ever seen them, you know that they have a unique and gnarly sound, but that sound is built-in, and I didn't have to do anything special. That one just sort-of fell off the truck complete.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 10:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1)how do you feel about Kronos Quartet? if you like them can you suggest anything in that neighborhood?



If you mean small-ensemble string music, you might like Threnody Ensemble or the Rachel's. I particularly like their Music for Egon Schiele, but that's more piano-based. If you are more interested in ensembles with commissioned pieces, you might like some of Rova Saxophone quartet's recordings.

Quote:

I liked some songs on Exit the Dragon by Urge Overkill a lot, do they suck that bad?



Yeah, they do. You probably don't even like those songs you think you like.


Quote:

3) You may direct me to your forum...



All this stuff should be directed to an audio/recording forum. Unless you want to talk about nailing musicians, Swingo or how bad Urge Overkill are, that's probably the place.


NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/06/07 10:38 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Waht m;usican gave the best bj. pics plzzz

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 10:53 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hi Steve, just curious as to other music you're into, like electronic stuff....do you ever listen to any of this? Techno/abstract/whatever....doesn't have to be recent, go as far back as you like.



There used to be interesting electronic music, before that became a synonym for a special kind of horrible dance music. I enjoyed quite a bit of this pre-disco era: Iannis Xenakis, Morton Subotnick, the White Noise, Silver Apples, Kraftwerk, Suicide, DAF, Tommi Stumpff, S.P.K., Throbbing Gristle, Whitehouse, Metal Urbain, Cabaret Voltaire, Tuxedo Moon, Factrix, etc. There is very little going on now that can compare to the either the creepy dread or the crazy inventiveness of the pre-sampler era.

I do admire bands like Wolf Eyes, and I had a single from Arcane Device that I liked, but honestly, dance music really destroyed the whole electronic genre for me, and I no longer even look for it.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/06/07 10:59 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

LOL at all the people who signed up at a poker forum to ask Steve questions when he has his own forum at his website.



Yeah, this thread has gone lame in a hurry.


Joe Fitzgerald
(stranger)
07/06/07 11:22 PM
Yeah, this thread has gone lame in a hurry.

I don't frequent forums much beside the digidesign user conference. I merely saw this as an opportunity to ask some questions I was curious about only weeks ago. Please excuse my hijacking of your thread.

Cake
(stranger)
07/06/07 11:23 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Someone else in this thread asked you about the recordings with Rudimentary Peni that took place in the late 1980's. I had interviewed Grant from Peni back in the mid-to-late 90's for good 'ol fLiPSiDE and he mentioned that he remembered recording those tracks and how amazing they sounded. I know that Nick Blinko didn't take part in the sessions, but Grant and Jon are such an amazing rhythm section that I'm sure it was a blast for you to play with them.

Also, good 'ol Manny from Distortion Felix always praised your recording of them. He's one of the coolest cats in Silverlake and as down to earth as my local mechanic. I love that guy!

I don't know if you've heard 400 Blows, but they are a pretty amazing live band. They are also pretty out there like if you took Jaz Coleman from Killing Joke and had him front an early Black Flag that was influenced by the Melvins. Yeah, I know..maybe they have a time machine?

Anyways, enough of my verbage...Keep doing what you love!

Peace,

Cake


Justin koavf
(stranger)
07/07/07 12:05 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

How did you get hooked up with Hum from Champaign/Urbana? What was it like working with them? Really no anecdote is too small, so go into as much detail as you please.

Thanks.

-JAK
----
http://wsahara.net/


OrangeCat
(enthusiast)
07/07/07 12:24 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Any truth to the rumor that you are mixerman?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 12:33 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What are some good swingo angle shoots?



I don't want to give the impression that I like angle shooting. Swingo is a ridiculous game, and in an attempt to incorporate elements of many other poker games, an element of angle-shooting was added for completeness.

A big part of the game is which cards you choose to expose when you separate your hole cards from your board cards. This was intended to mimic the angle-shoot of flashing a card to mislead a player. Mike Caro outlines one such play in his Book of Tells, and I recently had a French dude try something similar at the Aviation Club. French dude moved a big bet into the pot with the same hand that held his hole cards, intentionally flashing me a red Trey when the board had a four-flush in Clubs showing, trying to sell either a bluff or value bet of the bottom straight. I had to fold the top straight, because his other card was almost certainly the A.

In Swingo, everyone's boards are also in play for everyone else's hand, so you can make a deceptive play that forces player A to fold the card that would allow player B to beat you. Here's an example:

On the deal, you have a set of eights, a great starting hand. Once the boards and river card are out, you have bricked your full house draw, and only have trips.

Player A (who has never played Swingo before) has a probable four-flush in his hand, which he will complete with a spade from your board, and Player B is showing a pair of Deuces, which means a probable two-pair hand (knowing this takes some 'splaining, so just trust me), which he will fill with the 2 from player A's board if A stays in the hand.

Player B wants to extract value from both you and player A, but he cannot beat you if player A folds. He bets, you say "We both filled! Let's dance!" and re-pot it. Player A folds his flush, and in so doing, folds player B's boat. Player B knows you are not full, since none of your cards are paired in sight (a necessity for a full house in Swingo), so he makes a crying call. The angle is that taking advantage of player A's inexperience lost the pot for player B.

More than any other game I can think of, Swingo requires players to manage the betting behavior of their opponents, keeping key players in a pot while eliminating others. This is an area of the game ripe for angle shooting.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 12:39 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Any truth to the rumor that you are mixerman?



No, he gets paid a lot more than me.


0 Talbot 0
(stranger)
07/07/07 12:58 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I think that the past 10 years give or take have seen really [censored] music. Mostly just brainwashed junk where nobody seems to stand out.

It seems like theres a couple leaders of each different sound of music, but EVERYBODY sounds the exact same. Such as, John Mayer, Creed, My Chemical Romance for a few, almost every band out there sounds like one of them or one of the other few bands today.

I haven't heard a band come out with any music that resembled any blues, jazz, folk, etc. But they're all genres that have come out recently such as Emo, Screamo, Protopunk/ Poppunk, Heavy Metal, rap, etc. Even country is now turnning into pop. The word music might as well be changed to Pop. So people can say, what pop genre do you like?

I know there are people that still make good music, but they're a dieing breed today.

Tell me what you think of this argument since you are one that has been in the buisiness for the past while.


village
(stranger)
07/07/07 01:18 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Glen, here. Huge fan. Long-term record store employee. Old friend of Danielle who used to run Southern. "Racer-X" was one of the records that changed how I hear music. No, really.
Top Albini questions of the moment:
1) How old were you the first time you heard Kraftwerk?
2) Are you a fan of Gang of Four "Entertainment!"?
3) After recording "Light Sabre [censored]-Sucking Blues", what happened in the studio? (I worship that song)
4) When is "awesome" going to be over?
5) Could you tell, during the "Surfer Rosa" sessions that you were recording EXTREMELY influential music?
6) Can you hear me now?


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/07/07 02:50 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

OMG, if I see one more person who makes this their first (and probably last) post I'm going to shoot myself.

To make this thread more fun and less music nerdy:

1) Beatles or Stones?

2) Brian Townsend or Patrik Antonius?

3) What was the last show you saw at the Fireside?

4) Sklansky - genius or creep?

5) Do you have plans on wearing your LOL Donkaments shirt on stage during a show?


village
(stranger)
07/07/07 03:13 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Dear Mikey Patriot,
I am truly shattered that I did not live up to your level of coolness. I probably won't sleep for a week (maybe a month).
Please answer the following questions...
1) How
2) How long
3) How long has
4) How long has it
5) How long has it been
6) How long has it been since
7) How long has it been since you've
8) How long has it been since you've gotten
9) How long has it been since you've gotten laid?
10) I'll totally blow you.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 03:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

OMG, if I see one more person who makes this their first (and probably last) post I'm going to shoot myself.



Man, I didn't mean to drag all this crap in here. Sorry. I thought it was just us.

Quote:

To make this thread more fun and less music nerdy:

1) Beatles or Stones?



Stooges.

Quote:

2) Brian Townsend or Patrik Antonius?



Antonius attracts more poon, sbrugby gets to flip for half a million with an overlay... thinking... thinking... poon wins.

Quote:

3) What was the last show you saw at the Fireside?



I'm going to say it was the Detholz! but it's been a couple of years.

Quote:

4) Sklansky - genius or creep?



Or? Or? Or? Where do you get this false dichotomy? He's a profoundly creepy genius. That seems plain-as-day obvious.

Quote:

5) Do you have plans on wearing your LOL Donkaments shirt on stage during a show?



What's it worth to you?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 03:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I think that the past 10 years give or take have seen really [censored] music. Mostly just brainwashed junk where nobody seems to stand out.



Nothing ever stands out. You have to look for anything you might like. Clearly you have given up looking.

Quote:

Tell me what you think of this argument since you are one that has been in the buisiness for the past while.



I think you're a defeatist and you are destined not to enjoy music. If you wait for other people to thrust music under your nose, you'll be listening to nothing but crap for a long while, because that's what gets thrust at us. Music is not a spectator sport.


village
(stranger)
07/07/07 03:48 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

So, anyway...Glen, here. Huge fan. Long-term record store employee. Old friend of Danielle who used to run Southern. "Racer-X" was one of the records that changed how I hear music. No, really.
Top Albini questions of the moment:
1) How old were you the first time you heard Kraftwerk?
2) Are you a fan of Gang of Four "Entertainment!"?
3) After recording "Light Sabre [censored]-Sucking Blues", what happened in the studio? (I worship that song)
4) When is "awesome" going to be over?
5) Could you tell, during the "Surfer Rosa" sessions that you were recording EXTREMELY influential music?
6) Can you hear me now?


skunkworks
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/07/07 06:01 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Sweet electric Jesus, these one-post wonders are annoying.

Canadian
(stranger)
07/07/07 08:37 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve - thanks for doing this.

One of my top 5 albums ever is Rid of Me. I still remember getting a copy in at my college radio station, putting on Rid of Me the song and having my ears [censored] blown off when the chorus kicked in. The songwriting is incredible and how you recorded PJ's guitar and Rob Ellis' drums really complements the material. I know that she wrote a lot of material before these sessions and put out a demos album of material later on with a couple of songs that didn't make it onto Rid of Me itself. I prefer the album versions of songs to the demos and I've always wondered, besides Reeling, what other songs did you record during those sessions that didn't make it onto the album?


ill.eatyourEYES
(newbie)
07/07/07 08:48 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Obviously you seen alot of greats, but being a musician yourself did you ever wished of being a part of what they were making? Not in a technical sense more like a daydream way...and what band of course.

killsadie
(Pooh-Bah)
07/07/07 09:26 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

k$?

samsdmf
(Pooh-Bah)
07/07/07 10:22 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

1) Has Sklansky tapped Brandi?
2) Is SNG Butseks a bargain?
3) At what stakes does it become cooler to hang out with lame fishies who all play world of warcraft when you could be hanging out with your friends at a bar, or other drinking establishment.
4) Does hanging out with rockstars automatically get you unhandleable amounts of poon, even if they suck
5) Do guitar players have bigger peens than bassists
6) Do drummers always turn up late
7) Buttseks?
8) Have you ever been arrested, if so what for, if not then what would you suggest as a reasonable bribe
9) What is the coolest drug
10) When was your last fight, did you win

EDIT TO ADD: BBV would like to see you MSPaint skills, to prove you is fo real


arbuthnot
(journeyman)
07/07/07 10:31 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

k$?



Please explain. Thx.

Steve, again, thanks for answering my questions. You truly are a gentleman and a scholar.

1. If your cats could play poker, what kind of players would they be?

2. Have you ever fantasized of closing your studio and running and underground card room instead?

3. How much of a chip advantage do you think you would need in a heads-up, winner-take-all stud death-match vs. Phil Ivey?

Salut!

EDIT TO ADD: samsdmf, that's more like it! Molto Bene!


OrangeCat
(enthusiast)
07/07/07 10:45 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

I recently moved to Chicago. I really like jazz/rock/fusion kind of guitar playing. John McLaughlin, Scott Henderson, Mike Landau, Joe Satriani, Mike Stern, Wayne Krantz and the like.

Any suggestions on bands to check out here in Chicago along those lines? I’m getting tired of all the George Benson wannabes at Andy’s.


chistyle
(stranger)
07/07/07 11:04 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve, I Remember seeing you in Shellac in Brisbane in a little club once called Manhattans upstairs in the Valley around 1992, That was one interesting gig and one the stood in my mind ever since... Im just curious about when you played that gig in Bris I noticed that you strapped your guitar around your waist and up picked your guitar and picked as fast as the majority of guitar players down pick and all with a metal pick, and that you got your precision feed back on certain notes while grooving to your song...
My Question is do you still play guitar like that? or was it a phase of life you where going thru at the time ? or was it just part of the show? or is it because the gave the music some sort of ascetic appeal to you and the audience..
I think I havent seen anyone with such an unique guitar playing style since..Cheers for the show!! So do you still play in a band?
and have you been back to Australia since 1992 for more gigs?and does your studio entirely work with analogue gear ?
and do you ever use digital recording gear ? and whats your take on Stav's compression technic in Mixing with your Mind?


ZeTurd
(veteran)
07/07/07 11:32 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Man!

You've recorded Neurosis since Times of Grace. I'm in awe!

Some Neurosis/metal-related questions:

1. How is it working with Neurosis? Any amusing anecdotes?

2. How much work is it recording their often complex song arrangements? Listening to what's going on on most of their records one would assume it's a very time consuming process.

3. Can you recommend music in a similar vein to Neurosis? (excluding the obvious candidates such as Isis, Sparowes, Sum, Cult of Luna, etc.)

4. Do you listen to a lot of metal? If you are, what kind of metal are you generally listening to?

Thanks..


G Street
(member)
07/07/07 12:07 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Who sold us out on metafilter? Dang, sorry about putting the tech question here, Laziness on my part.

Banging musicians huh?

well I won't ask you any specifics about your endevors in this area, Being the gentleman you are, but heres a pretty good perv question.

Who is the sexiest Female musician that you have ever worked with? and Does the fact that she's a musician add to her sexiness for you?

and

What are you wearing?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 02:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

k$?



><24


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 02:28 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1) Has Sklansky tapped Brandi?
2) Is SNG Butseks a bargain?



These are really the same question. DUCY?

Quote:

3) At what stakes does it become cooler to hang out with lame fishies who all play world of warcraft when you could be hanging out with your friends at a bar, or other drinking establishment.



You should be raking against fishes during non-drinking hours so you don't have to make choices like this. Also, maybe you have lame friends.

Quote:

4) Does hanging out with rockstars automatically get you unhandleable amounts of poon, even if they suck



Much, much poon, but believe me I can handle. You, maybe stick to drinking with your (possibly lame) friends.

Quote:

5) Do guitar players have bigger peens than bassists



No, but their boyfriends do.

Quote:

6) Do drummers always turn up late



No, drummers have girlfriends with cars. Guitarists and singers are always late because they're on the bus.

Quote:

7) Buttseks?



YGOS?

Quote:

8) Have you ever been arrested, if so what for, if not then what would you suggest as a reasonable bribe



Yes, all sorts, hundge.

Quote:

9) What is the coolest drug



I don't take recreational drugs any more, but other people on Ketamine are a riot, because they bend like Gumby, and whatever you do to them/make them do, they'll have no memory of it.

Quote:

10) When was your last fight, did you win



I was 15, and yes.

Quote:

EDIT TO ADD: BBV would like to see you MSPaint skills, to prove you is fo real



Do not know computers well, need MSPaint instruction. Will trade for Stars or FT.


Canadian
(stranger)
07/07/07 03:05 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve - thanks for doing this.

One of my top 5 albums ever is Rid of Me. I still remember getting a copy in at my college radio station, putting on Rid of Me the song and having my ears [censored] blown off when the chorus kicked in. The songwriting is incredible and how you recorded PJ's guitar and Rob Ellis' drums really complements the material. I know that she wrote a lot of material before these sessions and put out a demos album of material later on with a couple of songs that didn't make it onto Rid of Me itself. I prefer the album versions of songs to the demos and I've always wondered, besides Reeling, what other songs did you record during those sessions that didn't make it onto the album?


village
(stranger)
07/07/07 03:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Is there some kind of message posting etiquette? The bullies seem to be picking on me. Please let me know what I've done wrong, even if you have to be insulting...

oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/07/07 03:44 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

who was the hottest musician you ever nailed?

freakiest?

give us the dirt!


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 05:38 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Is there some kind of message posting etiquette? The bullies seem to be picking on me. Please let me know what I've done wrong, even if you have to be insulting...



This thread was intended for the regular readers of this particular forum, which is a specific population of 2+2 readers who have wide-ranging interests, but are comrades in the poker/gambling culture. The thread leaked out into the general population, including music fan dorks who have no interest in this forum or site other than this rare moment when it happened to overlap into their world. The regular participants in this forum feel like you "civilians" are trespassing here, gawking, and are a nuisance.

Also:

Quote:

Top Albini questions of the moment:
1) How old were you the first time you heard Kraftwerk?



I was born in 1962, and I first heard Kraftwerk when Autobahn was a big hit, in 1974 or 75.

Quote:

2) Are you a fan of Gang of Four "Entertainment!"?



Since I have publicly expressed admiration and adulation for this band and album, oh, 1,000,000 times, I can only assume your question is an attempt to express to the rest of the reading public that you too have noticed that my guitar playing is indebted to Andy Gill's, and that Gang of Four records, especially Entertainment, are pretty good. Mission accomplished.

Quote:

3) After recording "Light Sabre [censored]-Sucking Blues", what happened in the studio? (I worship that song)



This is a profoundly stupid question. "What happened?" What do you think happened? We played it back in the studio and everybody said "yeah that's good, what's next." Did you think we started fires, painted our faces and sent up signal flares? This question is unanswerable, because it isn't actually an inquiry, it's a chance for a music dork to affirm his appreciation of McLusky, a cool band, and thereby himself cooling-up by associaton. Grow the hell up. Also, being the thirtieth reference to McLusky in this thread, it threatens to trivialize them in the way the rest of us hope to trivialize Urge Overkill.

Quote:

4) When is "awesome" going to be over?



When your ma ends her "Twofer Tuesday" both-holes special.

Quote:

5) Could you tell, during the "Surfer Rosa" sessions that you were recording EXTREMELY influential music?



As previously noted in about 10,000 different interviews, three documentary films and four books, I was not particularly a fan of the Pixies, though I respect them and harbor no animosity toward them in the least. I thought they were a fine band, but nothing special. I have already admitted in this thread that I have no clue with respect to what other people will like.

Quote:

6) Can you hear me now?



Ah, a knowing quotation from the current album of my band. How clever. Do you honestly not understand why the perceptive and sarcastic readership of this forum would be hostile?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 06:10 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I really like jazz/rock/fusion kind of guitar playing. John McLaughlin, Scott Henderson, Mike Landau, Joe Satriani, Mike Stern, Wayne Krantz and the like.



About the only local guitarists I can recommend are Nels Cline and Jeff Parker, who are nothing like the shredders you mention. For actual shredding, keep your eyes peeled for touring appearances by Marnie Stern (pretty conventional but good) or Stinking Lizaveta, an instrumental band whose guitarist, Yanni, is incredible.

Quote:

Any suggestions on bands to check out here in Chicago along those lines? I’m getting tired of all the George Benson wannabes at Andy’s.



There's a big abstract jazz/improv scene in Chicago (mentioned earlier in this thread), which gets pretty good coverage in the Reader. Check the listings, and if you've never seen one of these shows you could find it right up your alley.


arsonaut
(stranger)
07/07/07 06:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

first, id like to apologize to the forum. yes, this will probably be my first and last post.

Steve, I recently heard the new Weedeater album, and first must say that you captured their live sound PERFECTLY. I felt a flashback from seeing them a few months ago.

Do you have any entertaining stories about them? I've heard stories along the lines of them getting an advance from Century Media(garbage label), and them spending it all on hard drugs, and booze, and a large party to consume them all.


NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/07/07 06:14 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Over how many SnGs would you have to break even before you would just consider offing yourself? I think I'm getting close.

Greg P
(journeyman)
07/07/07 06:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Great thread and thanks again for doing this.

1) Talk Talk? Yes? No? Maybe so? Laughing Stock? Perfect? Bastard?
1a) Have I cooled myself up by mentioning them?

2) How true is what you wrote in the problem with music today? Are most of those pitfalls easier to avoid because of less expensive equipment? Just curious.

Thanks again.


village
(stranger)
07/07/07 06:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Thanks for answering. I won't bother you again.

felix240
(stranger)
07/07/07 06:46 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I grew up in the 80s listening to Pussy Galore, Big Black and Sonic Youth and their ilk (the sst bands, the T&G bands, etc.). It seemed like all those bands were fellow travelers, there was a legitimate scene. It seemed like, post-Nirvana, a scene of that sort was no longer possible and a sort or "are you with us or are you with them?" mentality sprung up. You and SY had some public bad blood, as did many of the underground bands that comprised that American underground 80s network. As a participant in this small historical moment (now long dead), what happened?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 07:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1. If your cats could play poker, what kind of players would they be?



Lame question.

Pip: Lesbian grinder
KP: Matusow
Mandela: Prone to card tearing, fits of cursing and other Asian lady outbursts.

Quote:

2. Have you ever fantasized of closing your studio and running and underground card room instead?



Not today, no. Yesterday about 12 times. Thursday, continuously. Wednesday 16 times. Continuously through the month of June. At least twice daily prior.

Quote:

3. How much of a chip advantage do you think you would need in a heads-up, winner-take-all stud death-match vs. Phil Ivey?



I'd need odds on the money and 10:1 in chips, assuming the ante was fixed. In a tournament format with rising antes, give him 5BB and me 15BB and I'll take my chances.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 07:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Over how many SnGs would you have to break even before you would just consider offing yourself? I think I'm getting close.



Um, SnGs? I'll say... Two. Yeah, if I broke even after two SnGs I'd figure my work there was done.


mrkristopher
(stranger)
07/07/07 07:37 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Thanks for your work with Shannon Wright, esp. Over the Sun (one of my top favs). Any thoughts on those sessions?

What are your thoughts about recording bass guitar? Direct/mic/both? Some have written that you like to bury it.

Thanks.


dhattis333
(newbie)
07/07/07 07:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

1.Whats your opinion on this statement that Bob Dylan made last year:

"I don't know anybody who's made a record that sounds decent in the past 20 years, really," ... "You listen to these modern records, they're atrocious, they have sound all over them. There's no definition of nothing, no vocal, no nothing, just like ... static."

2.Who do you think your going to vote for in the upcoming presidential election?


Jigsaws
(rock and roll pancake)
07/07/07 07:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

This thread was intended for the regular readers of this particular forum, which is a specific population of 2+2 readers who have wide-ranging interests, but are comrades in the poker/gambling culture. The thread leaked out into the general population, including music fan dorks who have no interest in this forum or site other than this rare moment when it happened to overlap into their world. The regular participants in this forum feel like you "civilians" are trespassing here, gawking, and are a nuisance.



So yeah, I've been following this thread and enjoying it, but as usual I couldn't be bothered to post. This brought me out though. Mr. Albini, I like your style.

Now that I'm here, I figure I might as well ask you a few questions.

1. For some reason, Shellac and Sonic Youth are inexplicably mixed up in my brain. Actually, I know why they're mixed up - the same woman introduced them to me. After an unhealthy obsession with her, I currently have an unhealthy obsession with Sonic Youth. I do hope Shellac won't be next. But uhm, I'm rambling - better think of a question: did you ever work with Sonic Youth in any capacity?

2. Over/under on when CarlosChadha kills himself for being stupid enough to take that $100 bet?

3. How many 5 year olds?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 07:57 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1) Talk Talk? Yes? No? Maybe so? Laughing Stock? Perfect? Bastard?



Though highly-regarded in recording circles, I've always thought the Talk Talk records were exercises in making the simple complicated, and like turning left three times instead of turning right, they seem ridiculous and don't really hold my interest.

I admit to having my palate dirtied by having first heard the horrible new-wavy pop MkI version of the band, and also having heard the equally-retarded punk version of the band (named the Reaction) doing the song "Talk Talk," so I couldn't really give the band a fair hearing.

Quote:

1a) Have I cooled myself up by mentioning them?



In the eyes of the record store guy, yes, of course. Throw in a reference to the High Llamas and you'll hit a home run.

Quote:

2) How true is what you wrote in the problem with music today? Are most of those pitfalls easier to avoid because of less expensive equipment? Just curious.



It is certainly possible to avoid the mainstream industry altogether, but that would have been my advice 15 years ago as well. It remains that if you get involved with the mainstream music business, even today, you're screwed.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 08:25 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I grew up in the 80s listening to Pussy Galore, Big Black and Sonic Youth and their ilk (the sst bands, the T&G bands, etc.). It seemed like all those bands were fellow travelers, there was a legitimate scene. It seemed like, post-Nirvana, a scene of that sort was no longer possible and a sort or "are you with us or are you with them?" mentality sprung up. You and SY had some public bad blood, as did many of the underground bands that comprised that American underground 80s network. As a participant in this small historical moment (now long dead), what happened?



You have summarized events pretty nicely. What happened was the overt polarization of the underground into two camps, those who thought they could follow in the footsteps of Sonic Youth and (more importantly) Nirvana, and breach the barricades of popular culture, and those who thought such aspirations were not just unlikely but ill-advised. Such mainstream gamesmanship was unprofitable, and by removing bands and resources from the underground was destructive to the underground culture, which had been flourishing, and usually led to the demise of the bands who took their shot.

An era of competitiveness ensued, with bands, clubs and labels trying hard to get noticed by the big players in the conventional old-school music business, and a veneer of professionalism interceded between people who had previously dealt with each other as real people.

The whole thing creeped me out and destroyed a lot of bands. That there were bands in the scene urging other bands on in this rat race seemed almost treasonous.

That said, I have always gotten along with Sonic Youth, and I consider them friends despite our differences in the culture wars, and they have been specifically kind to me and my bands over the years.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 08:34 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1.Whats your opinion on this statement that Bob Dylan made last year:

"I don't know anybody who's made a record that sounds decent in the past 20 years, really," ... "You listen to these modern records, they're atrocious, they have sound all over them. There's no definition of nothing, no vocal, no nothing, just like ... static."



Given that Bob probably isn't combing the mom-and-pop stores for independent releases, I can't really fault his observation. And it's a nice turn of phrase.

Quote:

2.Who do you think your going to vote for in the upcoming presidential election?



Anything the Democrats run out there, I'll vote for it. Broken piece of elk antler, chalkboard eraser, whatever.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/07/07 08:54 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

did you ever work with Sonic Youth in any capacity?



In 1982 or so, they couldn't get a gig in Chicago, so I booked them as an independent promoter, and did a couple more gigs for them in the next couple of years. They regularly crashed at my place when in Chicago during the early 80s. My bands have played shows with them over the years, but that's about it. I've never recorded them.

Quote:

2. Over/under on when CarlosChadha kills himself for being stupid enough to take that $100 bet?



It's a hundred bucks. If it gets annoying, he might just call it quits and pay off -- it's the equivalent of 1.25 BB in his usual game. Not suicide-worthy.

Quote:

3. How many 5 year olds?



Ha! My favorite prop! I think I could take a couple dozen at least. You kill a couple in front of their friends and they'll run away crying like little kids. Because they're little kids. Five-year-olds run away crying over nothing all the time anyway. I don't think anybody willing to kill a couple of five-year-olds to prove a point would have anything to fear.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/08/07 12:33 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

How is it working with Neurosis? How much work is it recording their often complex song arrangements? Listening to what's going on on most of their records one would assume it's a very time consuming process.



Not particularly. Neurosis are pretty meticulous in having their act together before they come into the studio, and Noah (their keyboard/electronics guy) has a studio where they work on pre-production demos in detail.

Quote:

3. Can you recommend music in a similar vein to Neurosis? (excluding the obvious candidates such as Isis, Sparowes, Sum, Cult of Luna, etc.)



You may already be familiar with them, but obvious suggestions would be Harvey Milk, Melvins, Pelican, Zeni Geva, Oxbow, Mono, Om, Sunn0))) and Dazzling Killmen. You might also enjoy the power electronics/noise music like Whitehouse, Japanese noise guitarist Keiji Haino, and early material from Swans and Killing Joke.

Quote:

4. Do you listen to a lot of metal? If you are, what kind of metal are you generally listening to?



My standard answer for this is that I listen to the sort of metal that appeals to non-metal guys like me. The bands mentioned above, Motorhead, High on Fire, and the occasional black metal classic from Burzum, Immortal and the like.


sydb
(stranger)
07/08/07 07:15 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve,

I once read the tour diary you wrote during Big Black, and one thing that kinda stuck with me and made me smile was something you said about the Wipers. Something along the lines of Greg Sage's sound being so simple and yet so mindblowing-ly effective, it made you think twice about any kind of bells and whistles approach. With that example of just brilliance and raw power, and the other extreme of brilliance but with the bells and whistles added of say Sonic Youth, who have gone through their share of effects pedals and other crazy complications to their sound so to speak... this is a longwinded way of asking, but are there any other bands that go for that more complicated approach (without sounding like Sonic Youth), using various pedals or loopers or whatever tech in an effective way (as a live band) that you've been wow'ed by, rather than thought 'what the gay are you doing here'?

Also, due to some other thing you said in regards to some awful NY band I forget the name of, I bought the My Dad Is Dead album 'The Taller You Are..The Shorter You Get'. I have to thank you for that, because I spent a good year listening to it and find something new to love about it almost every time I put it on.


felix240
(stranger)
07/08/07 09:26 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I got one more:

You produced some interesting prose for Forced Exposure magazine back in the 80s, and your literate answers here betray some kinda writerly (or writer-like) attention to detail on a sentence by sentence basis (over and above (it seems to me) mere utilitarian conveyance of info).

So: Did this precision grow out of writing about recording? Did the need for precision in technical writing become a "style"?
And: Do you have any literary ambitions (even compiling a collection of old stuff for publication)?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/08/07 12:39 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

...are there any other bands that go for that more complicated approach (without sounding like Sonic Youth), using various pedals or loopers or whatever tech in an effective way (as a live band) that you've been wow'ed by, rather than thought 'what the gay are you doing here'?



It takes a diligent approach to turn your sound over to a bunch of pedals and not have it sound retarded. You basically have to rebuild your playing vocabulary around the effects. Very few bands can pull this off, but Chrome, Head of David and the Kiwi band High Dependency Unit (HDU) come to mind immediately. All great.


Triumph36
(Good Citizen)
07/08/07 02:20 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

hey,

you mentioned philip glass and gorecki as some of your favorite composers - what in particular do you enjoy most by them?

this thread officially wins bbv - except for all the new posters asking their music nerd questions


playwithfire233
(stranger)
07/08/07 03:08 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve Albini. Your awesome. If you could work with any musician dead or alive who would it be?

Whats your favorite record?


doyoucompute
(stranger)
07/08/07 04:29 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Why don't you nerds quit complaining about people like me coming here to register just to post one time.

My question is: why does monkey trick sound so different from the rest of Goat?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/08/07 06:01 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

hey,

you mentioned philip glass and gorecki as some of your favorite composers - what in particular do you enjoy most by them?



Gorecki for me is always personified by Op36 Symphony of Eleven Sorrowful Songs, but I heard a radio broadcast of Op44 Miserere which was totally spellbinding, and I have it on my to-get list. Glass, I like the Tomato volume of Dances 1-3 and I have a fantastic Italian boxed-set version of Einstein on the Beach which is one of the best vinyl pressings of his music I've heard. I'll admit to not being too into his later operas, but his film-and-music collaborations have been amazing.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/08/07 06:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Why don't you nerds quit complaining about people like me coming here to register just to post one time.

My question is: why does monkey trick sound so different from the rest of Goat?



Well, it sounds different because the snare drum is damped and the room ambience is closer. Also, you're a little prick.


NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/08/07 06:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Why don't you nerds quit complaining about people like me coming here to register just to post one time.



This is funny.


Triumph36
(Good Citizen)
07/08/07 07:05 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

hey,

you mentioned philip glass and gorecki as some of your favorite composers - what in particular do you enjoy most by them?



Gorecki for me is always personified by Op36 Symphony of Eleven Sorrowful Songs, but I heard a radio broadcast of Op44 Miserere which was totally spellbinding, and I have it on my to-get list. Glass, I like the Tomato volume of Dances 1-3 and I have a fantastic Italian boxed-set version of Einstein on the Beach which is one of the best vinyl pressings of his music I've heard. I'll admit to not being too into his later operas, but his film-and-music collaborations have been amazing.




Miserere is phenomenal - I honestly think it is better than Sorrowful Songs, and I am not ever a fan of a capella work in any genre.

As for Glass, I agree there too - have you heard many of the 'new' recordings of his - i.e. the Nonesuch re-recording of Einstein on the Beach? They seem to take a lot of the life out of them in favor of a fuller, more balanced sound - all the tinny Farfisa organs seem to be gone, and the most interesting elements are shoved to the background. Since you actually know something about these things, I'm curious what you think of the older, rawer sounding Glass - and also whether it's honestly better on vinyl, since I'm not a vinyl guy at all.


SaulPaul
(member)
07/08/07 07:19 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

is it true thaty kurt cobain didnt really exist and it just an elaborate consipracy by the far right to get them to kill them selves so the right could become more powerful?

cos im not sure i believe this, but ive heard it from pretty reliable sources


pivot
(stranger)
07/08/07 07:24 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

hi electrical,

let's say if i think im a pretty good producer, programmer and sound designer (for a 26 year old) .. how would i be best to go about finding management or someone to help me obtain and negotiate professional work.

thanks for your time.


doyoucompute
(stranger)
07/08/07 07:46 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


Well, it sounds different because the snare drum is damped and the room ambience is closer. Also, you're a little prick.




Sorry, I didn't mean to be so rude. It was just annoying to me that everyone was complaining about that.

Was that a choice made beforehand for that song or did it happen while the session was happening? Damn great song, probably my favorite.


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/08/07 07:54 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

G7 Welcoming Committee in Canada recently decided to stop pressing music onto a physical disc and release everything strictly as digital downloads. Do you think that this will catch on and become the norm for independent labels?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/08/07 09:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

let's say if i think im a pretty good producer, programmer and sound designer (for a 26 year old) .. how would i be best to go about finding management or someone to help me obtain and negotiate professional work.



I do not have a manager, I have never needed one, and I don't recommend them.

In this business, except for generic dollars-an-hour hack work (where you, rather than somebody else, records 100 iterations of the word "stop" for a talking traffic cop doll), an engineer doesn't find work, the work finds him. People use you for a session because they specifically think you will do a good job, and for them to think that, you need to develop a working clientele who will say your name out loud.

I can only advise you in the manner that I eventually became a full-time engineer. You should start by hanging out with people whose music you understand, and who think like you do. Make yourself available to them, and those people will let you help them make recordings.

First you work for free, then they cover your expenses, and eventually you will become valuable to a peer group who also compose your client base. Through word of mouth, your work will eventually become worth something (in real money terms) to them, and they will pay you what they can afford.

The time lapsed between the first free demos I recorded for bands and the moment I could afford to quit my straight job and work in recording full-time was about 8 years. I don't see how I could have done it faster.

You can also just wait for somebody to throw gigs at your feet. Good luck with that.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/08/07 09:05 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

G7 Welcoming Committee in Canada recently decided to stop pressing music onto a physical disc and release everything strictly as digital downloads. Do you think that this will catch on and become the norm for independent labels?



This then puts the label on exactly the same terms as a novice band with nothing but a demo and a Myspace page. If I were a band faced with the choice of a label who would sell nothing but downloads and selling those self-same downloads myself (and keeping all the money), I'd have no use for the label.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/08/07 10:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Miserere is phenomenal - I honestly think it is better than Sorrowful Songs, and I am not ever a fan of a capella work in any genre.



Just hit Amazon on your recommendation. I realized I didn't really have an excuse not to have it.

Quote:

As for Glass, I agree there too - have you heard many of the 'new' recordings of his - i.e. the Nonesuch re-recording of Einstein on the Beach?



I have not heard them. Although he took great pains to erase the human element of his pieces, one of the great satisfactions of listening to his more demanding pieces is thinking about the poor bastards who had to play it, and the very rare performance nuance that sneaks in emphasizes the real human accomplishment.

Digital recording and editing were probably a godsend in the mind of the "pure" composer, in that they allow literally "perfect" transcriptions to be recorded, but I remain more impressed by music actually performed by people. Raymond Scott used to pine for a machine that could play his compositions, and even made a crude electro-mechanical sequencer to play some backing parts for tape recordings, because he was frustrated by the struggling of his band to play to his exacting standards. As it turns out, the struggle is one of the most engaging parts of a Raymond Scott tune. I shudder to think how awful his music would be if actually performed by samplers in perfect lockstep.

Conlon Nancarrow embraced the mechanical player piano for his compositions, but he had to adapt his notation and composition to the quirks of the piano, and this is where the tension between composition and performance displays itself and makes his music worth hearing. Take a look at his scores sometime -- they're like somebody shot two barrels of birdshot at a page of staff rule. If he could just type it into a sequencer and have it come out like water, I doubt he would have come up with any of his little temporal innovations like the constant accelerando, or the simultaneous regressing/accellerating lines. In particular, I wonder at what he called his "X-shape," where two themes played simultaneously; one playing forward accelerating in tempo, while another played in reverse, de-celerating, creating a central eddy motif where the two lines synchronize for some time.

This "X-shape" must have resulted from the discovering that he could punch a roll and then re-thread it in reverse to punch a counterpart composition. Perhaps he accidentally threaded a roll without rewinding it one day. These little epiphanies are only possible if your band or performance device once-in-a-while occasions accidents, and I am grateful Nancarrow did his work before midi sequencers and digital pianos were available.


PWHerman
(journeyman)
07/08/07 11:19 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

This is the greatest thread in 2+2 history, not close.





mikebarr
(stranger)
07/08/07 11:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi
Whats your opinion on the overuse of technology in today’s rock music? To me the lacks of authenticity and a sense of realism.


TopTop
(stranger)
07/09/07 12:15 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

How would you feel about working with Nickelback? What would you do to improve upon their already amazing sound?

Andy B
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/09/07 12:19 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

You are aware that I'm a tuba player. One thing that I cannot stand is when some sound guy wants to stick a microphone in my bell. The sound of a tuba is the sound it makes as it fills a room. Judging from your comments on recording strings, I'm guessing you appreciate where I'm coming from. Apparently, you've recorded at least one tuba player. How do you mike a tuba?

How do you really feel about Urge Overkill?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 12:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

How would you feel about working with Nickelback? What would you do to improve upon their already amazing sound?



Man, don't mess with the formula.


ChrisMoise
(stranger)
07/09/07 01:10 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Any idea why no outtakes from the In Utereo sessions were on the Nirvana box? I was hoping to get at least a few alternate takes from the Pachyderm sessions. Do you know if the alternate takes have vocals?

Thanks in advance.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 01:37 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

You are aware that I'm a tuba player. One thing that I cannot stand is when some sound guy wants to stick a microphone in my bell. The sound of a tuba is the sound it makes as it fills a room. Judging from your comments on recording strings, I'm guessing you appreciate where I'm coming from. Apparently, you've recorded at least one tuba player. How do you mike a tuba?



Attributes of individual instruments can make them easier or more difficult to record accurately. Tuba has about four bummer characteristics, making it a bigger bitch than almost anything short of a temperemental soprano:

1) Low fundamental frequencies correspond to long acoustic wavelengths. These need a large acoustic space to avoid self-cancellation or booming ("wolf" tones). A low E natural is about 40 feet long, and cannot be properly resolved without either a very good bass trap or a large acoustic space, and both bass traps and empty space require real estate.

2) Extremely wide frequency response. Simultaneous with the low fundamental frequencies are a blistering array of higher partials, harmonics and violent transients typical to horns. Picking this stuff up requires a microphone and signal path that can comfortably pass (phase-linear) components in the 30kHz range. That's where the "fraap!" resides. Appropriate microphones are somewhat esoteric, and don't necessarily have a lot of other utility, so investing in microphones appropriate for horn recording is often a marginally -EV business decision.

3)The instrument is physically large, and sound radiates not just from the bell of the horn, but also from the body, and an isolated pickup pattern is not very accurate, so it needs to be recorded from a distance. A distant mic will by necessity be exposed to every other sound in the room, so it becomes not just a "tuba" mic, and the penalty for trying to record a tuba is losing control of every other sound in the session.

4) Tuba players are weird.

So how do I record tuba? In a big room, with a ribbon mic (specifically an STC 4038 or a Royer 122) not too close to the bell, through a wide-bandwidth mic preamp (GML most recently) and a separate distant microphone to pick up the room sound.

Quote:

How do you really feel about Urge Overkill?



Pretty much like everybody else.


Andy B
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/09/07 01:41 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

My other question that I forgot to ask is if you've ever seen anyone fry a ribbon mike.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 01:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

My other question that I forgot to ask is if you've ever seen anyone fry a ribbon mike.



We have a couple hundred budgeted each year for re-ribboning microphones. Accidents (and inexperienced freelance engineers) happen.


antiexplode
(stranger)
07/09/07 02:07 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

yeah, i know - first time poster, linked from stereogum, how annoying. but i read this:

"I think you're a defeatist and you are destined not to enjoy music. If you wait for other people to thrust music under your nose, you'll be listening to nothing but crap for a long while, because that's what gets thrust at us. Music is not a spectator sport."

and had to repeat it. well said steve. see you at the tables - FT name: antiexplode.

heart - dave


endoskeleton
(stranger)
07/09/07 09:40 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

steve, what do you think of sheryl crow's "anything but down"?

it's awesome, isn't it


Triumph36
(Good Citizen)
07/09/07 10:09 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

I don't know much of Nancarrow - heard one piece played live at Carnegie Hall this year - but you've convinced me to check it out.

Some of the best innovations in music definitely came by accident - Steve Reich's discovery of 'phasing' and Brian Eno's tape loop experiments come to mind.


arbuthnot
(journeyman)
07/09/07 10:09 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve, can you ask the people who are going to post for the first time in this thread, before they do so (or even after), to please sign up at a poker site and post their screen names?

I see that member 'antiexplode' has already had the foresight to do so.

Two more questions:

What's your motto?

What does every girl really want?

Thx, and nice title.


larsxchristian
(stranger)
07/09/07 11:37 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

how did you like working with serena maneesh?

i heard a rumour that you'll be working with silver as well.
what do you think of what you've heard of them before?

-a curious norwegian


oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/09/07 11:40 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

this has turned into a "State an obscure band or musician that Steve Albini has worked with" thread

antiexplode
(stranger)
07/09/07 12:10 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

i'm not sure if foresight is the right word, arbuthnot, since i've been playing as antiexplode on FT and pokerroom for something like 4 or 5 years now, but i do get what you're getting at. which also made me think of a couple questions:

how has your game changed since the chris moneymaker won the WSOP? do you play in enough public tourneys or public games to make it rich/get extremely frustrated by lucky newbies?

in NLHE, how do you play low pocket pairs? this question is kind of for every poker player, i couldn't find a thread on here for it (maybe someone can post a link?).

heart - dave


rapidacid
(old hand)
07/09/07 01:29 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do artists mostly come to you to with work, or do you ever actively seek out a band you'd like to record with?

Do you think you could make a great album with a band like Tortoise?

Favorite album of all time?

Best concert moment?


Dumbjaw
(stranger)
07/09/07 01:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I would love to hear about anything having to do with your work with Barkmarket. I've been a huge fan of them since the mid-90s and, for a while, ran the only Barkmarket webpage that I knew about. Unfortunately, I was unable to see them live when they were still together; I do have a small collection of live video/audio material from them, but that's about it (other than the studio releases).

They're one of the more underrated bands of the 90s. Their grooves, time signatures, non-stop Dave Sardy growling -- the whole thing was really something else.

So, yeah -- anything related to Barkmarket, I'd LOVE to hear it!


skery
(stranger)
07/09/07 02:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

your comments on Urge Overkill make me think they're Bitch Slap!

of course I know you aren't mixerman, but you must have some similar stories of recording sessions gone wrong, anything in particular?

I seem to remember you writing a diatribe on the loudness wars at some point. Any thoughts on how to stop the mangling of music and allowing dynamics back?

How has your experiment with the different quality levels of downloads worked out? do you see people care about sound quality anymore?

Does it ever frustrate you to know that you take such time and dedication to getting "that perfect drum sound", and the vast majority of people listening wouldn't know the difference if it took you an hour to set up the snare mic or just taped a plastic realistic mic to the head? (of course, that just might be the perfect drum sound, studio experimentation sure is fun!)

thanks for still making records on tape. though I've recorded digitally due to convenience, there is nothing like a properly recorded analog recording. If only there were more like you.

been checking out 2+2 for years, never expected to be posting about drum recording here!


PaperFace
(stranger)
07/09/07 02:58 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What can you tell me about a Croatian band called SexA? I heard that you had wanted to work with them at some point in the past. Were you involved with them in any way (friends/collaborations?) Can we expect anything from you and SexA in the future?

peyoteugly
(stranger)
07/09/07 02:59 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

i think 18th Dye's 'tribute to a bus' is one of the best and best SOUNDING albums ever.
a. how awesome was it to see those songs coming together?
b. why is that band so slept on?
cheers


arbuthnot
(journeyman)
07/09/07 03:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

i think 18th Dye's 'tribute to a bus' is one of the best and best SOUNDING albums ever.



Seconded.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 04:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I don't know much of Nancarrow - heard one piece played live at Carnegie Hall this year - but you've convinced me to check it out.



I would skip the stuff he wrote for conventional ensembles until you've had a chance to hear the player piano stuff. I don't even recommend hearing any of the human-performed four-handed transcriptions, since there are some amazing whirlwind glissando effects that only really work on the mechanical pianos. There's a terrific annotated 4-disc set of the "complete studies for player piano" that shows up on eBay now and again, and the old vinyl editions are excellent recordings of Nancarrow's own pianos, in his studio, supervised by Nancarrow himself.


Hey_Porter
(old hand)
07/09/07 04:15 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

This thread is excellent, but I can't help thinking of this onion article (one of my favs), especially with all of the newbie posters:
http://www.theonion.com/content/node/27870


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/09/07 04:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I missed a hundred posts or so, so forgive me if this has been asked.

What are your favorite "outlaw" country performers besides Willie? Anything obscure you might recommend that most fans of the genre would not know about?


Hey_Porter
(old hand)
07/09/07 04:22 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I missed a hundred posts or so, so forgive me if this has been asked.

What are your favorite "outlaw" country performers besides Willie? Anything obscure you might recommend that most fans of the genre would not know about?




I'd like to add to this, and ask what it is about Willie Nelson that you like so much?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 04:37 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

steve, what do you think of sheryl crow's "anything but down"?

it's awesome, isn't it



I am unfamiliar with this song. I am actually unfamiliar with Sheryl Crow's music, except for what Bob plays in the van, but every time I see her in videos or what have you, I wonder if she likes it in the can.

I wonder why that is?


oddjob
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/09/07 04:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

steve, what do you think of sheryl crow's "anything but down"?

it's awesome, isn't it



I am unfamiliar with this song. I am actually unfamiliar with Sheryl Crow's music, except for what Bob plays in the van, but every time I see her in videos or what have you, I wonder if she likes it in the can.

I wonder why that is?




all girls do.


Georgia Avenue
(BBV Film Director)
07/09/07 05:26 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve: Swingo is my new favorite game and i would like to wager all my moneys on it.

Regarding something you said earlier...my roomate and I (he posts here as G-street) have been in a running argument about something Henry Rollins said on his show... about bands selling out their music to commercials. His claim: Who cares? Let good musician make a few bucks being appreciated now that they are respected instead of dismissed and ignored. Yet you said earlier that you get creeped out and disgusted when you see it happen, and you feel that they've let their fans down. Do artists really have some kinda responsibility to their audiences...even though, as you say, the best records are made without giving a crap what the public thinks?

I want Iggy to be as rich and popular as Justin Timberlake, yet I can't listen to Lust for Life without picturing some douchebag on a Carnival Cruise galavanting in the briny surf with his fat kids. Is this my problem or his or something in between?

Poker question: Would you ever put your tournament life in on a draw? If so, would you kick yourself in the nuts for using the term tournament life?

lol rockaments,
--GA


ZeTurd
(veteran)
07/09/07 05:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Steve: Swingo is my new favorite game and i would like to wager all my moneys on it.

Regarding something you said earlier...my roomate and I (he posts here as G-street) have been in a running argument about something Henry Rollins said on his show... about bands selling out their music to commercials. His claim: Who cares? Let good musician make a few bucks being appreciated now that they are respected instead of dismissed and ignored. Yet you said earlier that you get creeped out and disgusted when you see it happen, and you feel that they've let their fans down. Do artists really have some kinda responsibility to their audiences...even though, as you say, the best records are made without giving a crap what the public thinks?

I want Iggy to be as rich and popular as Justin Timberlake, yet I can't listen to Lust for Life without picturing some douchebag on a Carnival Cruise galavanting in the briny surf with his fat kids. Is this my problem or his or something in between?

Poker question: Would you ever put your tournament life in on a draw? If so, would you kick yourself in the nuts for using the term tournament life?

lol rockaments,
--GA



QFWTKTATTM

(Quoted for wanting to know the answers to this myself)


SinglePoster
(stranger)
07/09/07 05:54 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I saw that Nancarrow piece at Carnegie Hall as well. It was performed by Bang On a Can & was a transcription they did of one of his piano pieces. Really great.

Steve, have you started recording with OM yet? How does that usually work with bands you have not worked with before - they send you a demo of what they want to record or do you have no idea what they want to record until you all get in the studio?


killsadie
(Pooh-Bah)
07/09/07 06:16 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

tell me more about milemarker.

suchashame
(stranger)
07/09/07 06:22 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Not sure if you answered it but I would love to know about the Rudimentary Peni sessions. As far as I can tell you've never mentioned it on your forum.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 07:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Steve: Swingo is my new favorite game and i would like to wager all my moneys on it.



Come to Chicago on any Tuesday and look me up.

Quote:

...something Henry Rollins said on his show... about bands selling out their music to commercials. His claim: Who cares? Let good musician make a few bucks being appreciated now that they are respected instead of dismissed and ignored.



Precisely the answer you'd expect from the Voice of GM Trucks. It's an argument that holds absolutely no water.

To say that an artist with a legion of devoted fans and a culturally-significant body of work is being "dismissed and ignored" is ridiculous prima facie and doesn't really need further debunking. What he's talking about is money. Whenever anybody starts justifying taking money with language derived from some other consideration, he's actually talking about the money.

I cannot fault anybody for taking money for their work, especially in dire circumstances (people often do degrading things for money, especially in dire circumstances), but it is ludicrous to suggest that as a fan (a participant in the celebration that made the song "Lust for Life" a valuable commodity in the first place) I shouldn't notice that it has happened, and that it shouldn't change the meaning of the song in my estimation. Of course I will, and of course it does. Previously, "Lust for Life" had been an ode to decadence, written and performed in a frenzy of cocaine, heroin bingeing and buggery. It has now become a mormon-worthy family-fun cruise jingle. Of course it has changed.

Quote:

Do artists really have some kinda responsibility to their audiences...even though, as you say, the best records are made without giving a crap what the public thinks?



No, they owe us nothing. That also means that my enthusiasm for artists isn't bulletproof, and I owe them no allegiance either. If they become something I cannot get behind, then they are likely to lose me as a fan.

Quote:

I want Iggy to be as rich and popular as Justin Timberlake



Rich, okay, but what benefit is it to the world to have douchebags and Justin Timberlake fans listening to Iggy Pop? Not everything is for everybody, and I don't think everything is universally improved if you lay it on with a ladle.

Quote:

Poker question: Would you ever put your tournament life in on a draw?



If you're not willing to move-in with 21 outs on the flop, you're not really playing poker. If you mean calling-off with a bare eight-out draw, then I'd need to be somewhat desperate.
Quote:

If so, would you kick yourself in the nuts for using the term tournament life?



You used the term, dipstick, not me.


mikebarr
(stranger)
07/09/07 07:17 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you lost the drive to be a great sound engineer? Ive found some people lose their enthusiasm when it is a full time job.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 07:29 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What are your favorite "outlaw" country performers besides Willie? Anything obscure you might recommend that most fans of the genre would not know about?



There are a lot of under-appreciated roots/country guys out there. I would suggest Johnny Dowd and Buddy Miller, and for crazy playing, nobody beats Junior Brown. In the Waylon/Willie/Merle triumvirate, I always liked Willie's personality more, and he wrote better songs.

The man wrote "Crazy," and for that alone, there ought to be a statue of him someplace.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 07:36 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Not sure if you answered it but I would love to know about the Rudimentary Peni sessions. As far as I can tell you've never mentioned it on your forum.



During a period when Rudimentary Peni were on hiatus, Grant and Jon made a multitrack recording of themselves playing a few songs, and I added guitar at my studio in Chicago. I asked Jay Tiller (of Couch Flambeau) to be the vocalist, and the tapes were eventually finished. There was never a release made of this Rudimentary Tiller-bini master, and eventually Rudimentary Peni came back into activity with their own records.

I honestly can't say why we never bothered releasing it, except that it wasn't a real band, and so nobody had any strong ambition with it.


mikebarr
(stranger)
07/09/07 08:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do you have any tips on capturing a good rock snare? I don't have decent dynamic mic's (only sm57 and 58)and seem to always overload any condesor that I put near it.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 08:15 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Do you have any tips on capturing a good rock snare? I don't have decent dynamic mic's (only sm57 and 58)and seem to always overload any condesor that I put near it.



Looks like it's time to buy a microphone or two.

Readily-available modestly-priced mics that work well on snare: Sennheiser 421, Beyer M201, Shure KSM141. Start there.


mikebarr
(stranger)
07/09/07 08:27 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Any thoughts on the aspect of capturing a performance as opposed to isolated, overdubbed style of many recordings today.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 08:37 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What's your motto?



It's easier to apologize afterwards than get permission first.

Quote:

What does every girl really want?



Another pair of shoes, someone to call a whore and a reason to cry.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 09:14 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Do artists mostly come to you to with work, or do you ever actively seek out a band you'd like to record with?



I am uncomfortable putting a band on the spot, so I virtually never approach bands about wanting to work for them. If a band is interested in having me work on a record, they probably know how to find me (FT medium stakes stud tables).

Quote:

Favorite album of all time?



Stooges Fun House

Quote:

Best concert moment?



Saw Flipper in the fall of 1981, and they finished their set with a song called "the Wheel," inviting everybody on stage to sing along. My buddy John Bohnen and I did likewise, and since the vocal mics had crowds around them, he started singing into the mic on the guitar amp. Not to be outdone, I stuck my head in the bass drum and sang into the bass drum microphone. That was pretty loud.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 09:52 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

A guy who doesn't want to be associated with the theft of intellectual property sent me a question privately, and I am posting it here on his behalf.

And don't ask me who it is. He's already got sand in his vagina about copyright and I don't want him further irritated.

Quote:

A friend recently suggested that perhaps bands should just accept that there is a new paradigm. People are going to copy their music, and the way that they're going to make their money is from touring, merchandise, etc. You made a comment that suggested to me that you might agree with this. Care to comment?



My long experience with bands and musicians has taught me that they understand their place in the world pretty well. They also understand that music is (always has been) free to consume. If you play your radio, it costs nothing to listen. If you walk by an open window while someone is playing an album, it costs nothing. If you stand outside a club and listen, it costs nothing. Music is free. Musicians often sing and play informally (get this!) just for fun.

Records, concert tickets and the use of music in commerce -- those things cost money.

The primary relationship that drives all parts of the music business is the relationship between a band and its audience. Record retailers, labels, producers, managers, lawyers, promoters and other parasitic professionals all subsist on whatever money they can siphon off of this fundamental relationship. Mechanical and broadcast royalties (the royalties supposedly "lost" through file sharing) are the part of this transaction that is least efficient in getting money to the artist because most of it is siphoned-off by the rest of the music industry. Of a $15 sale, the average band stuck on a major label may not receive a single penny, and amortized over the life of a release may receive (after all the other players take their rake) a buck or so.

I should note that entrepreneurial independent labels that operate on a profit-sharing model can be an order of magnitude more efficient, and that one of the efficiencies is the lack of promotional outlay required because fan file sharing does the promotion for free

In short, these "lost" royalties are a huge part of the revenue stream of the institutional part of the mainstream music business, but a miniscule part of the income of a band.

Almost universally, bands and musicians are happy anyone is interested in their music enough to become a fan, and they know there are many opportunities to do some business with such a person that may or may not involve selling him a particular record.

They also recognize that a download by someone unwilling to buy a record is not a "lost sale," because that person has made it clear that he is unwilling to buy a record. You haven't lost a sale, you've made a fan for free. Fans eventually want to buy records, concert tickets and other things.

A single sale = a small bet.
A lifetime fan = a huge pot.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/09/07 10:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What can you tell me about a Croatian band called SexA? I heard that you had wanted to work with them at some point in the past. Were you involved with them in any way (friends/collaborations?) Can we expect anything from you and SexA in the future?



I had two excellent Sexa records, a single, "Pussy In the Sky With Diamonds" and the album No Sleep Till Pussy. At some point in the 90s they moved to Rotterdam, I believe, but stayed together, although I don't know of any more recordings.


iggy
(member)
07/09/07 10:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

This is a great thread and you are awesome.

retake
(stranger)
07/10/07 08:26 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

hail great burghers of poker, this lowly music dork is sorry for the intrusion



question 1.

Did you create your guitar sound specifically to fit an idea of what your music should sound like, or have you always played in a similar way?

question 2.

Do you still work seven days a week to keep your Studio running or are things getting a bit easier?

question 3

For how long would you feel happy to leave your cats on their own?

question 4

The new stooges 12" here in Europe features a black sticker on the front saying "recorded with steve albini", and a web address on the back saying "Go here to buy Stooges ring tones". If you could change one of these things, which one would you choose to remove?

question 5

Do your question and answer sessions at gigs attract more antagonistic questions than genuine inquiries, and if so is that really the point?


mikebarr
(stranger)
07/10/07 08:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Could you please reply to this? It is partly for institutional purposes but mostly for my own studies.

Any thoughts on the aspect of capturing a performance as opposed to isolated, overdubbed style of many recordings today. I feel the comfort of not only the performers but also utilising the dynamics between musicians is paramount. Do you agree with this?


angeldustone
(stranger)
07/10/07 10:58 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Regarding your opinons on reverb: How do you feel about a vocalist who desires to have a heavy amount of reverb on their voice when recording vocals. Will you suggest/implement adding it to their headphone mix but NOT laying it to tape?

I ask because in my limited engineering experience (and own personal singing experience) I've found that a fair amount of reverb can make a vocalist more confident and/or can influence the actual performance for better or worse going to tape (i.e. holding notes longer than they would if hearing a completely dry vocal through headphones). A good example would be with say Jeff Buckley who had a tremendously strong and powerful voice, but seemed to frequenlty request reverb on his voice during live performances.

Have you come across this type of thing and if so, what are your opinons on the topic. Thanks in advance.


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/10/07 01:28 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


There are a lot of under-appreciated roots/country guys out there. I would suggest Johnny Dowd and Buddy Miller, and for crazy playing, nobody beats Junior Brown. In the Waylon/Willie/Merle triumvirate, I always liked Willie's personality more, and he wrote better songs.





Junior Brown is incredible...I've been a fan since I saw him on some late night talk show 10 years or so ago. I'll have to check out Johnny Dowd and Buddy Miller.

Dale Watson is very good, even if his new CD sounds ALOT like old Cash. Worth a listen if you haven't checked him out yet.

I think the accepted breakdown is Willie > Waylon > Merle of those 3. Actually I never really cared much for Haggard unless he was singing with Willie. Blasphemy?


Cillian
(stranger)
07/10/07 01:55 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What was glen hansard like to work with?

stabn
(going to the mattresses)
07/10/07 02:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

electrical,

I'm not really as into music as most of the people in this thread. I also had no idea who you were before it or who most of the bands being talked about are.
However, it was a great read and probably one of the top 3 ask me threads on 2p2. Thanks for doing it.


commodore crush
(stranger)
07/10/07 02:25 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

Knowing that you tend to frown upon people video taping your live shows and even calling them out from time to time, I was surprised to come across a weird Big Black VHS a few years back at a local "indie" video store in Michigan. It looked like you were playing in a really small bar on the floor and that there were maybe 10 people at the show. Also, there were really cheesy (probably innovative for the time) video wipes and dissolves inserted in between songs and some weird slow motion 8 bit effects added over songs.

I guess I'm asking if this was a legit release or a bootleg? The camera seems to be on a tripod right in front of the stage in plain view, and if I remember correctly, there may have even been several camera angels. As far as I've ever known, the Pig Pile VHS was the only legit release.


oeuff
(stranger)
07/10/07 04:30 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I witnessed Shellac at ATP nightmare before christmas a few years back having taken a cocktail of shrooms, weed and ale. You sounded like Tontos Expanding Head Band. Was this intentional?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/10/07 06:54 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Did you create your guitar sound specifically to fit an idea of what your music should sound like, or have you always played in a similar way?



I have pretty much always had a weird guitar sound. My early heroes were Johnny Ramone, Ricky Wilson, Keith Levine, Santiago Durango, Colin Newman and Andy Gill. I later came to appreciate (steal from) Billy Gibbons and Wilco Johnson as well.

Quote:

Do you still work seven days a week to keep your Studio running or are things getting a bit easier?



For about 18 months I have been successful in giving myself one day a week off, typically Tuesdays.

Quote:

For how long would you feel happy to leave your cats on their own?



Not more than 24 hours.
Quote:

The new stooges 12" here in Europe features a black sticker on the front saying "recorded with steve albini", and a web address on the back saying "Go here to buy Stooges ring tones". If you could change one of these things, which one would you choose to remove?



Well, putting my name on a Stooges record is a bit like mentioning their barbers. I'm proud of the association, I loved working on their record, and I'm thrilled to have spent time in their company, so I'm flattered that they mention me, but also a little embarrassed because they are so much more important than me. I guess the ringtone thing is a little weird.

Quote:

Do your question and answer sessions at gigs attract more antagonistic questions than genuine inquiries, and if so is that really the point?



We have Q&A at the gigs because it makes the event more of a two-way experience, rather than ust just spraying noise all over the audience, they also get to have a little conversation with us. I enjoy it, though it can be an excuse for people to act like ay-holes.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/10/07 07:01 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What was glen hansard like to work with?



Like a supermagnet for cooze.


offyerhead
(stranger)
07/10/07 07:09 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

C'mon...throw me a bone: The Wedding Present. Awesome in general or did you (ie. Seamonsters) make them better than they are entitled to be remembered as.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/10/07 07:17 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Knowing that you tend to frown upon people video taping your live shows and even calling them out from time to time, I was surprised to come across a weird Big Black VHS a few years back at a local "indie" video store in Michigan. It looked like you were playing in a really small bar on the floor and that there were maybe 10 people at the show. Also, there were really cheesy (probably innovative for the time) video wipes and dissolves inserted in between songs and some weird slow motion 8 bit effects added over songs.



That sounds like the Atavistic video. Atavistic made informal VHS releases for a couple of bands, Big Black, Pussy galore and maybe Swans. The Big Black one was shot at a great little place called No Bar in Muncie, Indiana, run by the former manager of the Dancing Cigarettes. It was a "legit" release, I suppose, but I haven't heard from Kurt, the guy that released it, in quite a while.

The reason we're not crazy about people videotaping our shows at present is that we want people involved directly in the show, not archiving it for later enjoyment at their desks. We want them involved now.


NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/10/07 07:56 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

How much money would it take for you to work on the next Fergie album?

SpleenLSD
(member)
07/10/07 09:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Well, putting my name on a Stooges record is a bit like mentioning their barbers. I'm proud of the association, I loved working on their record, and I'm thrilled to have spent time in their company, so I'm flattered that they mention me, but also a little embarrassed because they are so much more important than me.




How did Mike Watt operate during the sessions? Did you get the sense that Mike was a hired gun, an equal footing band member, or a role player?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 04:17 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I witnessed Shellac at ATP nightmare before christmas a few years back having taken a cocktail of shrooms, weed and ale. You sounded like Tontos Expanding Head Band. Was this intentional?



Other than in some weird kind of lasagna, I don't know how you could get all that in you without it being intentional.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 04:23 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

How much money would it take for you to work on the next Fergie album?



We discussed rates earlier.


whale_hunter
(member)
07/11/07 05:23 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I think Private Dancer is a great song. Do you see a problem with that?

FF_Woodycooks
(enthusiast)
07/11/07 06:26 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Since you're a Chicago guy and I was a big SP fan when I was younger.

A - Billy Corgan. Huge ahole right? Like tremendously? I always heard he was kind of reviled by the 'real underground' Chicago bands for being a sellout (which I think is BS, like they wouldn't sell out for millions if they had a chance). Also Pavement seemed to hate him, any stories about Billy?

B - What did you think of Siamese Dream. Even if you hate SP and/or Billy, you have to admit that album RAWKED and still does.


239
(journeyman)
07/11/07 10:35 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Thanks for taking the time to do this Q and A.

1) Do you need a cranked tube amp to get a good overdriven amp tone on to tape? Any tips for miking 1x12 combo amps, multiple mics?

2) What would your advice be for a 34 year old singer songwriter who just wants to get his music recorded for himself more than for release? Hire musicians and go to the cheapest studio possible? Try to do it at home?

3) It seems that a lot of "indie music" rejects pop type melodies, what is your take on music that's easy to listen to in that sense, too obvious to be good?

4) How about a trade. Help with my music for NLHE lessons?

5) Why and when did you stop taking drugs?

6) What do you think about multi-genre fusion shredders like Guthrie Govan?

7) What's your guitar rig (guitar, pedalboard, amps, etc)?

Thanks,

Chris


luau
(stranger)
07/11/07 12:23 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve, who is your favorite comedian?

Also, who has been the most unintentionally hilarious musician you've ever met (besides Urge Overkill)?


kepsey
(stranger)
07/11/07 12:57 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve,

Are you posturing for relevance on poker message boards now?

I love how critical you can be of other musicians. This from a guy who puts a record once every six years.

Why is the new Shellac record so half-assed?

If you want people involved in your shows now, how come you never tour?

Is it true David Yow thinks your a sword swallower?

Where do has-beens go to die?

Wank on,

Kepsey


felix240
(stranger)
07/11/07 01:27 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Is Kepsey a nom de pricque for Nash Kato?

The new Shellac rec. is (for my money) the best Albini release since "Two Nuns..."


kepsey
(stranger)
07/11/07 01:34 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Is that poker money or milk money?

You Mom wants to use the computer now.

Tom Jones is chiming in on a Mah-jong board...


JackWhite
(veteran)
07/11/07 01:39 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I know you are not a big Pumpkins fan, but what is your opinion on Billy bringing back the Pumpkins without D'arcy and James?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 02:10 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I think Private Dancer is a great song. Do you see a problem with that?



Do you ever get a song stuck in your head? It happens to most people. Some little ditty or the memorable part of a hit song or a carpet company jingle, you try to go to sleep and there it is, doot-doot-doo-ing away in the back of your mind. Super annoying.

Have you also noticed how the song "Private Dancer" by Tina Turner never ever gets stuck in your head, no matter how many times you've been forced to hear it? That's because "Private Dancer" is so formless and hideous that there isn't even enough of a tune there to get stuck.

"Private Dancer" is the absolute zenith of the art of 80s schlock. There's a sort of synthetic rhythm, and some schmeer of digital drama provided by the Yamaha DX7 keyboard, but no actual music. On top of it all, a creaking, tuneless yowl of a vocal, rattling up from the guts of a parchment-skinned old woman trying to sexy at you. Hideous.

So, "Private Dancer" makes the perfect palate-cleanser. Whenever you have a song stuck in your head, force yourself to mentally trudge through the song "Private Dancer," at least as much as you can remember. It also helps to imagine the video of a once-stunning, now-cartoonish Tina Turner, the last of the pain pills and red wine finally down her throat, heaving her clattering bones around the soundstage trying to sexy.

Run that through there for twenty seconds, and it's better than Drano. It clears-out whatever was stuck and leaves on its own, leaving no trace behind.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 03:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

A - Billy Corgan. Huge ahole right? Like tremendously?



I have had limited dealings with Billy Corgan, and everything I personally dealt with him on, he was totally reasonable and unpretentious. He was also very generous with his time in regards to some charity stuff he was asked to do, and I applaud him for that.

Many people have passed judgment on him based on some public statements and presumptions about how he managed the membership of his bands. Even a micro celebrity like myself is occasionally asked to make statements for public consumption, so I know that things said in haste or without consideration can come back to haunt you. Also, not having been in his bands, I'm not prepared to say what he should or shouldn't have done with the members, and who "counts" as a "real" band member.

Quote:

I always heard he was kind of reviled by the 'real underground' Chicago bands for being a sellout...



The first part is true, but not necessarily because of the second part. You are asking about historical perspectives, and I happened to be around while this was underway, so maybe I can shed some light.

In Chicago in the late 1980s, there began to develop a kind of budding professionalism that struck us in the punk/underground scene as distasteful: Bands with managers, publicists and other agents were encroaching on a self-made scene that had previously been by, for and about the bands themselves.

The Smashing Pumpkins personified this creeping professionalism, having a management relationship with a creepy local music business player who was also responsible for booking the biggest venue in town. As a result, any decent touring band that came through town would have the Smashing Pumpkins added to the bill as a support act. This was rightfully seen as an imposition, and patrons learned to arrive at the Metro an hour later than usual in order to miss them. It isn't overstating things to say they were something of a joke in Chicago -- a band imposed on an existing audience by the music business rather than a band building its natural audience through accretion.

Additionally, early on they were associated with the exceptional band the Poster Children, through some shows and a shared label. The Poster Children (and other bands from the same downstate scene, like Hum) were an obvious and direct influence on the Smashing Pumpkins' sound. For anyone familiar with both, it is hard to see how the a lesser derivation of the Poster Children's sound could be hailed as some kind of revolutionary genius, except by rock critics and music business people unaware of anything at the street level.

In some of those public statements I mentioned earlier, Billy Corgan has derided the underground scene of the day, saying it was clique-ish and insular, and that he wanted to rebel against it by going through conventional rock star channels to become a conventional rock star. Well, bully for that kind of thinking, I guess, if you think being a retrograde reactionary and joining the suffocating mainstream culture and business is some kind of rebellion, and if you think the penthouse of the managers and lawyers is somehow more open and inviting than the open field of the DIY scene.

For those of us involved daily in bucking that system, it was gross.

Quote:

(which I think is BS, like they wouldn't sell out for millions if they had a chance).



Especially considering who you're talking to right now, you ought to realize this is pure nonsense.

Quote:

B - What did you think of Siamese Dream. Even if you hate SP and/or Billy, you have to admit that album RAWKED and still does.



Not my cup of tea.


Cillian
(stranger)
07/11/07 03:58 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

do you think you will ever work with glen and the frames again?

what are your feelings on Mic Christopher


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/11/07 04:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

which I think is BS, like they wouldn't sell out for millions if they had a chance).



Especially considering who you're talking to right now, you ought to realize this is pure nonsense.





If your only goal was to sell records, how big of a rock star do you think you could have been? Billy Corgan big? Much bigger? Which rock star would you place as the upper bound on how famous you could have become?

I think this is what you ment by your statement, sorry if I got it wrong.


JackWhite
(veteran)
07/11/07 04:04 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve, you were featured in a few sound bites on VH-1's "Best 100 Bands in Hard Rock History" a few years ago. I assume you voted on this list? If so, do you mind sharing your list.

Georgia Avenue
(BBV Film Director)
07/11/07 04:59 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Thanks again for your service to our country!

I keep trying to needle you into saying something negative about modern music, especially hiphop. Is there any that you like?

You've mentioned some soul and R&B singers here, which I didnt find surprising, even though it seems out of character, (rockers are only supposed to like rock, DJs aren't supposed to listen to indiepop etc)...and this is awesome. But some might say that eclecticism can ruin a persons musical focus, especially as a youngster. Some of the best rock and rollers I've know personally have been totally ignorant of everything outside of their genre...is this just an accident of their obsession, or a necessity for them to be

Did you ever say something nice about a person's music just to (wait for it...) get in her pants? You once said that Liz Phair was the least terrible "alternative rock" act in Chicago...COINCIDENCE?

SOME POKER QUESTIONS:

Any poker ambitions (play in WSOP, higher stakes, etc)
Any poker heros? (Beside Andy B obv)
Ever played with any pros?
Future of poker predictions?


SOME LIFE QUESTIONS:

What would you tell a young stalwart man-boy who never seems to get it going with the ladies? Say he writes long dopey letters to chicks after they reject him on their first date? Is he hopeless? If not, should he get a hooker just to clear his mind, or should he just listen to his older and wiser friends and just keep going out and getting rejected until he isn't afraid of chicks? How can we get him to stop putting tha P on a pedestal?

what it do,
--GA


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 05:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1) Do you need a cranked tube amp to get a good overdriven amp tone on to tape? Any tips for miking 1x12 combo amps, multiple mics?



A good rule of thumb is that if you want the sound of a certain amplifier, then you ought to use that amplifier to record. Trying to fool Mother Nature is seldom a realistic goal. There isn't a single standard for what makes a good guitar sound -- it's all relative to the kind of music being played and the techniques in play. But if you aren't happy with the sound of your amplifier, you shouldn't record it and hope that some magic happens to make you like it on tape. If you are happy with the sound as-is, then you need to get better at capturing that sound, and that takes experience.

Quote:

2) What would your advice be for a 34 year old singer songwriter who just wants to get his music recorded for himself more than for release? Hire musicians and go to the cheapest studio possible? Try to do it at home?



Recording is a strange objective. I have always seen playing the music as the goal, and recording as a document of the playing. To that end, I would suggest trying to get a band together (even as a pastime) and get comfortable playing the songs. Recording it with this band should then be a pretty straightforward exercise, and you can certainly do it in the practice room. If you just want to make demos of the songs without putting a band together, then you'll either need to pay or cajole musicians into playing them, or you can do everything yourself as overdubs.

Quote:

3) It seems that a lot of "indie music" rejects pop type melodies, what is your take on music that's easy to listen to in that sense, too obvious to be good?



You are apparently ignorant of the enormous number of indie pop bands out there who strive for nothing more than obvious, memorable melodies. There are thousands of such bands. If you mean the ugly end of the spectrum, okay, there are people like me who have no taste for pop music, and don't pretend to understand it.

Quote:

4) How about a trade. Help with my music for NLHE lessons?



If you can beat the Tuesday Game, you can make enough in a couple of months to record your songs, and I'll get all the lesson I can handle in the process. Send me a PM.

Quote:

5) Why and when did you stop taking drugs?



In early 1981, when I realized that I didn't like being drunk or high, and that I turned into a real prick when I drank. Imagine that.

Quote:

6) What do you think about multi-genre fusion shredders like Guthrie Govan?



It shouldn't surprise you to know that I've never thought about Guthrie Govan, not once, not even now.

Quote:

7) What's your guitar rig (guitar, pedalboard, amps, etc)?



It's posted on guitargeek, and is pretty accurate. There is no external A/B box, but otherwise, they got it right.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 05:22 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Steve, who is your favorite comedian?



Well, John Novotny, of course.

But as for performing comics, probably Bill Hicks (who my girlfriend introduced me to) or Richard Pryor. Currently, Andy Kindler and Patton Oswalt.

Quote:

Also, who has been the most unintentionally hilarious musician you've ever met (besides Urge Overkill)?



Larry Damore. Spend an evening with him and you'll learn everything it takes to get through life as a guy from Chicago. Everything. Double smoothies, the bye-bye clown, how to grow weed in your mom's house, why not to toast marshmallows with a fork, what to do when you accidentally drop acid, how to answer the phone, what to do with a wrong number (and which tollway rest stop to do it at)...

A Goliath of Fun.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 05:42 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Are you posturing for relevance on poker message boards now?



Are you trawling the internet looking for places to hassle me?

Quote:

I love how critical you can be of other musicians. This from a guy who puts a record once every six years.



Thank you, I love it too. Glad you noticed our considered pace. Perhaps if everybody put out fewer records more of them would be worth listening to.

Quote:

Why is the new Shellac record so half-assed?



The rest of the ass is busy getting licked shiny by your ma.

Quote:

If you want people involved in your shows now, how come you never tour?



If by "never," you mean only a couple of times a year, then bite my crank, I guess.

Quote:

Is it true David Yow thinks your a sword swallower?



You could ask your ma. There's no telling what he'll blurt out when she sticks a couple fingers up his ass.

Quote:

Where do has-beens go to die?



Humboldt Park, Ukranian Village, Back of the Yards, Uptown, Pilsen or Bucktown. Anywhere you can afford, right guy?

Quote:

Wank on,



wank off, the Clapper.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 05:48 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

do you think you will ever work with glen and the frames again?



I hope so. They are a terrific band and fun people to hang around.

Quote:

what are your feelings on Mic Christopher



Tragic story. I didn't know him, but he was always remembered fondly by people who did know him.


mikebarr
(stranger)
07/11/07 06:21 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I get to use a decent studio with resonable microphones but the sound room is dead. Any tips on bringing the room alive besides standard stereo mic techniques?

FF_Woodycooks
(enthusiast)
07/11/07 06:22 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity



Quote:

Quote:

(which I think is BS, like they wouldn't sell out for millions if they had a chance).



Especially considering who you're talking to right now, you ought to realize this is pure nonsense.




So most underground bands would turn down a big record deal and national promotion so they can continue to work the local scene for free beer, and finally retire to a carpet cleaning business or whatnot? I mean you make a nice living, you have a skilled techincal profession, I am speaking more of band members that have nothing else to lean on. Does 'keeping it real' trump all?

Quote:

Quote:

B - What did you think of Siamese Dream. Even if you hate SP and/or Billy, you have to admit that album RAWKED and still does.



Not my cup of tea.




I imagined it wouldn't be, I thought you might appreciate it for the effort and talent that went into making such a dynamic, painstaking production - perhaps you disdain that though! :P


please.muck
(member)
07/11/07 06:53 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

http://tools.wikimedia.de/~gmaxwell/jorbis/JOrbisPlayer.php?path=Nancarrow40b.ogg&wiki=en

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 07:29 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

If your only goal was to sell records, how big of a rock star do you think you could have been? Billy Corgan big? Much bigger? Which rock star would you place as the upper bound on how famous you could have become?



You realize that I have worked on records that have sold many millions of copies, right? I've made a reasonable living for 20 years doing only things that I thought were within the bounds of my ethics. I'm not just guessing when I say it is possible to survive and flourish without "selling out." Along the way, I have been offered things that would have earned me literally millions of dollars, and I decided that my peace of mind was worth more than that, so I didn't do them.

The most obvious case is that I am paid a flat fee for my work as an engineer, rather than paid out of a band's royalty. This has directly benefited the bands I work with (and consequently cost me) several million dollars. Despite which, I have never gone hungry, built a nice business and been able to release records and tour the world pretty much at will. Not selling out hasn't hindered me in the slightest.

I mention this not to make note of any accomplishments of mine (a necessity, but one that took me several pages of discussion to relent to), but to show you that the world is not divided into rock stars on one hand and miserable bar bands on the other. There is a comfortable independent realm that is inhabited by thousands of bands like mine, and selling out is neither an objective or necessarily any real improvement in conditions for them.

There is an apocryphal story about Ahmet Ertegun approaching Ian MacKaye of Fugazi in an attempt to get him to sign with Atlantic. He says something like, "I can offer you your own label and a million dollars." To which Ian replies, "I already have my own label and a million dollars."

If you mean could I have been a rock star in the manner Billy Corgan, well no, probably not. I'm not a very good singer, I'm nothing special to look at, and the music I make doesn't appeal to a large audience.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 07:48 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Steve, you were featured in a few sound bites on VH-1's "Best 100 Bands in Hard Rock History" a few years ago. I assume you voted on this list? If so, do you mind sharing your list.



The band Cheap Trick were in our studio, and VH1 came in to film interviews with them. While they were here, they realized they could interview me too, so they asked me to comment on a few of the bands on Cheap Trick's list. I didn't get to make a list, but I may do so tonight for funsies.


JackWhite
(veteran)
07/11/07 08:12 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Steve, you were featured in a few sound bites on VH-1's "Best 100 Bands in Hard Rock History" a few years ago. I assume you voted on this list? If so, do you mind sharing your list.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


The band Cheap Trick were in our studio, and VH1 came in to film interviews with them. While they were here, they realized they could interview me too, so they asked me to comment on a few of the bands on Cheap Trick's list. I didn't get to make a list, but I may do so tonight for funsies.





That would be great. I had some major problems with their list, and I am guessing your list would be significantly different as well.


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/11/07 08:19 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

If your only goal was to sell records, how big of a rock star do you think you could have been? Billy Corgan big? Much bigger? Which rock star would you place as the upper bound on how famous you could have become?



You realize that I have worked on records that have sold many millions of copies, right? I've made a reasonable living for 20 years doing only things that I thought were within the bounds of my ethics. I'm not just guessing when I say it is possible to survive and flourish without "selling out." Along the way, I have been offered things that would have earned me literally millions of dollars, and I decided that my peace of mind was worth more than that, so I didn't do them.

The most obvious case is that I am paid a flat fee for my work as an engineer, rather than paid out of a band's royalty. This has directly benefited the bands I work with (and consequently cost me) several million dollars. Despite which, I have never gone hungry, built a nice business and been able to release records and tour the world pretty much at will. Not selling out hasn't hindered me in the slightest.

I mention this not to make note of any accomplishments of mine (a necessity, but one that took me several pages of discussion to relent to), but to show you that the world is not divided into rock stars on one hand and miserable bar bands on the other. There is a comfortable independent realm that is inhabited by thousands of bands like mine, and selling out is neither an objective or necessarily any real improvement in conditions for them.

There is an apocryphal story about Ahmet Ertegun approaching Ian MacKaye of Fugazi in an attempt to get him to sign with Atlantic. He says something like, "I can offer you your own label and a million dollars." To which Ian replies, "I already have my own label and a million dollars."

If you mean could I have been a rock star in the manner Billy Corgan, well no, probably not. I'm not a very good singer, I'm nothing special to look at, and the music I make doesn't appeal to a large audience.





Hmmm, Ok. I was just refering to this statement that you made

Quote:

Quote:

which I think is BS, like they wouldn't sell out for millions if they had a chance).



Especially considering who you're talking to right now, you ought to realize this is pure nonsense.





I thought your were implying that you were given the opportunity to "sell out" and you chose not to. I am pretty familiar with your career, though I first heard of you as "the dude Kurt Cobain got to record his last album."
I only discovered your bands' music much later, when I was in college.

I didn't mean to imply that you have not had a good career in music or that you are nothing since you might not be considered a "rock star" or whatever.

You answered my question in the last paragraph. Thanks!


And if you are still with me, you said that taking a flat fee helped the bands you worked with. Did it benefit them in anyway besides the obvious monetary one for bands that sell alot of albums?

Also, I believe you charge bands like Bush and Nirvana more than if I or some other random dudes wanted to record with you. Why do you think this is ethical? (I am not criticisizing you here, I know you have been very vocal on this issue [wrt to royalties] and I want to understand your view better.) Thanks again for a great thread!!!!


sponge
(stranger)
07/11/07 08:42 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve, right now I'm sitting in Lakeview reading your little Q&A here, wondering why we're not just hanging out anyway.

My question is this: I grew up on a farm in Iowa in the late 90's. My only CD outlet was Wal-Mart and the Pumpkins were the only band I cared about till I moved away to college. I still think their early stuff is undeniable. Is there any hope for me?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 08:48 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Also, I believe you charge bands like Bush and Nirvana more than if I or some other random dudes wanted to record with you. Why do you think this is ethical?



Big label sessions demand more administrative attention, take more time to organize in advance, and are often open-ended, in that I may find myself working much longer than anticipated on such a session, and most importantly, it is bastard hard to get a major label to pay its bills, and I want to be compensated for that nuisance. I have to cover the cost of lost work, often there is travel and associated living costs, sometimes I even need to hire someone temporarily either to cover my ass back home or keep up with the session I'm on. Additionally, big label sessions often have some prick demanding changes and revisions long-distance, and that is much more time consuming than working with just the band in the studio.

Working on big label projects can be a royal pain in the ass and cost money to execute. I want all that covered, and I want to make a profit, so I charge them more. Still, I charge them less than most people in my position, and I am undeniably a bargain.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 09:27 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hmmm, Ok. I was just refering to this statement that you made

Quote:

Quote:

which I think is BS, like they wouldn't sell out for millions if they had a chance).



Especially considering who you're talking to right now, you ought to realize this is pure nonsense.





I thought your were implying that you were given the opportunity to "sell out" and you chose not to.



Hmmm, Ok. That's just exactly, precisely what I was saying, not implying.

Lots of people, given the option of selling out their principles for millions choose not to. I happen to be one of them.


FF_Woodycooks
(enthusiast)
07/11/07 10:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Yes but its because you already have money/millions and are happy. If you're working for 8 dollars an hour doing labor, and playing for free beer and a few bucks at night, staying true to principles isn't as easy.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 10:07 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

So most underground bands would turn down a big record deal and national promotion so they can continue to work the local scene for free beer, and finally retire to a carpet cleaning business or whatnot?



So much you do not understand. So many words it will take to teach you. Okay.

I don't suggest that most bands would turn down big deals. Most would take them and be worse off eventually. Luckily, most bands are not offered deals, and so don't have to make such choices, and the question is therefore moot.

Of those bands who are offered deals with big record labels, many of them (not a majority, but enough to prove my point) are already comfortable on independent labels that serve them well, and they see no need to move to a more bureaucratic situation that works less efficiently and cares less about them specifically. Not all bands think this way, but quite a few (especially those who have been paying attention and can do their own math) do.

National and even international promotion and touring is available to bands of no stature and no resources through the extremely efficient fan-and-band network that has supplanted the mainstream outlets for independent bands.

If you're talking about payola, okay, that single example of the incredibly inefficient music business is only available to big label acts. Whoop de doo. If you're not satisfied with selling records and concert tickets, and getting played on enthusiastic independent/college/internet/satellite stations, but also insist on getting played on am and morning zoo fm radio, then you have no choice.

Independent bands tour the world and play in front of crowds in the many thousands. To suggest that they will be playing "Proud Mary" in local taverns forever is to display utter ignorance of the music economy. Some of these bands can command fees better than $10,000 a night, and a few can get a multiple of that. Hardly beer money.

As for the carpet-cleaning business, where do you think major-label artists end-up once their advance has been spent? In the palaces of the old rock star gated retirement community?

No, they end up getting jobs, just like everybody else. Where's the shame in embracing that reality instead of deluding yourself about it?

Quote:

I mean you make a nice living, you have a skilled techincal profession, I am speaking more of band members that have nothing else to lean on. Does 'keeping it real' trump all?



If you will starve unless you become a rock star, then you have bigger problems than whether or not you are a rock star.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/11/07 10:13 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Yes but its because you already have money/millions and are happy.



Do you think I dropped into the world that way? Do you think I did not have my share of $8 an hour jobs? I am older than you, probably, so the figure was more like $5, but you get the idea.

Would you believe me if I told you that not compromising my principles is what got me whatever money and success I have enjoyed in excess of that $5 an hour?

If not, I'm sorry, but you will never understand. If you believe me, then the rest of your curiosity should satisfy itself, QED.


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/11/07 10:27 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


As for the carpet-cleaning business, where do you think major-label artists end-up once their advance has been spent? In the palaces of the old rock star gated retirement community?




Can you estimate what percentage of bands that sign major deals regret it? I read that article a while back where you keep track of a bands finances after they sign and it was pretty interesting. I think I used to assume that you sign a deal and you wake up the next day and you're Creed or somthing


sponge
(stranger)
07/11/07 10:28 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do you ever go to Discus CD Exchange on Broadway? I just rented a DVD for 50 cents; best deal in town.

realsquid
(stranger)
07/11/07 10:31 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

After you worked on 'Gub', I remember reading some disparaging remarks between you and Trent Reznor. A few years later, you worked on one of his albums. Did the two of you end up getting along better, or was it just business?

Also, what are your thoughts about King Buzzo and the Melvins?


Gummy
(stranger)
07/12/07 12:43 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,
I am a Shitape (as proven by my one post), but I love reading your opinions on recording. Thanks for doing this. I can't believe you put up with so much [censored] every time you try and do something like this. I opened a small studio about three years ago and share a lot of your opinions about recording. Do you feel that a studio starting now can make it without catering to the fix it in the mix/edit mind set? Oh, and thank you for your work with Jesus Lizard.


pronography
(stranger)
07/12/07 01:18 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

First I just want to say I think it's amazing that you're doing this. I'm a new engineer and you're by far one of my biggest influences. Anyway, I went through about 20 or so pages and didn't see this question asked so I figured I'd give it a shot...

To make it short and simple, what are/were your thoughts on Peter Sotos? I read that he lived with you around the time of his trial and while I find his books to contain some of the most visceral writings since De Sade, I'm much more fascinated with the man behind the writings and recordings.


Transmission3000
(stranger)
07/12/07 01:59 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

First off, thanks for recording the last few Neurosis records. It's always nice to have my mind blown out like that, every couple of years.

Now...to a couple questions:

Where does Powerage rank, as far as your favorite AC/DC records go?

What's the worst hand that you've won the most money on (in a game with other serious players, that is)?

Have you heard that Grinderman record? If so, what do you think of it?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/12/07 03:03 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

To make it short and simple, what are/were your thoughts on Peter Sotos? I read that he lived with you around the time of his trial and while I find his books to contain some of the most visceral writings since De Sade, I'm much more fascinated with the man behind the writings and recordings.



He is a terrific writer and a genuinely good guy. It's hard to explain to someone unfamiliar with his writing, but he can effectively evoke feelings that one is uncomfortable entertaining. His writing is the most intellectually and emotionally honest of anybody I can think of. I admire the brutish simplicity, the conversational tone of the invective and the comfortable familiarity with the people and situations in his narratives.

His subject matter can be hard to handle, but if you have (or develop) the stomach for it, the writing is superb and it can reward parts of your intellect you didn't know you had. His records, similarly, can give you the capital-letter creeps. The unique element of his art is that he's not affecting anything. None of it is for show. Every sentiment is utterly genuine, and expressed in a way that will bring you into that frame of mind with no sleight of hand. Creating a compelling body of work with such hard-boiled artlessness and lack of poetry is unique in literature.

Peter never lived with me, and I don't get to see him as often as I like, but I consider him a genius and great friend, and I would go to some lengths for him if needed.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/12/07 03:37 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Where does Powerage rank, as far as your favorite AC/DC records go?



1/2 Back in Black (best songs, best ass-kickingness)
1/2 Highway to Hell (best singing)
3 Powerage

Quote:

What's the worst hand that you've won the most money on (in a game with other serious players, that is)?



There's a sort of competition in the Tuesday Game to see who can book the biggest win starting with J4 off-suit, a pet hand we have nicknamed the Buzzsaw. It gets played ridiculously fast, as this example will show:
Quote:

You like apples?

Full Tilt Poker
No Limit Holdem Ring game
Blinds: $1/$2
8 players
Converter

Stack sizes:
UTG: $371
UTG+1: $53.65
MP1: $116.40
MP2: $220.35
CO: $73.35
Button: $417.40
buzzsaw!: $233.85
BB: $195

Pre-flop: (8 players) buzzsaw! is SB with 4 j
3 folds, MP2 raises to $7, 2 folds, buzzsaw! calls, BB folds.

Flop: 2 2 4 ($16, 2 players)
buzzsaw! checks, MP2 bets $10, buzzsaw! raises to $35, MP2 calls.

Turn: 4 ($86, 2 players)
buzzsaw! bets $178.35, MP2 calls all-in $178.35.

River: 6 ($442.7, 1 player + 1 all-in - Main pot: $442.7)


Results:
Final pot: $442.7
MP2 showed Qh Qc
buzzsaw! showed 4h Jc

How about them apples?




Or this one from the limit division:
Quote:


Full Tilt Poker
Limit Holdem Ring game
Limit: $1/$2
6 players
Converter

Pre-flop: (6 players) Hero is Button with 4 j
UTG+1 calls, CO folds, Hero raises, SB folds, BB 3-bets, UTG folds, UTG+1 calls, Hero caps, BB calls, UTG+1 calls.

Flop: 6 5 j
BB bets, UTG+1 folds, Hero raises, BB calls.

Turn: 6
BB checks, Hero bets, BB calls.

River: q
BB checks, Hero bets, BB calls.





Quote:

Have you heard that Grinderman record? If so, what do you think of it?



Have not heard it, but the lineup looks pretty good.


Hate Truck
(stranger)
07/12/07 03:39 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What has been your relationship with Jim O'rourke? It seems like since you both work as engineers in Chicago with some of the same artists, and possibly share some personal friends, that you've probably bumped elbows once or twice. Also, how do you feel that he was touted by the press as the "producer" on Joanna Newsom's last record?

Also, if you would be so kind, could you listen to a few seconds of my band and offer a brief critique? If you don't want this thread to go down that road, I totally understand. But I would very much like to hear what you think. Whatever you say about us, we will post on our page, unedited, accredited to you. http://myspace.com/hatetruck


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/12/07 04:22 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What has been your relationship with Jim O'rourke?



Jim is a good guy, excellent musician and has worked on a bunch of great records. He is more of a producer than engineer, but he gets great results from some sometimes temperamental artists, so more power to him.

Jim hasn't lived in Chicago for a while, and has said some unflattering things about the music scene here, but I have not noticed anybody harboring a reciprocal grudge against him, and he is still generally appreciated and welcomed here.

Quote:

how do you feel that he was touted by the press as the "producer" on Joanna Newsom's last record?



I don't much care about credits. I'm just glad Joanna likes it, and I got to work on it.

Quote:

Also, if you would be so kind, could you listen to a few seconds of my band and offer a brief critique? If you don't want this thread to go down that road, I totally understand.



Then you totally understand.

Quote:

Whatever you say about us, we will post on our page, unedited, accredited to you.



This pretty much guarantees that I won't be listening to and commenting on your music.


filliamhmuffman
(stranger)
07/12/07 04:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Any details on the In On the Kill Taker sessions? Was the band just not with it then or what exactly caused things to not work out. Would seem like a great combo.

vntr
(stranger)
07/12/07 05:36 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve,
I'm 5 years late, sorry for that....I always wanted to personnaly thank you for probably one of the best week end of my life, which is when Todd, Bob and you curated ATP in 2002.
That week end made love rock music even more than before and I was proud to be part of a specific community, which is actually a word that I don't really like.
I discovered new bands like PW Long and Stinking Lizaveta.
I felt the luckiest bastard on earth to see bands that I adore like Silkworm,Arcwelder,Shipping News,Wire,etc...I can go on and on.
So as I said, I'm 5 years late, but thank you sooooo much Steve, Todd and Bob!!!

I'll think of a question later.

diego


ruralfaune
(stranger)
07/12/07 07:15 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

hey Steve

Do you remember Le Vénéré club ?? ( special question i know for the veterans we are)

if you want more details, tell me


luau
(stranger)
07/12/07 08:16 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I am fan of some Tim Kinsella and his music (Joan Of Arc, Owls, Make Believe) but there is also a fair chunk of crap he has released under various monikers. If anything I think he needs a bit of self-editing at times. What has your experience been working with Tim Kinsella? While a lot publications seem to take joy in taking him down a peg each time a record comes out, how is he perceived within the Chi-town community?

Also, thank you for taking Jessica Hopper down a notch. I'm glad I'm not the only one who has found her "journalism" to be third-rate and alarmist at best.

Please bring Shellac to Montreal and show us how it's done.


yop
(stranger)
07/12/07 08:17 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve,
I have been lurking this forum for a couple of months and this excellent thread made me want to register...
Here are my questions :

Can you tell grossly, how much an artist/band makes for each album sold :
- from a major
- from a fake indie label owned by a major
- from a big indie label
- from an obscure label
- directly from the band/label website
- during a live show

Did you bang Mia from Electrelane during the recording sessions (or at least tried to)?

Did you know that there was a small french "post/free rock" band named "Enregistré par Steve Albini" (recorded by...) ?
I don't know if it's a tribute or a sarcastic name to mock an albini-hype but anyway this must prove you are now in the rock n roll hall of fame, and I guess it must be very strange to have a band named after yourself...
If you are curious you can hear what they are doing here : http://stevealbini.free.fr/

Thx & sorry for the possible english mistakes in my post,
Yop


kepsey
(stranger)
07/12/07 09:02 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

"Thank you, I love it too. Glad you noticed our considered pace. Perhaps if everybody put out fewer records more of them would be worth listening to."

Only if your the one clicking the mouse, Stevo. $600? You sister doesn't even charge that much...


Georgia Avenue
(BBV Film Director)
07/12/07 10:10 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Thanks again for your service to our country!

I keep trying to needle you into saying something negative about modern music, especially hiphop. Is there any that you like?

You've mentioned some soul and R&B singers here, which I didnt find surprising, even though it seems out of character, (rockers are only supposed to like rock, DJs aren't supposed to listen to indiepop etc)...and this is awesome. But some might say that eclecticism can ruin a persons musical focus, especially as a youngster. Some of the best rock and rollers I've know personally have been totally ignorant of everything outside of their genre...is this just an accident of their obsession, or a necessity for them to be

Did you ever say something nice about a person's music just to (wait for it...) get in her pants? You once said that Liz Phair was the least terrible "alternative rock" act in Chicago...COINCIDENCE?

SOME POKER QUESTIONS:

Any poker ambitions (play in WSOP, higher stakes, etc)
Any poker heros? (Beside Andy B obv)
Ever played with any pros?
Future of poker predictions?


SOME LIFE QUESTIONS:

What would you tell a young stalwart man-boy who never seems to get it going with the ladies? Say he writes long dopey letters to chicks after they reject him on their first date? Is he hopeless? If not, should he get a hooker just to clear his mind, or should he just listen to his older and wiser friends and just keep going out and getting rejected until he isn't afraid of chicks? How can we get him to stop putting tha P on a pedestal?

what it do,
--GA




Is it because I asked to many questions or because someone told you I kissed a gay guy once on the lips? That was a vicious rumor anyway.

J4x... isn't that the Naked Larry?


dudeabides
(stranger)
07/12/07 10:16 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What was up with the booing Shellac received at the Stooges show? Aside from T&G emailing me about your opening slot (and then not posting it on your tour page) there was next to zero notice given about Shellac playing that show. Was that on purpose?

I hate to use a broad brush but that crowd had a serious "goon" element which is part of why most people didn't know who the hell you guys were.

Something tells me the band took some pleasure in the confrontational aspect.


Transmission3000
(stranger)
07/12/07 10:53 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What was up with the booing Shellac received at the Stooges show? Aside from T&G emailing me about your opening slot (and then not posting it on your tour page) there was next to zero notice given about Shellac playing that show. Was that on purpose?

I hate to use a broad brush but that crowd had a serious "goon" element which is part of why most people didn't know who the hell you guys were.

Something tells me the band took some pleasure in the confrontational aspect.



I was at that show. One of the most fun shows I've ever witnessed. Spit and pumpkin flying everywhere, from what I can recall.


felix240
(stranger)
07/12/07 01:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

This begs the question: WHY are you playing music? If you're doing it cause you think it should or will lead to fame/sex/riches then I think you should buy a lottery ticket, or get an MBA, and you'll have a better chance of achieving those ends.

However, if you're playing music cause you enjoy playing it, and have some thing (more or less) to say musically then getting beer is perfectly acceptable recompense. The amount or type of compensation you receive should have no bearing on your ability to adhere to personal ethical and aesthetic principles.

Making the music is the end in itself, not a means to some other reward.

What's more, many artists and musicians actually hold down "real" jobs in order support their creative habit. Rather than viewing this as a failure (if you don't get paid, it ain't worth doing) one might read this a sign of dedication to the creative work for its own sake.


roto13
(stranger)
07/12/07 01:29 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Two questions:

You play a Travis Bean and have recommended the Electrical Guitar line of instruments -- never having played either, what are the benefits (sonic and otherwise) of an aluminum neck guitar?

Quote:

most importantly, it is bastard hard to get a major label to pay its bills



To what do you attribute this? Bureaucracy/incompetence or do they hope you'll give up and they'll get to keep the money?


Transmission3000
(stranger)
07/12/07 01:34 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Where does Powerage rank, as far as your favorite AC/DC records go?



1/2 Back in Black (best songs, best ass-kickingness)
1/2 Highway to Hell (best singing)
3 Powerage



Over the years Powerage has edged out Highway to Hell, on my list. Back in Black...I dunno. I can really get behind some of the songs on there, but Brian Johnson's voice just grates on my nerves and stands in the way of the songcraft, in my opinion.

More questions:
When's the next Shellac and Fugazi weekend at The Congress? It's a shame Fugazi hasn't really played any music together for the past few years.

What are your vices, beyond poker?

Have you heard much Qui? I've only heard a couple songs, plus some YouTube clips. Pretty interesting, thus far.


peyoteugly
(stranger)
07/12/07 01:59 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

my god, there are some serious troglodytes on this board.
this F.F. Woodycooks fellow seems to have his head buried so far up his poop chute he can't tell up from down.
thank you, steve, for spelling it out for him. why is it so hard to believe that some people won't do anything for money?
also, seriously, dish about 18th Dye.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/12/07 03:05 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Here's what will get nowhere with me:

1) Music fan dorks signing up with new accounts and disparaging regular participants in this forum. They are here and contributing on a regular basis, and you are a guest. If a guest is an ass, he will either be ignored or insulted.

2) Asking me here (or in private messages) to go to your web page or Myspace page and listen to your music. I have made it clear that I do not care what kind of music you (any of you) make. If it interests me, I will discover it on my own, and if it doesn't, it would not prevent me from working on such a record if asked to. If I happen to like your band's music, there isn't anything I can do to help further your career anyway, so my liking it or not is of no importance.

3) Asking questions that are simple to ask but impossibly complex to answer completely, e.g. "How do I make my recordings sound good," "What should I do to improve my home studio," "What do you think of [x] kind of music," "Tell me some good stories."

That is all.


please.muck
(member)
07/12/07 03:32 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

u read sound on sound or any of those other mags?

Brian Wallace
(stranger)
07/12/07 03:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity


Books may seem like antiques in the age of the iphone but would you ever consider writing a book containing some of your knowledge regarding recording techniques?

Thank you,

Brian Wallace


FF_Woodycooks
(enthusiast)
07/12/07 04:01 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

This begs the question: WHY are you playing music? If you're doing it cause you think it should or will lead to fame/sex/riches then I think you should buy a lottery ticket, or get an MBA, and you'll have a better chance of achieving those ends.

However, if you're playing music cause you enjoy playing it, and have some thing (more or less) to say musically then getting beer is perfectly acceptable recompense. The amount or type of compensation you receive should have no bearing on your ability to adhere to personal ethical and aesthetic principles.

Making the music is the end in itself, not a means to some other reward.

What's more, many artists and musicians actually hold down "real" jobs in order support their creative habit. Rather than viewing this as a failure (if you don't get paid, it ain't worth doing) one might read this a sign of dedication to the creative work for its own sake.





Hi, I was more just making an argument to understand why bands like SP are reviled as 'sellouts' just because they were good enough and good at the game, and didn't mind making a nice living. I am totally fine and understand just doin it for fun and enjoyment, I don't think those are the people that take it seriously enough to produce something fantastic that reaches a ton of people. Is it wrong to seek commercial success if you think you're good enough and palatable enough for broad consumption?


glittercop666
(stranger)
07/12/07 04:17 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

jesus chirst steve give it a rest. word on the street is u recorded kurt and his band for free. [censored] i gotta tell ya, my brain is a little fuzzy but i remember the poster children recording up there at smart studio after gish and after we mixed the 1st catherine record there, and hum, that song about outter space and the wacky gurl... i liked it a lot. [censored] we used open for them, and the pumpkins and the flaming lips, and lush. Steve i was at everyone of those metro shows u talking about and i remember it different.... so, you were on one side of the tracks and then there was the wax trax i liked playing on the tracks. fun, just don't piss on the third rail. hey man, music is music and we all gotta pay rent. p.s. i'm working on a side project. u gotta hear it. i send u a copy. bye 4 now
kerry


sponge
(stranger)
07/12/07 04:25 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

How do you reconcile the differing opinions of someone from within the "scene" and someone far removed from it. For example, as a teenager in a tiny, tiny farm town I loved the Pumpkins. Their management situation and their professionalism would've meant absolutely nothing to me. I've heard something about Paul McCartney dictating the Abbey Road sessions but I didn't know or care anything about that when I was spinning You Never Give Me Your Money over and over.

At some point, won't the music be so far removed from its origins that it can be judged on its own merits?


felix240
(stranger)
07/12/07 04:48 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Yeah, I mean there's no guarantee of quality on either side of the major/indie divide, but I think someone following their own muse rather than aping the current top o the charts has a better shot at producing something of lasting value and depth. Similarly, just cause a lot of people bought the Smashing Pumpkins records in their prime doesn't mean those records are necessarily "better music" or that they even speak to the masses as music - people buy [censored] for a lot of reasons besides the actual use value or quality of the thing they bought. This is especially true with cultural stuff, cause we have been trained to think we are what we choose to own. "Taste" is I think more complicated and less personal then it might seem. Marketing and image for the Smashing Pumpkins is a huge part of how they sold what they sold.

That said, I like a lot of Gish.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/12/07 05:01 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hi, I was more just making an argument to understand why bands like SP are reviled as 'sellouts'...



And I tried to explain (in a couple hundred words you chose to ignore) that selling out has nothing to do with success, and is not why people disliked the Smashing Pumpkins in the first place.

Quote:

just because they were good enough and good at the game, and didn't mind making a nice living.



It is a ridiculous straw man (and a common one among apologists for mainstream culture) that independent-minded people are against success, and that we see something inherently wrong with making money, being well-liked, etc. I will say it again here (and for the 10,000th time in my life in identical discussions with people who are misrepresenting this position):

Nobody thinks success is a bad thing, nobody thinks less of a band just because they are successful, and nobody faults a band for wanting to make money. All of those things are embraced by the independent/underground culture. My band is reasonably popular. My bands have all turned a healthy profit. My bands' tours are all profitable. My bands have all sold a lot of records. I am glad it is so, and I have never wished that it was otherwise.

What is rejected is the bulldozer of corporate intrusion, the enforced group-think of the mass culture and the herd-of-sheep mentality that makes it possible. When someone embraces all those things, we are within our rights to notice and form an opinion of that embrace, and the person performing it.

I cannot say it any more clearly: Nobody has a problem with success. We have a problem with an oppressive, monolithic culture being thrust on us at every juncture, and those who would help it along using the excuse that they "just want to be successful."

Quote:

I am totally fine and understand just doin it for fun and enjoyment, I don't think those are the people that take it seriously enough to produce something fantastic that reaches a ton of people.




You are apparently ignorant of the careers of the many independent bands who have made "fantastic" records that have changed lives. How many people is a "ton?" Is a million enough? I can name you a dozen independent bands who have reached that many people and more.

Quote:

Is it wrong to seek commercial success if you think you're good enough and palatable enough for broad consumption?



The way you pose the question makes the answer obvious: No, of course not. That's also not what anybody is complaining about. "Seeking success" can be done without joining forces with the most destructive elements of the business and culture, and that's what you're excusing by reducing the discussion to a simpleton's level; "they just want to be successful." This is in keeping with the way the outfit excuses torching a restaurant and threatening the family of the proprietor, "it's just business."


episkeptis
(stranger)
07/12/07 05:24 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Which are your favourite non strategy poker books?


Which would get more tiresome if you had to do it every day for a year playing poker or playing gigs with Shellac?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/12/07 05:26 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

At some point, won't the music be so far removed from its origins that it can be judged on its own merits?



Music is more than sound. The sound is just the part that you can hear that gets you thinking, and what you think about is the music.

Everything I think about when triggered by the sound is music to me, and when I hear certain music, I love everything about it. The sound is the window into what I love, but why I love it is probably unique to each piece of music.

Also, for "love," read "hate" and "don't give half a damn about."

It is impossible for music to be evaluated on "its own merits," because on its own, it's just sound stripped of its intent. If, when you listen to music, you just hear sound, I pity you.


woozer
(stranger)
07/12/07 05:36 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve,

is it true that you hate touring Germany?
If so, why? If not, how come you´re here so rarely? And: Would you consider coming anyway (please!)?


sponge
(stranger)
07/12/07 05:45 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

At some point, won't the music be so far removed from its origins that it can be judged on its own merits?



Everything I think about when triggered by the sound is music to me, and when I hear certain music, I love everything about it. The sound is the window into what I love, but why I love it is probably unique to each piece of music.

Also, for "love," read "hate" and "don't give half a damn about."

It is impossible for music to be evaluated on "its own merits," because on its own, it's just sound stripped of its intent. If, when you listen to music, you just hear sound, I pity you.




Oh no, please don't pity me, I didn't say or imply that all I heard was sound. I said that at some point music will exist far apart from the scene it originated from. Managers and contracts and even recording techniques won't matter when the sound triggers the personal feelings and ignites, as you said: "everything I think about." Considering all those other things is just a form of politics isn't it?


Hanys
(stranger)
07/12/07 05:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I read through all the 40 pages of questions, answers and samples of the whoever-registered-for-the-sole-purpose-of-wanting-to-ask-themicrocelebrity-a-question-is-a-dork forumserver.twoplustwo.com sort-of-like elitist underground ethics. Whoever initially exposed this forum to the outter internet world, they sure were not a "stranger", right? Some sickly ambitious PR, maybe.

So, while some of the questions asked by 'the strangers' might've been a bit dull, and many of the questioners could've found their way here not exactly by the map painted on five cards, the music dorks still help give some of the true members that shortly oblivious feeling of importance and.. The witty one will know. Hey, Stevie, congrats on, how many years of dryness? 26? Well then.. I'm only into yer shtik.


longfellow
(stranger)
07/12/07 07:22 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

do you recall a band you recorded from fort collins, CO called tanger? your thoughts on them?

ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/12/07 07:24 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

the music dorks still help give some of the true members that shortly oblivious feeling of importance and.. The witty one will know.




Are you saying that you, a complete nobody, has made the regulars here feel more important just because you signed up?

If so, now that your work is done and we supposedly feel more important, can you all leave?


Hanys
(stranger)
07/12/07 08:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Um.. Not really. What I'm saying is that a better way to utilize your gift of being able to analyse very complicated concepts is to get into economy. In such field, you could actually cause some damage.

BlackNipples
(stranger)
07/12/07 08:55 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey! Steve! Is me, Devin. CIAO STEVE ALBINI! Is first time post with new handle! Because old time handle, handle DevinDixon, I forget her password! Also have new e-mail address! Also, never post much anyway. So sorry, twoplustwo gamboolers for whom I respect and fear at poker tables and casino buffets! You are some interneters and poker players!

Also, Steve! My great friend! So generous with time and knowledge of all things music and electrical! So nice to do for some internetters and one time nerds who only come by for the insult or to solicit attention to band! So nice to do! And to use bully pulpit and nerd-influence to spread the Good News of the Tuesday Game! So great! Grazie, Steve!

Now, Steve, a few things:

1. Am so pleased to be thought of as maybe a "country mile" best in the NLHE. So nice! But: You wrong. I don't think anybody at game is "country-mile" better than anybody else. Even Scott, who travel so fast and far down Donky Road, occasionally emerges on the other side of Planet Pokers looking like Greg Raymer. Sean, who you say, has you "clocked", has me pretty much on my heels too! Also every other player on Tuesday! He is pretty good player with his crapassing and big-bets and game-theory-perfect bluffing frequency!

2. That one guy who come to game, that 2+2 guy, he's pretty good! And pretty nice guy! This is bad! What if he come back? And then to keep coming back? Then, maybe I actually have to stay sober for game and think about poker and the implied pot-odds, and value-bets, and, well, poker! Mama mia!

3. When you gonna grow another moustache?

4. Am I fat? Please explain in strangely arousing Turkish accent.

5. Why I type like this?

Okay! Is all? Tuesday Hooray!


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/12/07 09:12 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Um.. Not really. What I'm saying is that a better way to utilize your gift of being able to analyse very complicated concepts is to get into economy. In such field, you could actually cause some damage.




tl;dr


soxfan1
(stranger)
07/12/07 10:15 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,
can you please explain the hey ni**er ep ? I obviosuly know your not a racist , thats not what i am getting at.


whale_hunter
(member)
07/12/07 10:20 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hey! Steve! Is me, Devin. CIAO STEVE ALBINI! Is first time post with new handle! Because old time handle, handle DevinDixon, I forget her password! Also have new e-mail address! Also, never post much anyway. So sorry, twoplustwo gamboolers for whom I respect and fear at poker tables and casino buffets! You are some interneters and poker players!

Also, Steve! My great friend! So generous with time and knowledge of all things music and electrical! So nice to do for some internetters and one time nerds who only come by for the insult or to solicit attention to band! So nice to do! And to use bully pulpit and nerd-influence to spread the Good News of the Tuesday Game! So great! Grazie, Steve!

Now, Steve, a few things:

1. Am so pleased to be thought of as maybe a "country mile" best in the NLHE. So nice! But: You wrong. I don't think anybody at game is "country-mile" better than anybody else. Even Scott, who travel so fast and far down Donky Road, occasionally emerges on the other side of Planet Pokers looking like Greg Raymer. Sean, who you say, has you "clocked", has me pretty much on my heels too! Also every other player on Tuesday! He is pretty good player with his crapassing and big-bets and game-theory-perfect bluffing frequency!

2. That one guy who come to game, that 2+2 guy, he's pretty good! And pretty nice guy! This is bad! What if he come back? And then to keep coming back? Then, maybe I actually have to stay sober for game and think about poker and the implied pot-odds, and value-bets, and, well, poker! Mama mia!

3. When you gonna grow another moustache?

4. Am I fat? Please explain in strangely arousing Turkish accent.

5. Why I type like this?

Okay! Is all? Tuesday Hooray!




Devin, tis me Scott. The one whom you beat with set over top two. You shouldnt be afriad of me coming back, you should be offering to pay my gas.

I was doing just fine till you showed up with stories of little dancing Jon benet Ramsey's, then took my money.

Bastard!!!


Hanys
(stranger)
07/12/07 10:39 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hello Big Blacknipples! I love poker! But I hate big nipples! And I especially despise the black ones! I hate sour milk! And you know that the dead ones always give a suck!

I wanted to talk to someone famoues!! Tonight! And then i found them! Tonight! Stevie! The page said he was here, replying the questions about music! So I came! Here! Tonight! I said to myself "who the hell is Stevie?!" And then I knew! I love music! And poker, too!! And "Steve Albini" was written on the back of the Surfer Rosa album! Right beneath that recorded by! You know, that brutally honestly modest one! And then I thought to myself "is he even famous enough? What else did he only record?" And then I knew! Bush! But was that famous enough? What else did he record? Well.. Well, whatever.. Nevermind! So I came anyway! Micro celebrity it said! I like even nano celebrities! I like even HIV!

First pages very ok! In a forum about music! But then, Stevie a [censored]! But that's ok, Stevie not [censored], Stevie pretending to be like everybody else! Good Stevie! Then poker players complaining about purely music fans asking Stevie! Stevie complaining too! It's about music! So what?! Stevie a hypocrite! Nice of Stevie! Stevie got poker friends! They play poker! This not about music! This about poker!

I wish I could play poker with Stevie and his donkeys! But donkeys bad! Donkeys could point at me and tell Stevie "see that guy? might be a closet music fan!"

And Stevie might drink a beer! And smoke a bowl! And sniff a coke! And do an acid! And, god almighty, smell a bit of brown! And then, Stevie could, after those long 26 years, all of a sudden start to act like a prick and make a decent record he would only record as well! Me not likey!! Me not at the poker game! Me not asking about music! Me not talking to famous people! Me only listening to highly famous people! Me left! Me right! Right?!


matt0009
(stranger)
07/13/07 12:40 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hello Steve.

In a Joanna Newsom article from the January issue of Performer magazine it states:

'...She went and recorded with Steve Albini, famed producer of neo-folk geniuses Jawbreaker and Cheap Trick. Well, he has also with Newsom's tourmate Smog. "I had always heard that Steve Albini was the best at accurately recording acoustic instruments and making them sound like exactly what they are," she explains. He helped her create the "rough and stark and exposed and grounded" sound she says she was looking for - and invented some unorthodox ways of micing the harp, which shall henceforth remain a mystery. "I don't think I should talk about them because I kind of feel like they're his intellectual property," she says.'

Now speaking to the man himself, is this mystery technique something you'd be willing to expand upon a little bit? Does it involve a multitude of intricately arranged microphones or something along those lines?

Thanks.


SaulPaul
(member)
07/13/07 02:27 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

do you find Jimmy Carr funny?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb87oedXV-4


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/13/07 04:03 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

do you find Jimmy Carr funny?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb87oedXV-4





Thanks... Not sure what steve thought.... I liked it though


kellanscott
(stranger)
07/13/07 02:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

steve, I don't know whether you are a bowie fan or not but I'm quite sure you would know the album Ziggy Stardust. The production on that album was always funny to me when I wasn't caught up in how brilliant the songs were..it sounds tinny, extreme reverb, and not at all matching the in-your-face tone that his live shows took in that era. Even the heavier parts/songs still sound removed (the only exception being Ronson's outro in moonage daydream). Do you think this was intentional as far as making this music sound outter-space prophet style and beginning the fiction of the persona, or just more unintentional factors. I mean bowie sounds like he's singing off the top of a mountain a lot of the time. Wondering if that was ever a point of intrigue for you and any comments you might have as a man of experience.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 04:43 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

is it true that you hate touring Germany?
If so, why? If not, how come you´re here so rarely? And: Would you consider coming anyway (please!)?




Wrong forum


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 05:10 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Um.. Not really. What I'm saying is that a better way to utilize your gift of being able to analyse very complicated concepts is to get into economy. In such field, you could actually cause some damage.



Wrong forum.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 05:23 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I said that at some point music will exist as an embodiment of the scene it originated from. Managers and contracts and even recording techniques will have been part of its set of influences when the sound triggers the personal feelings and ignites, as you said: "everything I think about." Considering all those other things is just an inseparable part of the music isn't it?



FYP.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 05:26 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Am I fat? Please explain in strangely arousing Turkish accent.



Ha-ha laugh at foreign girl. English. Funny. Sports.




electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 05:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Now speaking to the man himself, is this mystery technique something you'd be willing to expand upon a little bit? Does it involve a multitude of intricately arranged microphones or something along those lines?



I have no secrets in the studio. Everything I do is either learned from someone else, in the prior published literature or figured-out from core principles known to pretty much everybody in the game.

In the case of Joanna Newsom's harp, I used close mics, a mono area mic and an ambient mic.

The close mics were four Crown GLM100s attached to the the body of the resonator box, evenly spaced along the length of the harp. I needed four to get even coverage without hot spots, and these mics are small and light enough that they wouldn't interfere with the sound or playing. Taped in place with a little square of gaffer tape, they didn't need stands or other hardware. These mics were recorded discretely (one to a tape track) but could easily have been sub-mixed to stereo.

The area mic was either a Sony C500 or a Neumann U47. We tried both, and I don't recall which was eventually chosen. It was about head-high and about a yard away, directly in front of the harp.

We tried a C24 stereo mic in that position (or a Neumann SM2, I don't remember) but I don't think those survived the audition.

The ambient mic was an AKG C12A in omni, resting on the floor as a boundary mic about 12 feet away in a hard-sided room.

That's it.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 05:49 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

do you find Jimmy Carr funny?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qb87oedXV-4



Wrong forum. And no, not really.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 05:53 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

steve, I don't know whether you are a bowie fan or not but I'm quite sure you would know the album Ziggy Stardust. The production on that album was always funny to me when I wasn't caught up in how brilliant the songs were..it sounds tinny, extreme reverb, and not at all matching the in-your-face tone that his live shows took in that era. Even the heavier parts/songs still sound removed (the only exception being Ronson's outro in moonage daydream). Do you think this was intentional as far as making this music sound outter-space prophet style and beginning the fiction of the persona, or just more unintentional factors. I mean bowie sounds like he's singing off the top of a mountain a lot of the time. Wondering if that was ever a point of intrigue for you and any comments you might have as a man of experience.



Cocaine makes you want to hear things extra-bright. One client of mine even described a particularly nasal vocal effect as being exactly "like when you shoot coke and get a ringer (whining tinnitus) and it sounds like you're in a tube..."

Other than that, I haven't really thought about it. I was never much of a Bowie fan, and I haven't spent a lot of time listening to his music in detail.


sponge
(stranger)
07/13/07 06:49 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

I said that at some point music will exist as an embodiment of the scene it originated from. Managers and contracts and even recording techniques will have been part of its set of influences when the sound triggers the personal feelings and ignites, as you said: "everything I think about." Considering all those other things is just an inseparable part of the music isn't it?



FYP.




Fair enough, that's your method, slightly different than mine. Is it possible then, to like a band you don't know anything about? Also, isn't the term "I pity you" reserved for cartoons and soap operas these days?


thisismylogin
(stranger)
07/13/07 07:20 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

A few years back, I picked up a cd by a band called Technician. I believe (if I remember correctly) that it was produced by Bob Weston. Did you have anything to do with that recording? It sounded very similar to Shellac.

Also, did you actually get a $million$ for recording Bush? I heard you did (obviously).


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/13/07 07:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Also, did you actually get a $million$ for recording Bush? I heard you did (obviously).



No, I got $150,000 straight.


longfellow
(stranger)
07/13/07 07:43 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

do you recall a band you recorded from fort collins, CO called tanger? your thoughts on them?




thisismylogin
(stranger)
07/13/07 07:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Also, did you actually get a $million$ for recording Bush? I heard you did (obviously).



No, I got $150,000 straight.




What about Technician?


born42slippy
(member)
07/13/07 08:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

kick a some dust in Conrad Black face if you get to see him, but you do nothave to chat with him except if you do...tell him a canuck said to do so, lol

Theecomer
(stranger)
07/13/07 11:50 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Silkworm's "In The West" is easily one of my all-time favorite albums. I had heard that the album (or at least many of the songs on it) were recorded in one take (as in everyone is recorded at the same time), vocals and all. I can hear the warble in the vocals at times due to the strumming going on simultaneously.

Is this true about that particular album?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/14/07 02:16 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Silkworm's "In The West" is easily one of my all-time favorite albums. I had heard that the album (or at least many of the songs on it) were recorded in one take (as in everyone is recorded at the same time), vocals and all. I can hear the warble in the vocals at times due to the strumming going on simultaneously.

Is this true about that particular album?



No. Silkworm pretty much always overdubbed the singing, with the exception of a couple of all-acoustic numbers like "Goodnight Mr. Maugham."

You are spot-on about them being great though. Untouchable, great band.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/14/07 02:24 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

do you recall a band you recorded from fort collins, CO called tanger? your thoughts on them?






What do you want to know? I did one session with them, it went okay, they made an album. Their guitar player got to meet some members of the Resurrection Band, his childhood christian rock heroes.

I'm not into these posts where somebody just drops a band's name and expects me to start talking like a nickelodeon. Ask a question I can answer at least.


Transmission3000
(stranger)
07/14/07 03:06 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I once heard the drum room at Electrical referred to as "paid for by Page & Plant." Was that another one of those "he made a million on that one" kinda things where you actually only(!) made $150k or so?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/14/07 03:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Quote:

Also, did you actually get a $million$ for recording Bush? I heard you did (obviously).



No, I got $150,000 straight.




What about Technician?




More like three grand.


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/14/07 04:07 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you ever played guitar hero?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/14/07 05:04 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Have you ever played guitar hero?



No. I tried Dance Dance Revolution once. Looked like a baboon. I am no threat at any video game.


village
(stranger)
07/14/07 06:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

So, Stevie-baby. I made up a joke...
Q: What do The Police and Big Black have in common?
A: In both bands, the drummer was the most talented musician.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/14/07 03:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

So, Stevie-baby. I made up a joke...
Q: What do The Police and Big Black have in common?
A: In both bands, the drummer was the most talented musician.



So, anonymous internet dork. I thought you were done here.
Q: Retard?
A: Retard who likes the Police.


zac777
(member)
07/14/07 03:38 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

On the subject of selling out:

Are there bands you find distasteful enough to reject their music regardless of the quality? My general take is that music should be judged on its own merit, but I know it would be a struggle to buy a Creed record, no matter how phenomenal. If the Jesus Lizard recorded an album under the name "Urge Overkill" or "Nickelback" would you end up loving it?

Of the bands who get a ton of radio play, are there any that you think are original/worthwhile? Personally, I love Tool. Wait for it... But seriously, it doesn't matter too much to me if a band charges 70 bucks for a concert ticket as long as they make good music.

Do you think some bands force their way into mainstream consciousness through sheer force of talent, or does it always require some degree of selling out?

To fit in with this thread I guess I also have to namedrop a band that you've worked with. Hearing Slint for the first time was like getting hit with a brick. A really happy brick. I don't think seeing your name in a 2+2 thread would register in quite as much of a "holy crap!" way if it weren't associated with them.

Also, you should sneak a round of puppet into your next homegame and let us know how it turns out.

Thanks for keeping up with all of the questions, this thread has definitely woken up Emil.


FF_Woodycooks
(enthusiast)
07/14/07 04:25 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Creed and phenomenal should never be in the same sentence.

60Vauban
(journeyman)
07/14/07 06:26 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you listened to Brian Eno's work (personal and collaborative) and wondered how creative he would be if his digital "toys" were taken away? Is there any sound or effect created using Protools that you simply can't recreate in an analog environment? Or perhaps is that just not the point, that the music should be transmitted in its purest form from the studio experience to the commercial release.

Thanks
(a girl who reads BBV and listens to music, holla)


felix240
(stranger)
07/14/07 08:17 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Similarly, how do you regard artists whose idiosyncratic recording style is essential to their musical expression? I think of Jandek, for one, where the hiss and tin are actually as much music as the voice/gtr/whatever. Or Royal Trux, who used effects with a kind of historical and theoretical sophistication...I mean, isn't recording as straight up documentation kind of like a painter limiting himself to portraiture? Isn't any tool useful in the right hands?

brash
(stranger)
07/14/07 09:09 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

have you ever worked with jon brion on any albums? any thoughts on him in particular?

Ribbo
(Pooh-Bah)
07/14/07 10:33 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

My uncle used to be Sting's drummer and in his height was considered one of the top 5 drummers in the UK. They were best man at each others wedding.

Beat: Sting moved on, formed the Police, became mega wealthy, my uncle carried on being a successful session drummer, but ended up drinking heavily, depression set in and died of liver failure.

Brag: I have a DVD video of Sting giving a prerecorded eulogy at my uncle's funeral. Funeral was in Newcastle, and Sting was on tour in America/Japan at the time so couldn't make it over.


60Vauban
(journeyman)
07/14/07 10:46 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Variance: and this matters to me why?

Ribbo
(Pooh-Bah)
07/15/07 12:01 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Variance: and this matters to me why?




Variance: and you not caring matters to me why?


Triumph36
(Good Citizen)
07/15/07 12:07 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

ribbo you are seriously terrible at bbv and bbv4life - stick to posting hidden brag hands in the omaha forums plz

Ribbo
(Pooh-Bah)
07/15/07 12:09 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

ribbo you are seriously terrible at bbv and bbv4life - stick to posting hidden brag hands in the omaha forums plz




Variance: and you not caring matters to me why?


king of the deck
(journeyman)
07/15/07 12:53 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Good Jon Brion question. Cmon Steve... what do you think of Brion

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/15/07 03:06 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Have you listened to Brian Eno's work (personal and collaborative) and wondered how creative he would be if his digital "toys" were taken away?



Eno has answered this question for us. The records he made before he had access to samplers and digital editing are all unique, timeless and fantastic. Since then, meh.
Quote:

Is there any sound or effect created using Protools that you simply can't recreate in an analog environment?



Not with a little effort, no.

Quote:

Or perhaps is that just not the point, that the music should be transmitted in its purest form from the studio experience to the commercial release.



I just think most bands ought to be repected as they exist in nature, and I don't have a strong enough ego to presume that I can "improve" a band by making them change to suit me, or using software to determine the parameters of their weaknesses.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/15/07 03:35 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Similarly, how do you regard artists whose idiosyncratic recording style is essential to their musical expression? I think of Jandek, for one, where the hiss and tin are actually as much music as the voice/gtr/whatever. Or Royal Trux, who used effects with a kind of historical and theoretical sophistication...



Those people make records they do (and have what value they have) precisely because a producer didn't make them change their idiosyncrasies. Bands ought to be allowed to make the record they want to make, without anybody shoe-horning them into a prescribed aesthetic.

Quote:

I mean, isn't recording as straight up documentation kind of like a painter limiting himself to portraiture?



No. A recording engineer isn't a painter. A recording engineer works (or ought to work) under the direction of his client, not ask the client to work to his direction. If a band wants a sound abstracted from reality, fine, but that abstraction ought to be their idea.

Quote:

Isn't any tool useful in the right hands?



In the abstract, sure. But when the things a tool makes easier (editing and manipulation, or, say, automatic machine gun fire) are so subject to disfiguring abuse, there are precious few "right" hands. The tool itself may not be the problem, but having it in use is almost always worse than not.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/15/07 03:57 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

have you ever worked with jon brion on any albums? any thoughts on him in particular?



I haven't worked with him. I've only heard a little bit of his work, and it isn't music that really moves me, but it seems to be executed competently. I guess I don't have much of an opinion on him or it.


Max Raker
(old hand)
07/15/07 04:03 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Was Phil Spector as innovative and important as Rolling Stone says he is?



Oh hells yeah. Most record producers are parasites on the careers of bands and artists, but Phil Spector was actually the creator of everything on the records he produced, regardless of whose name was on the credits. He was also an extreme sex perv freak, gun nut and paranoid coke fiend. he was about as high-roller as dudes like that can be, and it all drove him nuts. Unique character.




Have you ever met Phil or was good friends with anybody who has worked with him? I have heard some pretty crazy stories about him including one in which he tied up John Lennon during a session and pointed a loaded gun at him. Not sure if it is just gossip, but it seems like even in a field that has its share of unstable people, Spector manages to stand out.


killideas
(stranger)
07/15/07 11:43 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Recording the Godspeed record where there any particular challenges recording a group that big (or perhaps they were pared down for recording?). They have a reputation for being this quiet shadowy group. True? I've always assumed this was a rep that came from not talking to the media etc so media just makes something up. Also any particular reason you didn't mix the record? Was the final project much of a departure from what left your studio? How long did the record take to make? thnx.

damntang
(stranger)
07/15/07 02:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve,

Who is the drunk wrestling you at the end pig pile?

Have you got any new jokes?

Will Shellac ever play outside of London or ATP in the UK?

..and my friend asks

"There is a big black song with with like a party blower on it and it sounds like it's coming from a very specific place in the headphones - I want to know how you do that, it's spacial field is extremely realistic. I was walking through lichfield listening to it one day, and I thought someone in the street was doing it"

Have you heard of an album called 'The Holy Bible' by Manic Street Preachers?

What do you think of the current British music scene...new rave etc?


damntang
(stranger)
07/15/07 03:10 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve,

have you ever been in a studio with someone that just dampens the whole atmosphere with their mood, or ignorance?
If so, did you manage to overcome that obstacle?


whale_hunter
(member)
07/15/07 03:49 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve

How many pages do you think this thread will go? How many did you think it would go when you started it?
Is it getting more or less anttention than you thought it would?


thespoil
(journeyman)
07/15/07 05:15 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hi Steve,

have you ever been in a studio with someone that just dampens the whole atmosphere with their mood, or ignorance?
If so, did you manage to overcome that obstacle?




If you actually read this thread you would already know that the answer to any question about a negative studio experience is almost certainly Urge Overkill.


damntang
(stranger)
07/15/07 05:18 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Hi Steve,

have you ever been in a studio with someone that just dampens the whole atmosphere with their mood, or ignorance?
If so, did you manage to overcome that obstacle?




If you actually read this thread you would already know that the answer to any question about a negative studio experience is almost certainly Urge Overkill.




Ah F*ck You


nerdwaves
(stranger)
07/15/07 08:08 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

steve albini,

thanks for articulating what it is that has always bothered me about bands selling their songs for commercials!

i'm curious if you have heard about musicthing.org yet and what you think about it. they have a link to your classic piece "The Problem With Music" on there. apparently their first band recorded using a toy 1 watt amp and fake drums. is it even possible to make a toy amp sound that noisy?

i've heard you kind of trash talk the pixies in the past as kind of middle-of-the-road or something. do you think it's possible to state objectively that a band sucks? or is it always just opinion?

what was it about urge overkill that rubbed you the wrong way? i like their records and saw them play a weird one-off show a few years ago at the troubadour in LA. they were really really good. they seem to be your catch-all whipping boy band -- can you reveal the true story behind your disdain?

and i've read that kurt cobain had all kinds of crazy ideas about how to mic drums which you helped him realize on in utero (in keeping with your engineering philosophy i guess). can you describe what the set up was?

i had no idea you worked on the new joanna newsom record. i love the milk eyed mender but haven't heard the new one. she is completely amazing.

thanks for keeping your s!#$ real.


SaulPaul
(member)
07/15/07 08:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

ok serious q this time, why is whoisthedrizzle funny?

buhce
(stranger)
07/15/07 11:52 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Hi Steve,

have you ever been in a studio with someone that just dampens the whole atmosphere with their mood, or ignorance?
If so, did you manage to overcome that obstacle?




If you actually read this thread you would already know that the answer to any question about a negative studio experience is almost certainly Urge Overkill.




Who are you now, his mom?


thespoil
(journeyman)
07/16/07 01:43 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Quote:

Hi Steve,

have you ever been in a studio with someone that just dampens the whole atmosphere with their mood, or ignorance?
If so, did you manage to overcome that obstacle?




If you actually read this thread you would already know that the answer to any question about a negative studio experience is almost certainly Urge Overkill.




Who are you now, his mom?




LOL. You registered to post that. Brilliant


rhythm_spelldit
(stranger)
07/16/07 03:06 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Would-Be Recording Engineer Student: please follow the aforementioned advice and invest in a baccalaureate or associate’s degree from an accredited college. And make sure that the core liberal arts curriculum includes at least one English course, remedial if necessary.

Such vocational/academic preparation will ultimately enrich your intellectual life, trust me. And just as importantly, it may save you from, say, misspelling the phrase “one thousand hertz” into a studio log book. Because you’ll never live it down. You’ll be history – literally . . .


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/16/07 03:37 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Who is the drunk wrestling you at the end pig pile?



A friend of mine, impaired by booze. He's better now.

Quote:

Have you got any new jokes?



Guy walks into a bar and says, "How much does it cost to make a record?"

Bartender says, "Well, a simple record without any overdubs or anything fancy you can do for about a grand. More elaborate records can cost up to a million dollars."

Guy says, "Can I have one of those million-dollar records for a grand?"

Bartender says, "Sorry, no."

Guy says, "That Albini guy is a dick."

Quote:

Will Shellac ever play outside of London or ATP in the UK?



We've already played in Manchester, Leeds, Edinburgh, Belfast, Dorset, Newport and... must be another couple places.
Quote:


"There is a big black song with with like a party blower on it and it sounds like it's coming from a very specific place in the headphones - I want to know how you do that, it's spacial field is extremely realistic. I was walking through lichfield listening to it one day, and I thought someone in the street was doing it"



You high.

Quote:

Have you heard of an album called 'The Holy Bible' by Manic Street Preachers?



Nope.

Quote:

What do you think of the current British music scene...new rave etc?



I know nothing about the current British music scene. I just assumed it was atrocious, like it has been since the mid-1980s, the last time I paid attention.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/16/07 04:11 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

How many pages do you think this thread will go? How many did you think it would go when you started it?
Is it getting more or less anttention than you thought it would?



I wasn't expecting this thread to garner any attention outside 2+2, and I'll admit that I'm surprised by the interest. I think I would have preferred it if hadn't been so completely inundated with non-2+2 inquiries, but you can't tell people what to take an interest in.


RoyalStraight
(stranger)
07/16/07 05:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Wow, just noticed this thread.

What was it like working with Godspeed You! Black Emperor? I always imagine working on an album like that would be extremely difficult, given their style.


Xylem
(addict)
07/16/07 09:12 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Im an amateur upcoming drum and bass/ house/garage producer and was told that to make money i should cu my tunes to vinyl and sell them as white labels to a record shop...

Is this true electrical?


killideas
(stranger)
07/16/07 11:06 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I enjoyed the thoughtful comments on Billy Corgan...what is the general perception of Liz Phair in Chicago, both now and at the height of her Guyville/Whipsmart phase. Also wonder what you think of Brad Wood as a producer/engineer? Thoughts on John McIntyre as a producer? Ever been to his studo...similar to yours?

damntang
(stranger)
07/16/07 11:08 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

Any plays to release Pig Pile (or any of the other Big Black videos I've heard about) on DVD?

Have Shellac ever been photographed doing a silly walk over the crossing at Abbey Road?

What Song/Album/Artist is your 'Guilty Pleasure'?

I was once told by a band they "don't play a venues with plastic rooves because it's near impossible to get a good sound" - it that a load of bollocks?

I have a joke for you:

Did you hear about the guy with 5 dicks?

They say his condoms fitted him like I glove!

A Thank you...


buhce
(stranger)
07/16/07 11:24 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hello 'Albini',

Although you seem quite anti-digital, in respect to recording sound,or maybe just more so, music.Do you think that if you were in the same position today as you were when you first thought about recording your own music, you'd have embraced the technology - un-willingly or otherwise.Or do you think you would have still sought after, the more expensive,more cumbersome,more second hand (and harder to get fix with a steeper learning curve,especially these days) alternative, of analogue?

And as a "side question" your early Big Black recordings aside and with this:
Quote:


No. A recording engineer isn't a painter. A recording engineer works (or ought to work) under the direction of his client, not ask the client to work to his direction. If a band wants a sound abstracted from reality, fine, but that abstraction ought to be their idea.




- work ethic in mind.Does that mean you have never been apart of a "layered" recording before,where the band records not only separatly but to a click track? And if not, why not, and does it mean you would agree to be at the helm of such a recording if a band expressed the desire to record in such a way ?

Thanks, for your time.


wetbo100
(stranger)
07/16/07 12:37 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Im actually really excited I happened upon this thread (through a completely different source than appears to have been mentioned) because I have been told so much about 2p2 but I never got my lazy ass over here before.

So, Steve,

are you a rabid music categorizer? Do you yourself fall into the music nerd category?


offyerhead
(stranger)
07/16/07 12:58 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


I know nothing about the current British music scene. I just assumed it was atrocious, like it has been since the mid-1980s, the last time I paid attention.




Never heard of the Manics' Holy Bible? The last 20 years of British music has been atrocious?

For someone who seems to pride himself on economical, precise answers this one seems either lazy, xenophobic or stupid.


wicky
(stranger)
07/16/07 02:16 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hello Mr. Albini,

Listening to one of the numerous great records you did (i.e. heal all monsters by honey for petzi) with a friend. Snare comes in. Friend says: "Oh, Albini".

Of course, it's a great snare, and for most of the records you do it fits in quite well, but isn't it sort of strange for a man who so often says that he's "just a technician" and who seems to be pretty intent on capturing the band's own individual sound, to give such a distinct "albini touch" to the records he does?

(This is by no means an aggressive question, god knows I love your records!)

Thanks for doing this q&a thing by the way, and sorry for intruding on the 2+2 people so rudely...


Transmission3000
(stranger)
07/16/07 04:20 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:


I know nothing about the current British music scene. I just assumed it was atrocious, like it has been since the mid-1980s, the last time I paid attention.




Never heard of the Manics' Holy Bible? The last 20 years of British music has been atrocious?

For someone who seems to pride himself on economical, precise answers this one seems either lazy, xenophobic or stupid.



Don't ask a question you don't want to know the answer to, I guess.

"Buy the ticket, take the ride." - Dr. Hunter S. Thompson


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/16/07 06:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Never heard of the Manics' Holy Bible? The last 20 years of British music has been atrocious?

For someone who seems to pride himself on economical, precise answers this one seems either lazy, xenophobic or stupid.



Or economical and precise. There have been a few interesting British bands in the last 20 years (if pressed, I could probably name ten), but the UK music scene taken as a whole? Throw it in the chipper.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/16/07 06:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Im an amateur upcoming drum and bass/ house/garage producer and was told that to make money i should cu my tunes to vinyl and sell them as white labels to a record shop...

Is this true electrical?



I have no idea. I have heard anecdotally that white labels sell quite well to DJs, and there used to be a shop near our studio called Just Dance that specialized in white labels, but I don't know the current state of the DJ bait market.


Xylem
(addict)
07/16/07 06:19 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Tx electrical....

But the UK music scene is way better than the US... Can u say Arctic Monkeys...


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/16/07 06:21 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Tx electrical....

But the UK music scene is way better than the US... Can u say Arctic Monkeys...





BWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!

*deep breath*

BWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!


Hanys
(stranger)
07/16/07 08:21 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Name those ten interesting British bands of the last 20 years. If not ten, then at least some. Press you.

Do you like any of Meat Puppets albums? Songs? Jokes?

I read you call one of those todays-music-sucks gurus a defeatist. But I sort of understand them. I feel like growing old backwards, kind of. When it comes to music, definitely, instead of seeing the nwe bands, new music innovative compared to the old one, I actually hear any new approach only when searching in the past. Can't avoid the comparsion, can't listen to what I consider [censored]. You're a recording engineer or/and technican or/and whatever, you can't afford to give up on music saying it sucks like many of the fans do. Still, don't you feel that.. [censored].

Don't you feel retarded sometimes? If you take that as an offense, it's not my problem as long as you answer those questions I asked. Thanks.


Hamas
(stranger)
07/17/07 04:00 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

You recorded the Owls record a few years back... what is your impression of their band, and of Tim Kinsella? He seems to have an odd reputation around Chicago.

Also, if you have any good David Yow stories I'm sure the forum would love to read them.


unsignedstudios
(stranger)
07/17/07 05:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hello steve, this is my first post.

Would love to get some tips off you, not so much on a technical level as i'm sure you've done that to death but more how you've got your name your name out there.

At the moment I'm doing what’s probably the typical, finding 2 or 3 bands (outside of paying clients) i see making leeway and giving them free recording time in the hope that i can use they're name as a reference in the future. From these few free sessions they've all been blown away with results, most likely that’s because they thought it was just going to be studio practice for them and a bit of a throw away.

I suppose another question is, did you find specific scenes had they’re own ‘click’ and you had to socialise or do specific things to get in with them. Whether it was record labels or bands leading that specific genre.

I see a lot more of this hush hush bubble that bands seem to be in the further I dig (slyly, always slyly). So if they’re was a moment you were giving a golden age of recording how did it happen and did you stop it due to burning yourself out or are you still there chugging away?

Please have a look at my website or myspace if you get the chance, just to see what I’m up to etc.

www.myspace.com/unsignedstudiosuk
www.unsignedstudios.com


Thanks for any responses
Shane


felix83
(addict)
07/17/07 07:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hello steve, this is my first post.

Would love to get some tips off you, not so much on a technical level as i'm sure you've done that to death but more how you've got your name your name out there.

At the moment I'm doing what’s probably the typical, finding 2 or 3 bands (outside of paying clients) i see making leeway and giving them free recording time in the hope that i can use they're name as a reference in the future. From these few free sessions they've all been blown away with results, most likely that’s because they thought it was just going to be studio practice for them and a bit of a throw away.

I suppose another question is, did you find specific scenes had they’re own ‘click’ and you had to socialise or do specific things to get in with them. Whether it was record labels or bands leading that specific genre.

I see a lot more of this hush hush bubble that bands seem to be in the further I dig (slyly, always slyly). So if they’re was a moment you were giving a golden age of recording how did it happen and did you stop it due to burning yourself out or are you still there chugging away?

Please have a look at my website or myspace if you get the chance, just to see what I’m up to etc.

www.myspace.com/unsignedstudiosuk
www.unsignedstudios.com


Thanks for any responses
Shane




Why is it that people find this opportunity important enough to register and post a whole long message, but not important enough to read any of the rest of the thread?


damntang
(stranger)
07/17/07 08:10 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Never heard of the Manics' Holy Bible? The last 20 years of British music has been atrocious?

For someone who seems to pride himself on economical, precise answers this one seems either lazy, xenophobic or stupid.



Or economical and precise. There have been a few interesting British bands in the last 20 years (if pressed, I could probably name ten), but the UK music scene taken as a whole? Throw it in the chipper.




The thing is with the UK music scene is, it's too focused on bland 'bloke' types lazily strumming acoustic guitars, trying to be romantic with out sounding like a 'poof' and singing in a pub yawn.

Most of the bands are trying to write songs that people will jump up and down to at festivals or songs that will be played on 'Match of the Day' goal highlihgts...or even worse fame school [censored] who have a style to sell to Topman.

MSP, in particular 'The Holy Bible' are an acception to the rule...(Achieves of Pain anyone?)


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/17/07 11:50 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:


Why is it that people find this opportunity important enough to register and post a whole long message, but not important enough to read any of the rest of the thread?




QFT

This once-great thread is getting ruined.


ec3to1
(stranger)
07/18/07 01:51 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I hate to be another one of these register-just-for-this-thread pests but it's not every day something this valuable happens on the internet, so here's a few questions.

-Shellac records somehow make it to the CD format with their dynamic range still intact, which is great, but I've heard other albums that you recorded (High On Fire is a good example) that are completely obliterated with peak limiting. How much control do you and the rest of the band have over the mastering of your own records? And how much control, if any, do you have over the mastering of your recordings of other bands?

-All Music Guide claims that you were "infuriated" when the Jesus Lizard left T&G for the majors. Is there any shred of truth to this?

-Are you a fan of any Chicago avant garde jazz, like the Art Ensemble, Anthony Braxton, et al? If so, could you name a favorite record or two from that scene?

Anyway, thank you for Billiard Player Song at the T&G Anniversary show. That put a huge smile on my face and caused me to say lots of superlatives for the next few days.

Also, at the Shellac show at Martyr's a couple years ago I told you to do the devil-horns with your hand, and then I snapped a picture of you on slide film. It's mildly amusing. One of these days I'll scan it in and email it to Electrical.

My apologies for being a leech on this forum.

-EC


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/18/07 05:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Recording the Godspeed record where there any particular challenges recording a group that big (or perhaps they were pared down for recording?). They have a reputation for being this quiet shadowy group. True? I've always assumed this was a rep that came from not talking to the media etc so media just makes something up. Also any particular reason you didn't mix the record? Was the final project much of a departure from what left your studio? How long did the record take to make? thnx.



The Godspeed! sessions were done in two chunks, totalling about three weeks, and were taxing, but inspiring in a couple of weird ways.

The collective aspect of the band is something I'm familiar with and comfortable with, so that wasn't a problem, other than occasionally having to get everybody together and discuss different options at a little more length than usual. It intruded more when trying to decide where the smokers were going to smoke than any recording consideration.

Anybody who has been in even a three-piece band knows how difficult it can be to keep the peace, and I was impressed at the lengths these guys went to to make sure everyone in the band was heard.

The formal elements of the band and the music have their own inherent problems. The band had nine members: two drummers, three electric guitarists, two bassists, a 'cello, violin, various mallet percussion instruments, a music box and a penny whistle. Their music often has crescendos that begin very quiet (ppp) and are eventually hard rock loud (ffff). This mix of loud and quiet sounds, acoustic and electric instruments and a lot of people makes even the physical setup in the studio difficult. We had to try several arrangements of chairs and rooms, often moving everything involved in the session before everyone was comfortable.

The next problem was recording both the very quiet and very loud sounds accurately. Ordinarily, small adjustments can be made in mixing to compensate for louder and quieter parts, but this was an extreme case, with an active dynamic range of better than 28dB. The conventional or hack approach to a problem of wide dynamic range is to use compressors to restrict the top-end of the dynamic range, but I have never liked the artificial sound quality imparted by this method.

The "clamping" action of the compressor is noticeable, and it sacrifices detail at the highest point of the dynamic, when the music is reaching its biggest moments. This would be a particularly inappropriate choice for a band like Godspeed! Still, I needed to be able to ride the gain on as many as a dozen microphones in a smooth, repeatable fashion, so I used the channel grouping feature of our console to create sub-masters for each of the instruments, and I rode the gain on the individual instruments, keeping them at a reasonable level throughout the course of songs as long as ten minutes.

Several of the pieces were meant to flow seamlessly from one to the next, but could not be performed this way because of instrument changes or other reasons, so I needed to be able to knit together several chunks recorded separately while maintaining the illusion that they were performed at once. In most cases there was a transitional moment, where piece "A" ended and piece "B" started, so these transitional moments were scripted into each piece, so there would be a range of editing options. In once case, there was a gradual guitar crescendo, so the edit needed to observe that dynamic and avoid creating a jarring change. This part of the session organization took more thought and preparation than I was expecting, but eventually it all worked out.

There were some additional musicians recorded for a couple of parts, in particular a string section comprising several double-basses, but the original session was still set-up and couldn't be disturbed, so during this period the band were occupying both studios.

As the session progressed, individual players needed to add overdubs, and we would concentrate on one person until finished, and then move on to the next player. This part of the session involved some very long days for me, and it seemed like the band were eating and sleeping in shifts while I worked every minute.

Eventually, the record was finished and mixed, and the band went on their way. I wasn't party to the discussions after they left, but with such a complex project, it isn't surprising that there were things the band were dissatisfied with over time, and they decided to mix the album themselves (there was some additional recording done as well) at the studio they normally used in Montreal, with an engineer (Howard Bilerman) who is a friend and an important part of their extended family. That they were eventually happy enough to release the record is good enough for me.

Any other complications involved boiled down to me not speaking French very well, the US border crossings being a bastard, and Canadians being weird in general.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/18/07 06:43 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hello steve, this is my first post.

Would love to get some tips off you, not so much on a technical level as i'm sure you've done that to death but more how you've got your name your name out there.



You do this by "advertizing." Here's a pretty good example: You buy-in for the minimum, and post in late position. Regardless of your hole cards (I would suggest not looking at them), if it's limped to you, make a sizable raise pre-flop, Say 6xBB +1BB for every limper. If it's raised in front of you, re-raise to about 1/3 your stack. If you get called, push any flop. If you get called, flip your random cards over and say something about how you like to gamble. If you don't get called, flip your cards over and say "you guys play too tight!" After that, you'll want to re-buy (or add-on if you get lucky) up to the table maximum and play normal poker. Your advertising budget should not exceed one minimum buy-in.

I have to warn you though, playing like this is strangely addictive, and you must resist the urge to barrel ahead with huge random raises and pushing all-in with crappy cards. You might end up betting on sports.




electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/18/07 07:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

-Shellac records somehow make it to the CD format with their dynamic range still intact, which is great, but I've heard other albums that you recorded (High On Fire is a good example) that are completely obliterated with peak limiting. How much control do you and the rest of the band have over the mastering of your own records? And how much control, if any, do you have over the mastering of your recordings of other bands?



It's pretty rare that I have any influence on the mastering of records I record. I always give my recommendations, but what happens to the record after it leaves here is the business of the band and the label. I didn't think the High on Fire record fared too badly though.

Quote:

-All Music Guide claims that you were "infuriated" when the Jesus Lizard left T&G for the majors. Is there any shred of truth to this?



I was pretty disappointed in the band, because they were successful at proving the point that some bands are best served by independent labels, and they seemed too smart to fall for sucker bait. Most of their contemporaries who signed to major labels didn't do well, selling no more records (often fewer) than they had on independent labels, and ultimately ground themselves apart trying to fit into the mainstream. That the Jesus Lizard made this calculated move knowing these stories intimately made it even more puzzling.

In the wash, they made their final couple of lesser albums for a big label, they got a chunk of "extra" money out of it, and maybe the band had reached the end of their rope anyway. Who knows. It was a long time ago, the records that established their reputation survive as monuments, and they deserve credit for busting ass in the first place.

Quote:

-Are you a fan of any Chicago avant garde jazz, like the Art Ensemble, Anthony Braxton, et al? If so, could you name a favorite record or two from that scene?



Not so much. I think this music is from the hearts of the people making it, and I respect them. I just have no taste for it.




electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/18/07 07:23 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Although you seem quite anti-digital, in respect to recording sound,or maybe just more so, music.Do you think that if you were in the same position today as you were when you first thought about recording your own music, you'd have embraced the technology - un-willingly or otherwise.Or do you think you would have still sought after, the more expensive,more cumbersome,more second hand (and harder to get fix with a steeper learning curve,especially these days) alternative, of analogue?



I think I would have done whatever everybody else was doing. I don't think the advantages of analog recording are obvious to people who don't work with it everyday, and who haven't seen digital recording technologies consistently fail to solve their fundamental problems.

Quote:

Does that mean you have never been apart of a "layered" recording before,where the band records not only separatly but to a click track?




I have. That's how I know it's a drag.

Quote:

And if not, why not, and does it mean you would agree to be at the helm of such a recording if a band expressed the desire to record in such a way ?




I'll do whatever the band wants to do. I haven't had good results using the piecemeal technique you describe so I don't generally advocate it, but if somebody wants to do it, then whatever, it's his funeral.


ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/18/07 07:56 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Not sure how to ask this without sounding snarky... 2p2 regular and big fan here. I am curious what you would say now about this quote:

"WHEN IN FIVE YEARS, THIS REMARKABLE ACHIEVEMENT IN THE ADVANCEMENT OF FIDELITY IS OBSOLETE AND UNPLAYABLE ON ANY 'MODERN' EQUIPMENT, REMEMBER: IN 1971, THE 8-TRACK TAPE WAS THE STATE OF THE ART." -- Steve Albini about CDs, 1987.

Have you changed your opinion about digital or the media now that twenty years have elapsed?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/18/07 08:32 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

what is the general perception of Liz Phair in Chicago, both now and at the height of her Guyville/Whipsmart phase.



Liz Phair was quite popular in Chicago both from the time of her first album and the cassettes she released earlier. It wasn't music meant for me, so it's no surprise that I didn't appreciate it, but plenty of people thought she was great.

The shine came off around the time of her second album, and subsequent records haven't been received too well. While she has always been a bit of a nipple exhibitionist, she reached "dirty mom" status recently. MILF-aspiring but still MINLF. Also, what's up with her lifting her chin so we look up her snout in her photos?

Quote:

Also wonder what you think of Brad Wood as a producer/engineer? Thoughts on John McIntyre as a producer? Ever been to his studo...similar to yours?



The old Idful studio was a valuable resource for bands in Chicago, and a lot of good records came out of there. Brad went to some lengths to get a "real" career with a big record label, and in so doing kinda took himself out of the loop with regard to local bands, and he sealed the deal by moving to California, but while he was here he did a bunch of good records with a bunch of bands and was well-liked.

Engine, the studio he was last associated with before he moved, has ties to some of the real creeps of the Chicago music business oligarchy, and I've never been there. He is no longer involved in it, as far as I know, but the studio is still open for business.

Soma, John McEntire's studio is a nice place with a restored Trident A-Range console, a real gem. The studio was built with help from the guys that built Electrical, and it shares some similarities, but is more aimed at the hybrid electronic/live aesthetic. Soma has an outstanding collection of analog keyboards and synthesizers. A lot of good records have been made there and John is both a good engineer and a great drummer.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/18/07 09:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

"WHEN IN FIVE YEARS, THIS REMARKABLE ACHIEVEMENT IN THE ADVANCEMENT OF FIDELITY IS OBSOLETE AND UNPLAYABLE ON ANY 'MODERN' EQUIPMENT, REMEMBER: IN 1971, THE 8-TRACK TAPE WAS THE STATE OF THE ART." -- Steve Albini about CDs, 1987.

Have you changed your opinion about digital or the media now that twenty years have elapsed?



I was off by a little, but right in principle. Do you own an Ipod? That's not a CD player, is it.

Vinyl records will still be in current manufacture after CDs are a dimming memory. Vinyl sales have been trending up, as have electronic sales (downloads), while CD sales have been in decline.


ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/18/07 09:44 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity


Quote:

Quote:

"WHEN IN FIVE YEARS, THIS REMARKABLE ACHIEVEMENT IN THE ADVANCEMENT OF FIDELITY IS OBSOLETE AND UNPLAYABLE ON ANY 'MODERN' EQUIPMENT, REMEMBER: IN 1971, THE 8-TRACK TAPE WAS THE STATE OF THE ART." -- Steve Albini about CDs, 1987.

Have you changed your opinion about digital or the media now that twenty years have elapsed?



I was off by a little, but right in principle. Do you own an Ipod? That's not a CD player, is it.




I don't want to put words in your mouth, but as I recall, your argument was that digital recordings were fragile and unrecoverable, thus analog was the preferred format. CDs are still by far the dominant format in an admitted failing industry and the public moving to ipods doesn't exactly support your point, right?

This argument is two decades old, so I am sorry if I misremembered your original point....

Quote:

Vinyl records will still be in current manufacture after CDs are a dimming memory. Vinyl sales have been trending up, as have electronic sales (downloads), while CD sales have been in decline.




The way I understand it, vinyl sales are only trending up for 7 inches, not cds, more for 'trend' value than media shift. And since when does the trends and whims of the public make a compelling argument for you? Your point was that the media would be unplayable.

Sincerely looking forward to your response...


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/18/07 10:13 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Cds have a per-unit lifespan of 20 years or so, if you're lucky. Many fail in as little as 5 years. Other than physically breaking or gouging it, there's no reason a vinyl record won't last several hundred years. Purely-digital data (downloads and other sound files) are infinitely more fragile, since they exist only resident on a drive (which is itself vulnerable to failure) and dependent on software to make any sound at all, and that software is beholden to the software maker for all its functionality, and that software is beholden to the computer industry as a whole. This is more of a problem with proprietary file formats for professional use, but it is true nonetheless.

I have been through this particular debate almost as often as the major label vs independent label debate, and I don't have the energy to recite all the point-by-point discussions, but if you do archive searches at prosoundweb and rec.audio.pro and the Ampexlist at recordist.com you'll find several thousand words from me on the topic.

Once you're up at the front of the boat, we can discuss what's ahead.

Regarding sales, CD's only real advantage (not perceived, but real) over vinyl is convenience, and that is how they won their market share. Ipods et al trump that step in convenience by a mile, and so I expect that CDs will lose the convenience-first battle to downloads. That will be the end of them.


ICallHimGamblor
(addict)
07/18/07 10:44 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Cds have a per-unit lifespan of 20 years or so, if you're lucky. Many fail in as little as 5 years. Other than physically breaking or gouging it, there's no reason a vinyl record won't last several hundred years. Purely-digital data (downloads and other sound files) are infinitely more fragile, since they exist only resident on a drive (which is itself vulnerable to failure) and dependent on soft aware to make any sound at all, and that software is beholden to the software maker for all its functionality, and that software is beholden to the computer industry as a whole. This is more of a problem with proprietary file formats for professional use, but it is true nonetheless.

I have been through this particular debate almost as often as the major label vs independent label debate, and I don't have the energy to recite all the point-by-point discussions, but if you do archive searches at prosoundweb and rec.audio.pro and the Ampexlist at recordist.com you'll find several thousand words from me on the topic.

Once you're up at the front of the boat, we can discuss what's ahead.

Regarding sales, CD's only real advantage (not perceived, but real) over vinyl is convenience, and that is how they won their market share. Ipods et al trump that step in convenience by a mile, and so I expect that CDs will lose the convenience-first battle to downloads. That will be the end of them.




You are right... I know you have had this argument a zillion times before, and will go through prosoundweb and recordist sites to see what you have written before. I just wondered if there was any new perspective from what I have seen you write in the past few years.

I refuse to tread in rec.audio.pro anymore because of the jawdropping arrogance (gawddamn, I hate fletcher), or the electrical forums (because of the nine million irrelevant posts by TooManyHelicopters and his ilk or the bizarre tangents about Karl Rove).

Have a nice evening, and thanks for humoring me. Baseball is still boring.


village
(stranger)
07/19/07 12:56 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Oh, Stevie-baby. I still love you no matter what.
So, did you buy the This Heat boxed set or did you already own everything in it?
And here's another joke:
Q: How many Steve Albini's does it take to change a light bulb?
A: "The light bulb wanted me to change it but I just left it like it was originally."


king of the deck
(journeyman)
07/19/07 01:48 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

steve,
what do you think of the mellotron?

yes thats a serious question

as an aside this thread has motivated me to check out a lot of good music i wouldnt otherwise... i really enjoy rocking the jesus lizard albums while playing HU sngs...


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/19/07 02:03 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

steve,
what do you think of the mellotron?



The mellotron, for those unfamiliar, was a keyboard instrument that played magnetic tape recordings of notes played by real instruments or voices. It made its most famous appearances on the Beatles' "Strawberry Fields," where it played the staccato recorder part, and several Led Zeppelin songs, where it generally played as a string section.

They're kind of a pain to keep working properly (they never really work 100 percent), and the keyboardist has to be able to adjust to the unusual feel of the keyboard, but they have a charming sound and are a neat little character element when they're used appropriately. Ours has two sets of tapes, for a total of 6 voices, and gets used pretty often.


galmost
(member)
07/19/07 02:34 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Whats your stars sn?

Favourite pornstar?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/19/07 03:01 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Whats your stars sn?



Don't have an active account. Used to play on a shared account, so I shouldn't give the SN.

Quote:

Favourite pornstar?



No real favorites. I kinda admire truly hideous people who have made a career out of being naked and getting laid on camera, the clear champion being Ron Jeremy. I guess "admire" is too strong a word.


pointfive
(stranger)
07/19/07 03:36 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

First to the 2+2 folks upon whose turf I reluctantly tread: thanks for tolerating us slobbering fanboys/girls as we clamber to pick Mr. Albini's cortex. You've been most gracious.

A quick question or two for you, Steve: during your many years in the music business, I'm sure you've been made countless offers that would require you to compromise your values in order to accept. Have there been any you were particularly tempted by? Were there any you seriously considered accepting? (Or did accept?) Share as many details as you like.

And thanks for your well-crafted and clearly expressed sentiments about the music industry, both within this thread and outside of it. You're an inspiration, and it's great to not have to learn a lot of what you talk about the hard way. Not to mention, as a musician you've helped me to remain focused on what's important rather than the nonsense I "should" be trying to "accomplish".


pointfive
(stranger)
07/19/07 04:57 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Also, any tips for recording violin? Any special considerations to take into account when recording electric violin vs. acoustic?

I tend to equate violin to a vocal performance, somewhat. Am I way off base? When I started to think this way, my results improved, but they're still nowhere near what I'd consider good.


king of the deck
(journeyman)
07/19/07 06:26 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

steve,
what do you think of the mellotron?



The mellotron, for those unfamiliar, was a keyboard instrument that played magnetic tape recordings of notes played by real instruments or voices. It made its most famous appearances on the Beatles' "Strawberry Fields," where it played the staccato recorder part, and several Led Zeppelin songs, where it generally played as a string section.

They're kind of a pain to keep working properly (they never really work 100 percent), and the keyboardist has to be able to adjust to the unusual feel of the keyboard, but they have a charming sound and are a neat little character element when they're used appropriately. Ours has two sets of tapes, for a total of 6 voices, and gets used pretty often.




6 voices? i only know of the recorder/flute, string section, and choir voices. what others are there?

yeah "when used appropriately" i guess that is the key with mellotron. i have some pretty good tron samples and i put them on pretty much every song i record lol (also vibraphone samples)
and yes i use digital because it is essentially free.
i just think the mellotron flute is about the greatest sounding thing ever, up there with a real violin. also when i think of famous records/bands who used mellotron i usually think of the first king crimson album because it is very prominent on multiple songs... but yeah strawberry fields, everyone knows the intro.

anyway jesus lizard.. other than liar and goat which have been mentioned in this thread, what other albums of theirs should i check out?
ty steve


buhce
(stranger)
07/19/07 08:20 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hello again and thanks for you previous reply,

Quote:

The conventional or hack approach to a problem of wide dynamic range is to use compressors to restrict the top-end of the dynamic range, but I have never liked the artificial sound quality imparted by this method.




But you must use compressors for some things, though surely. As I've read a many articles which claim that you don't and wouldn't touch them 10ft pole, which doesn't seem like your approach to things, from what I've gathered from your forum responses.My presumption is that you do use them and writers of these 'articles' colour your opinions by means of their understanding of language rather than a neutral position and as result try and caracature you.Which is extremely frustrating from my stand point, when you're trying to teach yourself.So just to set the 'record' ( no pun intended) straight perhaps.If you do use them on a typical Steve Albini recording ( if there is such a thing) what do you find yourself using them on and for what gain.(again no pun intended)

And yet another side question that you've probably been asked loads of times, but who pushes the record button and mans the desk when you've been recording shellac material?

Thanks again.


Dazell
(stranger)
07/19/07 11:41 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

you've stuck to your game throughout your career, that's so inspirational to so many people. do you think it's possible for a solo artist to be picked up by an independent label without having played live shows? Or if that's like not having sex and expecting babies

hotbeatz
(stranger)
07/19/07 01:07 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Have you heard any New Orleans brass band music? It's some loud, raw, live music that I've always thought would benefit from your recording style.

SpleenLSD
(member)
07/19/07 01:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

My turntable died about 3+ years ago and I haven't listened to vinyl since (hey, I've been busy). Sure, I have CDs and MP3s etc., but there's almost no redundancy with my LPs. I can't listen to Double Nickles on the Dime 'cause the CD & even my old cassette copy are missing tracks. It just ain't the same. I thought about getting one of those turntables with the USB plug if I chose to make a digi copy of this or that, but the thing looks like a total POS.

Where are the decent turntables these days? I haven't had to buy one in 20 years. Other than getting a direct drive, isn't the cartridge the most important piece? The Technics 1200 is the only quality turntable I can recall. Any suggestions?

BTW, I bought 3 copies of the Marmoset/Hated Chinee 7" when it came out after I was told it would be an exciting collectible and make me rich when I sold it. First, am I a douche and second, what'lya gimme for it?


themagicmanmdt
(stranger)
07/20/07 02:28 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Sorry about being yet another musically inclined person, registering on the forums, just for a possible question or two. Thanks to Tapeop-ers for posting the thread, you know.

I've got a few short ones - answer if you want, and which ones you want.

1) After reading the reply you posted about working in studios nowadays (which basically was that many people are at home recoring now, and studios are mainly solo or very small manpower operations, of sorts), I didn't know how you'd think on if you weren't in your shoes you are now - if you still think it's a sane idea of opening a recording studio, and if it's just financially feasable, without going under. It seems that's the common trend - large equipment investments, a year of debts, then liquidation. I can't help but see it and hear about it all the time. Would you consider it the engineers fault, or just how things are going now? If you didn't have EA and 'Albini' wasn't a buzz word, would you start from the ground up?

2) Quantegy shut it's doors. Not new news. New production analog tape is going kaput. Do you think that we'll even come to a crisis about it - having tape at feasable prices for studio tracking? Or, will it all be used up, and no one will make it anymore? What's your take on the true future of the recording medium?

3) Along those lines - the 'vintage' gear made and designed in the 50's - 80's is getting older, and parts are getting scarcer, year by year. Personally, I haven't seen many replacements or substitutes that do the job. Granted, of course, there's some newer things that are simply incredible - but do you feel that in, say, 50 years from now, that these things will be unfathomable to maintain and upkeep for the studio? The big thing that comes into mind are the tape machines.

4) How often do you just get sick of hearing music, or audio? Working around it, all the time, do you ever regret that it has, in any way, ruined your musical enjoyment because of your constant analysis of the technical side of things?

I took the big leap of moving from Florida (*shudder*) to the Chicago area. Hopefully I'll be able to record with you in the future, and hopefully, there's promise in this gigantic chaos. I'm glad you found yours!

Best wishes, Steve,

-Marshall


ohmarrow
(stranger)
07/20/07 03:37 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Apologies for encroaching on the 2+2 forums, I understand it's gotta be annoying, but I do have some questions for Steve.

It was cool to read that you considered 'Viva Last Blues' and 'Arise, Therefore' among your favorite recordings as I'm a big fan of those records and Will Oldham in general. I'm assuming you're a fan as well and I'm really curious as to how those sessions went, what your relationship with Will was/is (he's gotta be pretty funny), and what you think of his catalogue from the early Palace stuff to Bonnie 'Prince' Billy. Would you like to do more work with him in the future?

Also, I've been a monstrous fan of your bands for years and I have a lot of love for the majority of the bands you've championed (Scratch Acid, The Jesus Lizard, Killdozer, Six Finger Satellite, Slint, Naked Raygun, Kraftwerk, at least a dozen or two others). Earlier in this thread you expressed interest in making a list of your top 100 Hard Rock bands. Please [censored] do. I know you'd turn me on to a lot of stuff that I haven't heard.

Some of your favorite album art? I know you take great care in that department, Excellent Italian Greyhound felt like a gift. Appreciated.

What was it like working with the reformed Stooges? I should have reserved this question for another post entirely, but I'm being really greedy.

Thanks for doing this by the way. It's a legitimate BIG DEAL for me.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/20/07 04:50 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

during your many years in the music business, I'm sure you've been made countless offers that would require you to compromise your values in order to accept. Have there been any you were particularly tempted by? Were there any you seriously considered accepting? (Or did accept?) Share as many details as you like.



The common stuff, offers of management, major label deals for bands I've been in, that sort of thing, I've never been tempted by. It's obvious to me that I handle my affairs better than anybody else could, I get all the work I need, and my bands have not been limited in any aspirations. Getting more involved with the mainstream showbusiness industry would be a step backwards.

While Shellac was a new band, we played a few European festivals and were disgusted by the whole scene. The promoters were offering a mixed slate of bands, some of whom they were obligated to have because of backroom deals with agencies and labels, some of which were flavor-of-the-month crap, and the rest were just generic light entertainment, where any old band will do. The bands were using these non-critical (but lucrative) gigs as a kind of subsidy, the fans were not being treated well, and the whole thing was a grotesque abstraction of the legitimate band-fan relationship. After a couple of those, we decided that we would be unavailable for festival gigs.

A few years later, we were asked to play All Tomrrow's Parties, under the pretext that "this festival is different." We declined. The promoter and the curating band who nominated us asked again, with a very generous offer. We explained that we didn't care about the money, we just didn't play festival gigs out of principle. That led to a conversation about the festival, and we were persuaded to play.

As it turns out, this festival was different. It was curated by a band, so all the acts were being vouched-for, the patrons got a weekend ticket including a little apartment (rather than a space in a field for a tent) with a private kitchen and bathroom, and the shows were in proper indoor venues rather than in tents exposed to the weather.

For the first time in history, someone said, "but this one is different," and it actually was different. Not only that, but its success as a festival fostered a whole trend in curated, civilized festivals, and now some of the curated festivals are quite good.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/20/07 05:23 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Also, any tips for recording violin? Any special considerations to take into account when recording electric violin vs. acoustic?



Electric violin I treat like any electric instrument -- make sure the band is happy with the sound coming out of the amplifier and record that sound as clearly as possible.

Acoustic violin is a rough one. Microphone choice is pretty important. There is a ton of energy in the very high frequencies, and any peaking in the mic high frequency response can make the violin sound shrill or thin. The holy grail for violin recording is a mic with a smooth and phase-accurate high frequency response (not necessarily flat, but without irregular peaks and notches). A couple of mics come close, good ribbon mics like the Coles/STC 4038 and the Royer R121, and measurement-caliber omni condensers like the DPA 4000 series, the Earthworks mics and the Josephson 617. The only directional condenser mics I have found to sound good on violin have been Schoeps 221b and a Russian mic, the Lomo 19a18, which has been fitted with a new diaphragm by David Josephson.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/20/07 05:35 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

6 voices? i only know of the recorder/flute, string section, and choir voices. what others are there?



Our set is by no means complete, and we have flute, violin, cello, brass, choir, and double-bass.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/20/07 06:00 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

But you must use compressors for some things, though surely.



Bass guitar, 2-3 dB, Bass drum, 3-6dB (usually a peak limiter), vocals 6-8dB (occasionally more in extreme cases), occasionally snare drum 2-3 dB (again a peak limiter). That's about it. Anything more than that and there's some problem that ought to be solved another way.

Quote:

And yet another side question that you've probably been asked loads of times, but who pushes the record button and mans the desk when you've been recording shellac material?



We've had a bunch of people act as tape-op over the years. they're usually credited on the records.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/20/07 06:04 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

you've stuck to your game throughout your career, that's so inspirational to so many people. do you think it's possible for a solo artist to be picked up by an independent label without having played live shows? Or if that's like not having sex and expecting babies



Sure it's possible in a cocorosie/one-in-a-million way. It's a ridiculous thing to aspire to, and betrays a profound laziness.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/20/07 06:15 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

My turntable died about 3+ years ago and I haven't listened to vinyl since (hey, I've been busy).



Hifi turntables are currently being made by Rega, Sota, Music Hall, VPI and many others. You should be able to get a good belt drive turntable for less than $500, and a good tonearm and cartridge for less than $300. You can sometimes get a whole system for less than $500, and with maintenance and new belts and needles, it will last you the rest of your life. You can also get a nice second-hand Thorens or other old school setup for about the same.

Quote:

BTW, I bought 3 copies of the Marmoset/Hated Chinee 7" when it came out after I was told it would be an exciting collectible and make me rich when I sold it. First, am I a douche and second, what'lya gimme for it?



I could use one or two of those, honestly. Make me an offer by PM.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/20/07 06:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

If you didn't have EA and 'Albini' wasn't a buzz word, would you start from the ground up?



When I started, it was from the ground up. I didn't have Electrical, and 'Albini' wasn't a buzz word. So, yes, that's how I would do it. Exactly the way I did do it.

Quote:

2) Quantegy shut it's doors. Not new news. New production analog tape is going kaput.



There is current tape production being run by RMG in the Netherlands, and ATR Magnetics has a whole plant built in Pennsylvania that has yet to come on line, but ought to. While I see tape becoming a boutique item, I don't imagine it will disappear entirely in my lifetime.

Quote:

3) Along those lines - the 'vintage' gear made and designed in the 50's - 80's is getting older, and parts are getting scarcer, year by year. Personally, I haven't seen many replacements or substitutes that do the job.



The reason those things (old microphones and tape machines) are valuable is that they are reliable, year in/year out, and can be readily repaired by us, the end user, or a modest technical service shop. They are all pretty simple machines, and parts can be made if necessary by almost any competent machinist. The tape machines we use here have been in almost constant use since the 1980s, and they are still in fighting fit. They are hard to kill.

Quote:

4) How often do you just get sick of hearing music, or audio? Working around it, all the time, do you ever regret that it has, in any way, ruined your musical enjoyment because of your constant analysis of the technical side of things?



Not really. I mentioned it earlier, but while I'm in the studio, I am listening to music, but not really listening to it as a music fan, so I don't really get tired of it the way I got tired of hearing a hit song permeate the culture or what have you.


strongguy
(member)
07/20/07 09:43 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Do you know the band 'modest mouse'? What do you think of them?

uauaEEE
(enthusiast)
07/20/07 09:58 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Do you know the band 'modest mouse'? What do you think of them?



I don't think I've ever thought of modest mouse.


partycrasher
(stranger)
07/20/07 10:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hope this question isn't too broad, but I was wondering if you've noticed any attitude/perspective shifts among bands over the years. Something akin to how teachers who've been at it a while will say, "kids these days..."

Any noticeable differences in the way bands today think about their music, their label, the music business, the recording process itself, what success means, their odds of achieving that success, how they view their fans, ect?


uauaEEE
(enthusiast)
07/20/07 10:17 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What's that [noise] on the first track of Neurosis' Eye of Every Storm:
You lie in the snow [noise] cold but not dead
Stare in the sun [noise] long since its last heat


squashed
(stranger)
07/20/07 11:51 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Cds have a per-unit lifespan of 20 years or so, if you're lucky. Many fail in as little as 5 years. Other than physically breaking or gouging it, there's no reason a vinyl record won't last several hundred years. Purely-digital data (downloads and other sound files) are infinitely more fragile, since they exist only resident on a drive (which is itself vulnerable to failure) and dependent on software to make any sound at all, and that software is beholden to the software maker for all its functionality, and that software is beholden to the computer industry as a whole. This is more of a problem with proprietary file formats for professional use, but it is true nonetheless.




Hi Steve,

I hate to be disagreeable in first contact with people I greatly admire. But here I am.

I think there is truth that PVC is for practical some purposes are undestructable, but for recording material it is highly questionable theory.

Physical property of PVC. (as you notice, it has tensile strength and young modulus lower than metal)

that alone put into question vinyl ability to maintain its perfect physical shape (groove/valley) when played against LP styles for several thousand times. Of course this is just a bit silly, since people rarely play a record several thousands time in its life time. So I won't argue that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyvinyl_chloride

I think my biggest argument against vinyls are: [I am sure you haven't heard this one since, I am not an audio engineer and won't go that route]

- It has very high noise floor. This is okay for rock/casual room listening, but as more and more people uses high quality headphones, creating their own digital music and exploring different texture and music style, the noise is very noticeable. Plus, over time, vinyl's grove also collect dust. Wear and tear.

- dynamic range. digital is better long term. Beyond current CD limitation, digital really only limited by actual players ability to come closer to theoritical limit of electronics. music file will simply carry more and more information for more accurate sound representation. We haven't even begun exploring the possibility of high fidelity consumer electronics. Vinyl however is pretty much it.

- Cost. Not only cost of printing and distributing, but also storage, maintenance and environment (disposing vinyl.) It is true a lot of hardcore collectors takes good care of their records. But you have to admit, majority of those item are stamped, distributed, played and disposed at great cost. This compared to download/erase.

- Vinyl is not for everybody. It is very luxurious item. The player is big, it cost a lot to maintain. Storage of discs, etc, etc. Compare this to ever cheaper mp3 player. I am sure the price of 4GB player will approach pennies in less than 5 years.

- A digital file is infinitely reproducible. All current CD/.wav are reproducible and it is not locked. Popular lossy compression (.mp3) patent will expire in 2010. I am sure it won't go away anytime soon. Then there are more than enough lossless compression available online including Open source (FLAC). So all in all, the idea that a digital file will become unreadable is bunk, because the "data" itself is reproducible. It only take one person in the world to post a raw .wav file online and that file is immortal. As cost of storage and bandwith plummet, this will be truer. The best audio codec has yet to be written. DRM/closed standard will die, as it is rejected by user.

- Digital will win because. It is dirt cheap, infinitely reproducible, quality as information carrier only limited by bandwith and storage cost, Moore's Law, quality is theoritically infinite. People are going to want to be able to carry 20-30,000 high quality songs in their pocket, and vinyl is not going to be able to provide that.

- I think ultimately digital is about changing everything about recorded music, ultimately the structure of modern recording industry. And that I am pretty sure you think is an interesting situation, albeit uncertain.


Quote:


Regarding sales, CD's only real advantage (not perceived, but real) over vinyl is convenience, and that is how they won their market share. Ipods et al trump that step in convenience by a mile, and so I expect that CDs will lose the convenience-first battle to downloads. That will be the end of them.




Total sale of LP is hardly worth arguing in term of mass entertainment medium. It's undetectable compared to recorded download transaction every day. The situation wont' change anytime soon. I might as well believe in second coming rather than waiting for LP's return. So discussing LP will be forever tied to hardcore audiophile. A silly elitism. Palm reading and mystics sort of elitism. A little bit like discussing hand made 1934 Bugatti vs. 2007 Honda accord. Yeah the Bugatti won '34 grand Prix, but I need something that can survive NJ turnpike.



http://www.blackmailr.com/smr/2007/03/22/sales-of-music-long-in-decline-plunge-sharply/


squashed
(stranger)
07/21/07 12:16 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

just a small addendum, cause I feel rather guilty with that lengthy post.

in term of digital, the most seductive element that you can't possibly pass as a musician and engineer is the possibility of controlling listener's player audio characteristic. Precisely as you wish it rather than fitting your work to some generic device profile. (the audio file, afteral is just a piece of software + data)

That I think is powerful and opens up a lot of possibility.


Ah Leah
(stranger)
07/21/07 01:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Dave Riley's backing vocals on Kerosene were spectacular. Did he gargle with honey before live shows?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/21/07 02:21 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I hate to be disagreeable...



I hear this all the time. I guess I bring it out in people.

Quote:

- (vinyl) has very high noise floor. This is okay for rock/casual room listening, but as more and more people uses high quality headphones, creating their own digital music and exploring different texture and music style, the noise is very noticeable. Plus, over time, vinyl's grove also collect dust. Wear and tear.



I guess I disagree. A properly maintained record should not be objectionably noisy. If the sound of the silences between the songs is the most important part of the record for you, then I guess you shouldn't listen to vinyl records.

Quote:

- dynamic range. digital is better long term. Beyond current CD limitation, digital really only limited by actual players ability to come closer to theoritical limit of electronics. music file will simply carry more and more information for more accurate sound representation. We haven't even begun exploring the possibility of high fidelity consumer electronics. Vinyl however is pretty much it.



Again, you're talking about the sound quality at the noise floor, which is not where I do the majority of my listening.

I'm going to skip over the points I concede regarding cost and convenience. Of course manufacturing nothing is less expensive than manufacturing something.

Quote:

- A digital file is infinitely reproducible. All current CD/.wav are reproducible and it is not locked. Popular lossy compression (.mp3) patent will expire in 2010. I am sure it won't go away anytime soon. Then there are more than enough lossless compression available online including Open source (FLAC). So all in all, the idea that a digital file will become unreadable is bunk, because the "data" itself is reproducible. It only take one person in the world to post a raw .wav file online and that file is immortal. As cost of storage and bandwith plummet, this will be truer. The best audio codec has yet to be written. DRM/closed standard will die, as it is rejected by user.



That digital data are reproducible in no way ensures that they will be copied, and the nature of digital files is they inevitably will disappear unless they are perpetually copied and migrated onto new storage media as the old ones become obsolete (a regimen that absolutely no one is undertaking). Analog recordings just sit on a shelf until you need to play them, and then they play just like always.

I can give you a short (incomplete) list of digital audio formats that are now unrecoverable, despite that they could have been migrated onto other formats: DAT, ADAT, ADAM, DTRS, DCC, 1610 (also 1630), F1 (also 601-901), DBX, JVC Soundstream, Mitsubishi X80, X850, ProDigi, DASH, 3M... You get the idea. What would you do if you found a nine-track tape of some SD1 files, or a U-matic tape with Soundstream data? You sure wouldn't be able to play them.

On the other hand, if you bring me any (yes, any) analog audio recording made in the last 100 years, I'll be able to play it. The more obscure formats might require me to jerry-rig a player, but I'll be able to do it. Anything. Soundmats, anything.

Quote:

Total sale of LP is hardly worth arguing in term of mass entertainment medium. It's undetectable compared to recorded download transaction every day. The situation wont' change anytime soon. I might as well believe in second coming rather than waiting for LP's return. So discussing LP will be forever tied to hardcore audiophile.



Serious hi-fi listeners and their equipment are a billion-dollar+ industry (or so said a friend of mine who ran a hi-fi magazine). Independent labels sell a modest but valuable percentage in vinyl, and there are vinyl specialty labels that sell nothing but. A new disc-cutting lab opened in Chicago a month ago, and they have had regular work. Vinyl records are not going away any time soon. They are not a mass market item, but then neither is anything of superlative quality.
Quote:

A silly elitism. Palm reading and mystics sort of elitism.



I'm sorry you don't like vinyl records, but you're talking like an idiot here.

Quote:

A little bit like discussing hand made 1934 Bugatti vs. 2007 Honda accord. Yeah the Bugatti won '34 grand Prix, but I need something that can survive NJ turnpike.



I wouldn't suggest that vinyl records are a good replacement for convenience-listening items like Ipods. A wedge isn't a universal replacement for a putter either, but it has its place.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/21/07 02:23 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Dave Riley's backing vocals on Kerosene were spectacular. Did he gargle with honey before live shows?



Not honey, no.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/21/07 02:36 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What's that [noise] on the first track of Neurosis' Eye of Every Storm:
You lie in the snow [noise] cold but not dead
Stare in the sun [noise] long since its last heat



Without having the track sheet in front of me, I'll speculate that it was one of Noah's manipulated samples. He is phenomenally creative with those abstract sounds. One sound that appears several times on the record is the sound of whistling bottle rockets played at half-speed and layered in reverse, but the one you mention is more of a roar, and I don't know what it originated as.


village
(stranger)
07/21/07 05:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

o superman, o mom and dad

village
(stranger)
07/21/07 05:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

oh shiz-nit

knockonwood
(Spam?...Nevar...I'd rather eat [censored] and die)
07/21/07 05:50 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What is your opinion of the Australian musician Ben Lee?
Have you ever met him?


village
(stranger)
07/21/07 05:54 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

is this art?

village
(stranger)
07/21/07 06:02 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

TOP FIVE GREATEAST ARTISTS OF ALL TIME:
1) Bob Fosse
2) Freddie Mercury
3) John Waters
4) Steve Albini
5) Paul Thomas Anderson


village
(stranger)
07/21/07 06:04 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

greatest

village
(stranger)
07/21/07 06:09 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Eye heart you.

Spechel EDD
(h0t PiNk 4|yf3)
07/21/07 06:11 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

why is this thread so long

village
(stranger)
07/21/07 06:28 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Stevie-baby. Come on. Up until now there has never been a format in which an uber-fan can just directly connect with his/her idol. Please indulge me...

Spechel EDD
(h0t PiNk 4|yf3)
07/21/07 06:30 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity *DELETED*

Post deleted by Gildwulf

village
(stranger)
07/21/07 07:54 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

tammyfayeisdieing

village
(stranger)
07/21/07 08:34 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

"It's such a lovely way to go."

citanul
(SNG Pooh-Bah)
07/21/07 03:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

village,

chill out.

edd,

the existence of this thread has been alerted to the interwebs, where other people have heard of him, and are interested.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/21/07 04:35 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What is your opinion of the Australian musician Ben Lee?
Have you ever met him?



Through ignorance I have no opinion of his music. He got sort-of famous while very young, and that usually leads to a ridiculous second and third act. I don't know him and haven't heard much of his music.


dodongo
(stranger)
07/21/07 06:47 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

whose decision was it to leave your name out of the liner notes for 'the fragile'?

do you find that you and trent have more similarities or differences in philosophy? how so?


littleitaly5
(stranger)
07/21/07 08:21 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve.

I’ve always (well at least since ’93) wanted to know why there’s the “suggested bass and treble positions”-diagram in the In Utero booklet. Whose idea was it to put it there? And why didn’t you just tweak the levels beforehand?


angeldustone
(stranger)
07/21/07 10:43 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What do you think of Mike Patton? He seems to be an interesting musician in that he used Faith No More's major label deal as a springboard for numerous musical projects (i.e.. getting exposure for Mr. Bungle) to the point where he is now. That being a singer with numerous projects/bands, his own label and a dedicated and loyal following.

On a sidenote..Mr. Bungle's Disco Volante has to be one of the strangest records ever released by a major...have you heard it?


Ah Leah
(stranger)
07/22/07 02:41 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

He won't be posting tonight. It's a Saturday night. He either has a session or a dinner date.

calaverasgrandes
(stranger)
07/22/07 03:05 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

If you like the Jesus Lizard, you're stuck with only them, because nobody else comes close.



Oh gee now you are being humble. I find Rapeman to be every bit as good in a SIMilar vein. Likewise I find JL could never have existed without Scratch Acid, who were effing faceripping in 85 or so).
That all aside. Have you ever heard someone mix a recording that you did that really screwed up the sound you were going for?
PS how is working with neurosis? While I am a big fan of a lot of their stuff, they seem to sound more "studio" with each new release.


king of the deck
(journeyman)
07/22/07 03:25 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

6 voices? i only know of the recorder/flute, string section, and choir voices. what others are there?



Our set is by no means complete, and we have flute, violin, cello, brass, choir, and double-bass.




sweet, will you guys let me record a cover of 'big bottom' at electrical


calaverasgrandes
(stranger)
07/22/07 04:20 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Steve, oops I guess what I meant to ask about Neurosis didnt translate very well (worked a 12hour shift doing networking stuff, and proceeded to lose my wallet at a grocery store afterwards, with everything in it, so I am up on nerves brainfarting)

What I MEANT to ask was how is it working with Neurosis esp Dave and Noah as they seem to be from a more Pro Tools-y direction and making pretty much electronic music. Whereas your forte seems to be in capturing acoustic energy in a space.

PS not besmirching Dave and Noah at all, friends of mine actually. shared stages/practice spaces with em. Recorded Noahs old band Blister once.


squashed
(stranger)
07/22/07 01:23 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

That digital data are reproducible in no way ensures that they will be copied, and the nature of digital files is they inevitably will disappear unless they are perpetually copied and migrated onto new storage media as the old ones become obsolete (a regimen that absolutely no one is undertaking). Analog recordings just sit on a shelf until you need to play them, and then they play just like always.




From music fan point of view, naive one mind you:

big picture wise, one only needs to convert once to a Hardrive with some standard format, and keep data specification as a note. Plus, data storage/digital locker service is a dime a dozen these days.

at practical level, you pretty much take home the argument. It's not possible to save people from every stupidities/freak accident. If a person doesn't have the foresight and not transfering their digital data into most common/most reliable/cheap medium/not controled by single corporation. ... well. ... The music is owned by the guy who control the mechanism plus hand of time. That's pretty much true for any medium. It's only a question if a person is comfortable rigging an analog reader or write a digital hack.

So if I find any random digital maste" from who knows where, as a music fan I pretty much look at it like I find a moon rock. If I am curious enough, I might then google and find a studio that still has said equipment so I can read it. Not an elegant solution I am sure.

The very point of "digital" is to be able to precisely extract out information and seperate it from the medium later. If a person doesn't take advantage of this feature and wishing a medium will last forever. Well, ... I mean. Whaddya gonna do?. In that case, record in the best analog devices.

" DAT, ADAT, ADAM, DTRS, DCC, 1610 (also 1630), F1 (also 601-901), DBX, JVC Soundstream, Mitsubishi X80, X850, ProDigi, DASH, 3M... You get the idea. What would you do if you found a nine-track tape of some SD1 files, or a U-matic tape with Soundstream data? You sure wouldn't be able to play them."


As exercise, if hypothetically I find a master in those standard, can I get a service to shove it into a HD today?

F1
http://www.audiotubes.com/prorates.htm
X850
http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/sep05/articles/fxcopyroom.htm
DBX
http://aroundcny.com/technofile/texts/dbx700recorder86.html

nine-track tape
http://www.chicorporation.com/ninetrack/drives/index.html
SD-1
http://www.youngmonkey.ca/nose/audio_tech/synth/Ensoniq-DiskFormats.html

PS. very clever Steve. yer not probing me trying to figure out if I am a programmer or a studio engineer are ya? :P


PPS. I am surprise there is no "general" catalog, on the net describing various recording specification and where people can go to get the data out. I bet there are plenty of desperate people wanting to know that.


"On the other hand, if you bring me any (yes, any) analog audio recording made in the last 100 years, I'll be able to play it."

be carefull what you wish for, you might have to eat your short. :P
(but then again, you might call my bluff and ask me to bring in a holographic disc containing analog sound recording.)

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/20060050339.html

A hologram recording method includes generating a signal beam with data formed by superimposing pattern data, the pattern data representing a pattern in which a large number of plural kinds of pixels having different tone values are arranged in a two-dimensional manner, on an image data of respective pixels represented by tone values corresponding to density, and recording a hologram by irradiating a converted beam formed by Fourier transformation of the generated signal beam with a lens and a reference beam to an optical recording medium.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/22/07 02:55 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Squashed, you will doubtless appreciate that I don't want to rely on hiring someone off the internet to make a copy of old masters for me, and in what an awkward position this would put the rights owner. A couple of years ago, some original Led Zeppelin master tapes made their way out onto the internet via a "simple" copy someone wanted to make.

Additionally, playing a digital master is not necessarily the simple process you imagine. The Mitsubishi X-series tape machines, for example, have mechanical head alignment adjustments, which tend to drift more and more over time. Mitsubishi did not supply alignment tapes or instructions (as they were considered intellectual property), and it did not allow them to be made by a secondary source. For this reason, if you find a working X-series machine, it is unlikely to play back any master tape not recorded on it.

I only know this because I was peripherally involved in another studio trying to play an X80 tape about 8 years ago. It proved to be impossible on the two machines they found in Chicago and three more in Nashville -- including the one it was supposedly recorded on.

Eventually they used a commercially-pressed vinyl record for the re-issue master.

I tell this story because it demonstrates that the digital nature of the data is meaningless, because the data are still resident on a medium (there are another couple of pages I could fill about the volatility of digital media, but this is far enough afield for the moment), and that medium is subject to the failures of time, the playback device, penetration of the technology and (increasingly) intellectual property protections. The story would be the same if the data were on one of the many proprietary removable tape systems or any other format long since discarded by the computer industry.

Analog recordings are much more robust, and playback devices are ubiquitous, non-proprietary and not particularly difficult to make, if it comes to that. Analog recordings require no additional attention to last centuries. Longevity is built-in.

If you want to continue the sport of trying to find "solutions" to my reservations about digital recording, be my guest. It is clearly entertaining you, and it might be entertaining for others. You are unlikely to come up with anything that hasn't occurred to me in the last 20 years that I have been working on the problem myself, but it can't hurt anything.


calaverasgrandes
(stranger)
07/22/07 06:24 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

eh dat isnt that volatile. I recently transferred some old (12 years) dats into my system, edited em, burned to CDRW.
FWIW CDR's that are more than a few years old are dying on me. CDRW's seem to be more "robust". I am more cagey about DVDr as a backup because the pits are even smaller and closer together.


drink
(stranger)
07/22/07 06:26 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Happy Birthday Steve Albini!

As far as a question… I don't really have a good one. I'll just say that I absolutely love the sound of Didn't It Rain by Songs: Ohia. Also, Things We Lost in the Fire by Low. Two of my favorite albums.

Well, OK, here's a question (or two): are you still going to be recording stuff for Jason Molina? And what's he like to work with? Seemed like a reasonably nice guy when a friend of mine approached him at shows.

And I'll have to add that I'm not crazy about the way Low sounds now that they're working with Dave Fridmann.


DJ Psychomike
(stranger)
07/22/07 07:04 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I have always told people in bands that they should find interviews with you for a good idea on the way the recording industry works. That and watching the Hanson film that actually has negotiations and fights on film between the record company and the band. (Talk about burning your bridges!)

The White Stripes seem to have sparked a 7" revival in the UK which continues to grow. When record companies switched to CD's it was the techno and house kids that kept turntables alive. It seems to me the way to get kids to stop downloading is to present them with a keepsake (something like the gatefold albums of the past that we would shake our seeds out of on, er I mean, look at and pass around). CD's just don't have that feel, regardless how anyone feels about the sound.

By presenting people with something they can own and dream on as well as the music is the way to bring vinyl back. Thoughts?

Prince just released his new album in the UK as an insert in a Sunday paper (I don't think he's done anything good in 12 years but love this concept)- he got a million for it (and didn't have to wait years to get paid) and 3 million were sold in one day.

Should a band today consider the different forms of distribution and not just labels or do you think that isn't important? With newspaper and magazine sales plummeting frankly if TIME OUT had a special cd issue in which you picked music you liked I would buy several copies. How do you feel about this?

Have you ever heard any mashups of your work? (Don't worry I don't sell them or post them online). How do you feel about this?

Thank you for being honest.

"The modern day artist refuses to die!" - Eric Satie

PS- would you cheat at strip poker?


squashed
(stranger)
07/22/07 11:12 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Analog recordings are much more robust, and playback devices are ubiquitous, non-proprietary and not particularly difficult to make, if it comes to that. Analog recordings require no additional attention to last centuries. Longevity is built-in.

If you want to continue the sport of trying to find "solutions" to my reservations about digital recording, be my guest. It is clearly entertaining you, and it might be entertaining for others. You are unlikely to come up with anything that hasn't occurred to me in the last 20 years that I have been working on the problem myself, but it can't hurt anything.




Well, there is that silly ha ha aspect, but underneath I do wonder about something more serious:

1. The function of digital audio as a way to distribute music. (take aside the recording technology aspect, because obviously making records, the art of capturing sound and putting it in some medium will be forever be an aesthetic system. An art. The more digital a recording method becomes, the more intense artistic side needs to be because there are so much more freedom to capture and transform the sound wave, etc... This holds true for every single data collection previously done on analog only devices. Plus this will quickly devolve into toy talk and specification table.) But as a way to distribute music, all statistic shows digital is altering the economics of recording industry. The majors are dying. Partly because listeners can truly scan huge amount of music and not paying the one they don't want to pay. As people know where to look for better music beyond radio/TV, the economic relationship also changes. IMO, the general long term advantage far outweigh the negative.

2. This leads to second item I am wondering. What shape of audience-musician connection you think ideally can exist in digital world beyond go to concert, buy albums. (I think the net gives opportunity for audience to enter into the artist-label equation differently than before.)

The difficulty with digital file of course. a) the price perception is different. Nobody really spends time answering this yet. Everybody pretends things will be the same. b) current audio quality is very low. c) obviously CD will be dead pretty soon.

You are few people accessible online who has unique perspective on this.


------------
just hit me.
incidentally, the latest attempt along the DIY digital media is of course Ubuntu studio. It is in very primitive stage right now, but it has the foundation to get away from all silly industry locked beginning from operating system. no more proprietary softwares, hardware plugs, add ons, certifications, etc.


calaverasgrandes
(stranger)
07/22/07 11:29 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

as far as digital vs analog. Analog tape simply sounds better and mixes itself compared to digital mediums. In my current project I am composing, recording and posting a new song on the internet at least once a week for the whole year of 2007.
out of deference to Steve I wont put up any links. Needless to say this would be difficult to pull off in the analog world recording-wise. But not impossible. jingle guys do better than this by an order of magnitude, and have been for decades. But again on the distribution side....
Also, cost considerations. It woudl be prohibitive to try and pay for that many reels of tape. Disk space however, is almost free in comparison.


ripshark
(stranger)
07/23/07 12:28 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

What is the best stuff you've worked on that's practically never been heard?

My company is seeking some of these lost and/or under appreciated gems in order to secure their digital distribution rights. We are also seeking small indie labels that might simply be looking to have their cd catalog's converted into new digital formats so that can be sold via iTunes, etc.

I realize that this might sound somewhat sacrilegious in light of the recent analog/digital thread, but finding some of this stuff a much deserved audience in any format is better than none, in my opinion.

Anything come to mind?


rainonacongadrum
(*)
07/23/07 01:24 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Great thread. What do you think of Brian Deck and other Chicago area producers?

What all should a band have down and prepared before they enter the studio?


hime
(old hand)
07/23/07 01:33 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Dude, I hear them all the time. Just did a record for a band from Denton, Texas called Record Hop, and they were terrific. Rock bands are everywhere, and there are always a few good ones.





I'm from Denton and I can say Scott and Ashley are very nice people. I've only heard their band once or twice.


blairosh
(stranger)
07/23/07 02:07 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I was talking to the band Yourcodenameis:milo recently about their "All Roads To Fault" album that you produced and they told me that you were "very confused" by their sound! Do you stand by that comment or did you enjoy working with them? Have you managed to listen to either of their subsequent two albums, and if so, what do you make of them? Personally, I think they're one hell of an underrated band that continue to push boundaries.

Also, out of the two Mono albums, which one's your favourite - "Walking Cloud" or "You Are There"? On a side note, the song "Lost Snow" is perfect.


angeldustone
(stranger)
07/23/07 04:00 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,

Is there any sonic advantage at all in mixing down/mastering a digital recording to tape as the last stage in the process? Here in NYC many high end mastering shops reccomend this to "warm up" the recording. Is this 100% [censored]?


tapler
(stranger)
07/24/07 09:06 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Are you a film score enthusiast at all? Any favorite film scores or composers? Have you recorded films scores and how is the process different than making a record?

Thanks, from a carpetbagging forum intruder...


hulahoophugs
(stranger)
07/24/07 09:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

In Owls' self titled album you recorded, Tim's vocals seemed to be panning left and right in the song "everyone is my friend." Are you actually just panning back and forth on the vocals or are there stereo room mics set up and i'm hearing his vocals bouncing off the walls? it's a very cool effect and i noticed it's only on that track ( i may be wrong though)

hulahoophugs
(stranger)
07/24/07 09:31 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

sorry about all of the questions, but also, how was working with Owls?

JMG24
(stranger)
07/25/07 01:11 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve, a few questions:

What do you think of a la carte downloading as opposed to buying the full album? For fans and artists alike, is it a good or bad thing?


cassettesmith
(stranger)
07/25/07 02:33 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Any thoughts on the last Scott Walker record, The Drift.

I know that you've said your longest recording session has rarely gone longer than a month and that they generally go for two weeks max. How do you think you would stomach working on record for seven years?

(Assuming that this was, of course, not a major label attempting to score big on a record; to make it easier, assume that it was Walker and 4AD, or if more to your liking, the Jesus Lizard and Touch & Go.)


calaverasgrandes
(stranger)
07/25/07 08:06 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Ever feel any responsibility for the current popularity of ribbons esp the coles 4038? I had never heard of coles anywhere until I read an interview with you in Mix or EQ or some other rag. Now even sweetwater caries them, and som guitar centers!

damntang
(stranger)
07/26/07 06:01 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve,

Can you remember what gear kurt Cobain used when recording In Utero, I'm particularly interested in his pedals.

Cheers,

D.T.


MikeyPatriot
(BBV MS Paint Emergency Technician)
07/26/07 09:54 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve, are you still checking this thread? How do you feel about being the catalyst of the 4th more replied to thread in BBV4L?

Also, does this exchange between my friend and I represent your view of the White Sox right now?

Friend (4:27:26 PM): Sox have bases loaded 0 outs. What're the odds they score more than 1 run?
Friend (4:27:38 PM): A.J up.,
Mikey Patriot (4:29:25 PM): They'll score one run when AJ hits into a DP
Friend (4:28:55 PM): hahaha
Friend (4:28:57 PM): BINGO
Friend (4:29:26 PM): JD up with a guy on third...
Friend (4:29:29 PM): 2 Outs.
Mikey Patriot (4:30:11 PM): Wait, are you serious?
Friend (4:29:36 PM): You nailed it.


dodongo
(stranger)
07/27/07 12:11 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

i guess it's over

Archmart
(stranger)
07/27/07 01:49 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Hey!

Thank you 2+2 devotees for your patience with us civilians. I haven't played a really good game of poker in decades. Reading through this thread has me asking myself why.

Steve,

It's always a pleasure to hear your thoughts, opinions, etc. and especially so given your gift of straight-talk and clear, concise observation and thinking. Your sense of humor doesn't hurt either. (After reading this thread I've had to utilize both Private Dancer and my previous solution, the Hawaii Five-O theme to get the Clapper jingle out of my head.)

A few questions...

1) You mentioned seeing the Detholz! perform. What are your thoughts on their live show(s) and do you think the element of "Shtick" in their shows and persona should be maintained, emphasized, or diminished?

2) If you've heard their records, in terms of songs more-so than production, do you find their recent turn toward introspection a positive direction for them? Do you find their latest, "Cast Out Devils" to be a better album than "Who are the Detholz?"? Are they growing in the best direction for them?

3) If I understand your position on Analog vs. Digital recording, the single most important factor is the long term viability of the recorded media. Given the simple workflow advantages (although debatable) and affordability (and thus accessibility for the bands), do you think there's a possible solution to be found in a system that would make backing up to analog tape more automatic, convenient, and user friendly, allowing people to work the way most want to work but leaving them a sort of insurance policy for the future or their media?

Thanks,
Archmart


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 08:44 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

What is the best stuff you've worked on that's practically never been heard?




please read the whole thread
already asked and answered
UTFSF


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 08:50 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Great thread. What do you think of Brian Deck and other Chicago area producers?



Brian worked at Idful
helped a lot of bands rock out
seemed like a good guy

Quote:

What all should a band have down and prepared before they enter the studio?



Please know your music
before you try to record
skip backing vocals


Gonso
(Instant Star)
07/27/07 08:54 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I knew I recognized the name. God bless you for this:








This is one of the best records ever

Actually, how was she to work with


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 08:57 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

I was talking to the band Yourcodenameis:milo recently about their "All Roads To Fault" album that you produced and they told me that you were "very confused" by their sound!



No British band is
capable of confusing
anyone on earth

Quote:

I think they're one hell of an underrated band that continue to push boundaries.



True, a fine band of
lads but "boundaries?" My god
are you a writer?

Quote:

Also, out of the two Mono albums, which one's your favourite - "Walking Cloud" or "You Are There"? On a side note, the song "Lost Snow" is perfect.



All Mono albums
are outstanding in kind
I cannot choose one


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:05 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Steve,

Is there any sonic advantage at all in mixing down/mastering a digital recording to tape as the last stage in the process? Here in NYC many high end mastering shops reccomend this to "warm up" the recording. Is this 100% [censored]?



It sounds different
impossible to predict
if you will prefer

mostly marketing
to distinguish otherwise
identical hacks


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:08 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Are you a film score enthusiast at all? Any favorite film scores or composers? Have you recorded films scores and how is the process different than making a record?



I just do records
movie people are Ay-holes
film scores not my bag


NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/27/07 09:13 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Haiku a new passion of yours?

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:27 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Any thoughts on the last Scott Walker record, The Drift.



Overrated but
undeniable weirdo
arty Phil Collins

Quote:

I know that you've said your longest recording session has rarely gone longer than a month and that they generally go for two weeks max. How do you think you would stomach working on record for seven years?



not really work, a
masquerade of genius
through indulgent waste

See earlier post
regarding one Laughing Stock
also MBV

If you need some months
to record your album then
for sure it will suck

Quote:

(Assuming that this was, of course, not a major label attempting to score big on a record; to make it easier, assume that it was Walker and 4AD, or if more to your liking, the Jesus Lizard and Touch & Go.)



the Jesus Lizard
only took a couple days
their albums kick ass


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:31 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Ever feel any responsibility for the current popularity of ribbons esp the coles 4038? I had never heard of coles anywhere until I read an interview with you in Mix or EQ or some other rag. Now even sweetwater caries them, and som guitar centers!



Good microphones like
the truth (pace bard Shakespeare)
will out in whispers


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:34 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Can you remember what gear kurt Cobain used when recording In Utero, I'm particularly interested in his pedals.



Boss DS3 and
ubiquitous Big Muff Pi
also a Sans Amp

Fender Quad Reverb
broken, but one working tube
sounded pretty great


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:42 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Steve, are you still checking this thread? How do you feel about being the catalyst of the 4th more replied to thread in BBV4L?



Some paint great pictures,
sing indescribable songs.
I type on the net.

Quote:

Also, does this exchange between my friend and I represent your view of the White Sox right now?



Perceptive, you are
and your friend. Please nobody
mention Jermaine Dye


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:53 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

1) You mentioned seeing the Detholz! perform. What are your thoughts on their live show(s) and do you think the element of "Shtick" in their shows and persona should be maintained, emphasized, or diminished?



Camp as forty tents
the Dethholz! basically Sparks
(Ron and Russel Mael)

Or maybe the Tubes
I cannot decide between
Gay camp and nerd camp

Quote:

2) If you've heard their records, in terms of songs more-so than production, do you find their recent turn toward introspection a positive direction for them? Do you find their latest, "Cast Out Devils" to be a better album than "Who are the Detholz?"? Are they growing in the best direction for them?



Luckily for them
the Dethholz! get to decide
the best direction

Quote:

3) If I understand your position on Analog vs. Digital recording, the single most important factor is the long term viability of the recorded media. Given the simple workflow advantages (although debatable) and affordability (and thus accessibility for the bands), do you think there's a possible solution to be found in a system that would make backing up to analog tape more automatic, convenient, and user friendly, allowing people to work the way most want to work but leaving them a sort of insurance policy for the future or their media?



These two paradigms
incompatibly exist
you can't combine them

the attributes of
either preclude benefits
of the other one

digital storage
is fragile sculpture
a bust carved in ice

analog is fine
like your grandmother
why give her fake boobs?


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 09:58 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Haiku a new passion of yours?



trying to salvage
rapidly collapsing thread
Haiku not as lame


ebepse
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/27/07 10:21 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

how many other people went through these haikus and counted on their fingers to make sure they were right amount of syllables?

No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/27/07 10:28 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

how many other people went through these haikus and counted on their fingers to make sure they were right amount of syllables?




*raises hand*


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 11:29 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

sorry about all of the questions, but also, how was working with Owls?



Who?


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/27/07 11:32 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

sorry about all of the questions, but also, how was working with Owls?



Who?




I see what you did there.


Epstein478
(stranger)
07/27/07 01:09 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

there is a band clockcleaner that I have heard bob weston say good things about, have you heard of them? any opinion at all on them? That nevermind record was ok.

electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 01:41 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

there is a band clockcleaner that I have heard bob weston say good things about, have you heard of them? any opinion at all on them? That nevermind record was ok.



Hey Bob stop sending
loser dorks from bands to spam
this thread about me

Me me me me me
this thread ought to be about
me me only me


Hanys
(stranger)
07/27/07 01:57 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

there is a band clockcleaner that I have heard bob weston say good things about, have you heard of them? any opinion at all on them? That nevermind record was ok.




Obviously, that nevermind thing was not.

I forgot another unanswered question. Was Gallons of Rubbing Alcohol(...) improvised?


NozeCandy
(Carpal \'Tunnel)
07/27/07 02:02 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

not really work, a
masquerade of genius
through indulgent waste



Ehhh, borderline.


Archmart
(stranger)
07/27/07 02:03 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Hey!

Ok, subscribe to
Very modern form haiku
No seasonal word

Wanna save your thread?
Record made want to record!
TapeOpCon Story

Oh and though there is
No invitation in play
What time Tuesday nights?

Archmart


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 02:20 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Ok, subscribe to
Very modern form haiku
No seasonal word



We have a critic
hidebound by a tradition
blow me all winter


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 02:25 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

not really work, a
masquerade of genius
through indulgent waste



Ehhh, borderline.



dude try it sometime
distill precise abstract thoughts
maintaining this structure

It's a right bastard
prime prop bet material
I'd bury all of you


Archmart
(stranger)
07/27/07 02:37 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hey Hey!

What puts the "e" in
Josephson twenty-two "s"
Why only on all?

Archmart


dodongo
(stranger)
07/27/07 05:14 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Me me me me me
this thread ought to be about
me me only me




oh come on, that one's just lazy.


Georgia Avenue
(BBV Film Director)
07/27/07 05:53 PM
HU HAIKU

Wait wait wait...dude, what?
Was that an open challange?
Diebitter: you ain't.

Stick to knob twirling.
Your haiku are well written--
for an engineer...

"Blow me all winter" = superlolz


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/27/07 05:54 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

Me me me me me
this thread ought to be about
me me only me




oh come on, that one's just lazy.



"oh come on, that one's
just lazy." Nice try dude, you're
nine syllables short


pigeon
(stranger)
07/27/07 06:21 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Steve,
I really like the records you did with Distorted Pony. In regards to the guitar sound do you remember what mics you used? Did you record one of the records in L.A. at their house? What was the recording (gear and amp/musician arrangements)?

Also if you're at a commercial studio besides your own what are some of the mics you’d expect them to have available?

Have you done any projects you can recall on 16 track 1”?

Thanks.


retx
(stranger)
07/27/07 09:39 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

I am a foh touring engineer. I have ran monitors for you guys twice at Cats Cradle in Chapel Hill which was my local for a while, and it was kind of difficult to work with the band. I know it could have been any number of reasons, ( inadequate system, bad day driving, personal problems, touring itself, etc.) so i blow that stuff off. i also think you were having problems with your amp. One that you made i believe.
My questions are, does the road start to wear on you?
Which do you enjoy more, recording or touring?
How do you deal with unapproachable bands, on tour or in your studio?

note: this is not a slap in the face. im not ragging on you for being moody on the road.


captain2man
(enthusiast)
07/28/07 02:23 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

In my world - you are no "micro celebrity". I'm a huge Big Black & Shellac fan. Not as familiar with Rapeman. The Jesus Lizard were one of the top 5 greatest bands of all time...they are a band I truly, truly miss seeing. I'd walk to Chicago to see a reunion. Glad to have you here.

calaverasgrandes
(stranger)
07/28/07 04:28 AM
400 blows, the band, not the boring movie

Have you seen 400 blows? If you havent you missed the best band ever with no bass. Now they have other guitarist. Their last show with Chistian was phenomenal for no other reason than that everyone left after the crusty punk stabbing and missed them.
Anyone in LA should go to;
Sat. Aug 4 @ the Echoplex
1154 Glendale Blvd. LA

the Locust
the Bronx
Qui (David Yow's current thing)
$15-17 6pm all ages

there are 2 special guest bands playing, I'm not allowed to say who they are, but lets just say one of em is fer-shir a group of "jerks" worth "circling" august 4th on your calender for, also, that other secret group starts with an "M" and rhymes with "Shelvins"
the 2 secret bands are 100% confirmed...

Its a benefit for The drummer of 400 blows who almost died on their last tour. Probably from touring so much. Those guys tour like 3-4 times a year

PS is there a brand of cards you prefer. I am partial to these NWA cards I have.
Or good ole Bicycle.


electrical
(Loaded for bear)
07/28/07 10:04 PM
Re: 400 blows, the band, not the boring movie

Quote:

Have you seen 400 blows? If you havent you missed the best band ever with no bass. Now they have other guitarist. Their last show with Chistian was phenomenal for no other reason than that everyone left after the crusty punk stabbing and missed them.
Anyone in LA should go to;
Sat. Aug 4 @ the Echoplex
1154 Glendale Blvd. LA

the Locust
the Bronx
Qui (David Yow's current thing)
$15-17 6pm all ages

there are 2 special guest bands playing, I'm not allowed to say who they are, but lets just say one of em is fer-shir a group of "jerks" worth "circling" august 4th on your calender for, also, that other secret group starts with an "M" and rhymes with "Shelvins"
the 2 secret bands are 100% confirmed...



Now promoters too
Jesus quit spamming this thread
Dude have you no shame?


squashed
(stranger)
07/29/07 12:09 AM
nt

aha,

so that's why I got that email from tgrec.
no. I don't work in the industry.


galmost
(member)
07/29/07 12:43 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity


I've just heard "Prayer To God" for the first time.
This is like the greatest song ever.

That is all.


jeoyramone
(stranger)
07/29/07 11:10 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

On topic... can you add anything to the legend of the Cheap Trick "In Color" sessions you did?

The copies that circulate are incredible. Is there any chance this will come out in some sort of authorized form or is that a better question for the band.

In any case, I really think you took a great album and made it legendary with that rerecord.


captain2man
(enthusiast)
07/29/07 11:51 AM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

i can't believe how many new 2+2'ers there are because of this one thread.

As an admitted fan (see a few posts back) & a poker player (I'll see ya at the stud tables every here & again - although I'm mostly a HE player)....here are 2 quick questions for you:

1) I would think working with a band like Low would either be the simplest or the most difficult band to produce. Can you quickly discuss what it's like to work with just a minimalistic band?

2) I've heard you hate "Lungs"....is this true? Why? What's your own personal favorite Big Black record?


felix240
(stranger)
07/29/07 01:36 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

'nother Big Black question - what was your distortion of choice during Atomizer and Songs About F**king? Was it the Boss Metallizer?

heckler_89
(stranger)
07/29/07 02:08 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

2 questions:

1. Was there a falling-out between you and Gogol Bordello? I saw that their new CD wasn't produced by you, and it also kind of sucks.

2. What is that red stuff all over you in the Pigpile DVD, and how did it get there?


Lulu Latouche
(stranger)
07/30/07 12:40 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Hi Steve ,

Any good stories on working with Man or Astroman ?
Just curious how one of my favourite bands is in real life .

Thanks ! ! !


futuredoc85
(flips in GOD MODE)
07/30/07 01:12 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Hi Steve ,

Any good stories on working with Man or Astroman ?
Just curious how one of my favourite bands is in real life .

Thanks ! ! !




Everyone in the band agrees you should die on christmas morning


No Fizzle
(veteran)
07/30/07 01:58 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

2 questions:
2. What is that red stuff all over you in the Pigpile DVD, and how did it get there?




I hate to answer a question for Steve, but, did you SEE the DVD? It's blood, you [censored] moran.


heckler_89
(stranger)
07/31/07 09:05 PM
Re: Ask a music scene micro celebrity

Quote:

Quote:

2 questions:
2. What is that red stuff all over you in the Pigpile DVD, and how did it get there?




I hate to answer a question for Steve, but, did you SEE the DVD? It's blood, you [censored] moran.



I heard somewhere that two girls were spraying him with somer